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    • Locornwall
    • By Locornwall 6th Aug 19, 9:15 AM
    • 271Posts
    • 27Thanks
    Locornwall
    Wood burning stove?
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 19, 9:15 AM
    Wood burning stove? 6th Aug 19 at 9:15 AM
    I am in the process of buying a new build house. It has central heating throughout.

    I would like to get a wood burning stove in the living room. This is more for the look during those cold winter months.

    Does anyone have any thoughts on putting a wood burning stove in a room with central heating already? Canít help but think Iím wasting my money, although Iíd like that traditional living room.
Page 1
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 6th Aug 19, 10:08 AM
    • 5,064 Posts
    • 3,563 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:08 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:08 AM
    Is there a working flue?
    • Locornwall
    • By Locornwall 6th Aug 19, 10:46 AM
    • 271 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    Locornwall
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:46 AM
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:46 AM
    No, but I understand this can all be done.
    • brewerdave
    • By brewerdave 6th Aug 19, 10:54 AM
    • 5,763 Posts
    • 2,590 Thanks
    brewerdave
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:54 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:54 AM
    No, but I understand this can all be done.
    Originally posted by Locornwall

    We installed a small log burner in our lounge ~ 2 years ago, in an existing fireplace. A metal liner was dropped down the existing chimney to connect. It is rated at 4kw and certainly warms the lounge and the hall up in the Winter, when the radiators were struggling to cope.

    HOWEVER, we didn't see much of a drop in our gas usage and we are spending ~ £160 pa on kiln dried logs.
    Furthermore, we were told that,if we hadn't had a chimney in working order, the installation costs would have been almost doubled!!
    • Locornwall
    • By Locornwall 6th Aug 19, 10:59 AM
    • 271 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    Locornwall
    • #5
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:59 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:59 AM
    How much did it cost you, plus installation costs?
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 6th Aug 19, 10:59 AM
    • 2,296 Posts
    • 6,091 Thanks
    Loanranger
    • #6
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:59 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Aug 19, 10:59 AM
    Don't underestimate the mess and the dust they create and, if the flue is exposed, how ugly they are. Where will you store the logs to keep them dry? I had one for fourteen years and it was nice to sit in front of during the winter months but the work it created outweighed that.

    I would not buy a house with one installed.

    They are a bit like decking, Belfast sinks and other fads. Soon go out of fashion when the downsides are lived with.
    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 6th Aug 19, 11:01 AM
    • 13,136 Posts
    • 11,721 Thanks
    savemoney
    • #7
    • 6th Aug 19, 11:01 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Aug 19, 11:01 AM
    Expensive to have one installed, and fuel is now expensive. I have had one for 10 years and this year decided I no longer will buy large qualities of wood in summer when its a little cheaper because the price is now silly due to demand. Nice to have one I admit but I will only use mine now maybe once a week rather than 4-5 times a week. You also find you still need GCH on as the heat doesn't travel much and mine is in dining room open plan and have two stove fans going
    • Locornwall
    • By Locornwall 6th Aug 19, 11:09 AM
    • 271 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    Locornwall
    • #8
    • 6th Aug 19, 11:09 AM
    • #8
    • 6th Aug 19, 11:09 AM
    Ok so sounds like it’s not worth it considering the amount of mess. I thought it being all internalised there would be minimal mess.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 6th Aug 19, 11:12 AM
    • 3,227 Posts
    • 4,182 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 19, 11:12 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 19, 11:12 AM
    How much did it cost you, plus installation costs?
    Originally posted by Locornwall
    I had an inset cassette stove fitted a couple of years back - This replaced an existing open fire, so just needed a liner installed in the chimney. For just the liner and commissioning the stove, it was abound £1200 from memory. I still had to do all the brickwork, plastering, and hearth which would have added another £600 or so.

    if you have the right sort of property and lots of space to store the logs, a stove is worth having. But do not underestimate the amount of wood you might get through each winter. I have a 10'x6' shed packed to the roof with firewood. During a really cold winter, this might just about last. Also have a similar sized pile outside, but under cover, slowly drying out for winter 2021.

    For just a focal point in a room, have a look at a flueless gas (or alcohol) stove.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • brewerdave
    • By brewerdave 6th Aug 19, 11:52 AM
    • 5,763 Posts
    • 2,590 Thanks
    brewerdave
    How much did it cost you, plus installation costs?
    Originally posted by Locornwall
    For almost the smallest model available ,we paid £2200 inc installation - because we already had an unused chimney there wasn't really any mess.

    We toyed with the idea of a bigger stove but because it wouldn't fit within the existing fireplace footprint , it would have more than doubled the price in extra installation and making good.
    As per other posters - nice to have not cheap to run!
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 6th Aug 19, 4:11 PM
    • 4,729 Posts
    • 3,051 Thanks
    matelodave
    we had a free standing stove installed about six years ago into our bungalow.

    As far as I can remember the stove was around £900, the twin-wall insulated flue which goes up through the living room ceiling and straight up through the loft space cost about about £1600-£1800. I would think that installing one into a house would be even more expensive due to the extra height, even if it was located on an outside wall. Add the cost of boxing in, if it has to go through a bedroom. The slate hearth was around £100.

    Add to that the cost of fuel, we've had several years when I've managed to get most of it free (just the cost of a chain saw & axe to cut it up) but since then it's cost around £200 a year to run it, usually just for 3-4 hours an evening between October and March. The log store cost me another £100 to build coz we need somewhere to store all the logs.

    As our central heating is derived from a heatpump it's probably only reduced our leccy bill by around £100 a year.

    We don't find it particularly messy although the extra dust it causes is noticeable. The glass needs a wipe over every day and the ashpan needs to be emptied about once a week or less.

    Even though it sits on a 1 metre square slate plinth we've managed to get a couple of burns on the carpet where embers have fallen out, missed or bounced on the hearth and landed on the carpet when the door has been opened.

    We'll still use it coz it's nice, but the cost of fuel is rising, especially kiln dried stuff or briquettes, I reckon the cost of logs has increased by around 50% since we've had it.

    Dont forget if you can get free wood, you have to season it for at least a year before you can use it so you need enough space to store about two years worth.
    Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large numbers
    • Locornwall
    • By Locornwall 6th Aug 19, 4:36 PM
    • 271 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    Locornwall
    I’m not necessarily getting it to save money, although I can’t throw unlimited money towards it.

    I really want the look and feel it can add at winter. I won’t use it everyday, probably just weekends when all the family are at home.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 6th Aug 19, 10:09 PM
    • 3,873 Posts
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    Ectophile
    The thing with a stove, is that once you've lit it, you won't get anything done for the rest of the evening. You'll just sit and toast yourself in front of the fire.


    They may be a bit messy, and there's all the work of bringing logs in, lighting the fire, and shoving in logs at intervals. But a central heating radiator has nothing on a real fire.



    When getting wood, there's a trade-off between how much work you want to do, and how much you want to pay. The majority of my wood is scrounged as green wood from various places. But it's up to me to transport it home, saw it into lengths, split it if necessary, and leave it to season for two years.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 6th Aug 19, 10:54 PM
    • 2,734 Posts
    • 4,111 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    My stove, flue and fireplace alterations were a bit less than 2.5K in summer 2014. Summer 2013 I had solar panels installed and together they mean that my annual gas bill for CH and HW is around £75. (That's a single person, with a regular guest in a 3 bed terrace.)


    I do occasionally buy briquets, but over a winter that's very few (£30-40? at most) just for convenient storage in the lounge and to adjust the mix I'm burning in the stove. It's not a scientific process: like making bread it's basic principles and adjusting the recipe and not something you should worry about.



    For the rest I scrounge wood, including pallets for kindling and the thicker stringers to get the fire going. It involves a bit of work, but as a distinctly lazy lass not something to worry about and it saves on the gym. I actually split a few rounds of ash today: imagined the face of the PM on each round and the job was a pleasure..


    You've reminded me to phone the sweep.Last two times he looked up the flue and said not to bother, but I'll probably have a precautionary sweep this year even if it's marginal.


    With all my costs: briquets, tools, sweep, a little petrol for the car loads of wood I collect etc. I allow £10 on my budget spreadsheet and that's generous. The last wood was from 400 yards down the road, the load before from next door!



    But as you can see from the thread above it's not for everyone.



    PS: I've even cooked on/in my stove and boiled a kettle, so it's always best to get a flat top one! New Forest chestnuts are gorgeous!
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 6th Aug 19, 11:01 PM
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    silverwhistle
    PS: I made a couple of log stores from old pallets. The logs for the year(s) after I keep in rounds or stacked in longer lengths to save space. That's all at the bottom of my terrace house garden and perhaps isn't for the anally inclined, but it's great for the wild life.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 6th Aug 19, 11:40 PM
    • 3,227 Posts
    • 4,182 Thanks
    FreeBear
    They may be a bit messy, and there's all the work of bringing logs in, lighting the fire, and shoving in logs at intervals.
    Originally posted by Ectophile
    That reminds me... Bringing logs in from the shed will also bring in quite a few spiders & other creepy crawlies. Back in February, I found a load of wasp beetles in the house on a daily basis. They had been happily lying dormant under the bark of some poplar and emerged from hibernation after a few hours indoors.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 7th Aug 19, 10:08 AM
    • 2,734 Posts
    • 4,111 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    I found some of my poplar susceptible to black rot under the bark, so had the enjoyably therapeutic task of de-barking it with a wall paper stripper. The robins in my garden had a wonderful time taking advantage of the exposed grubs!



    Once the wood is split though the only issue seems to be the odd woodlouse, but a quick tap together as you pick the logs out of the store sorts that.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Aug 19, 12:50 AM
    • 29,805 Posts
    • 102,899 Thanks
    Davesnave
    We have a modern, efficient, 5kW stove made in the UK, which is far better than the 8kW model we inherited here. With a bespoke limestone fireplace and slate hearth, our installation was about £3.2k and we're happy with our choices. No burns yet on the floor after 3 years, but we have a £20 Dunelm rug to take the brunt of that, if/when it happens.

    Unlke many here, we run our stove much of the winter 12 to 24hrs a day, mainly because we generate firewood on our smallholding and also receive payments in wood or other products, rather than money. So, the stove takes the place of oil central heating for much of the time, because it's cheaper, but we appreciate it wouldn't be for everyone.

    In winter, the living room receives considerable heat gain on many days from a conservatory, but when things are going the other way, the stove can cope with that too if we still want to work out there. It's flexibility is good, but as we sometimes slumber it, we expect to have the flue swept at least annually.

    Yes, theres a small amount of dust and the work to tend it, but no glass cleaning and ash removal is about every third day.


    If we had mains gas and lived in town, we'd still have a stove, but it would run on gas, not wood. We had one in our last house and it was the most sensible choice there. Just seasoning and storing enough wood would have been a challenge, whereas here we have plenty of space and outbuildings. There are some perfectly acceptable gas stoves made by the same people who manufacture wood burners.
    Things are more like they are right now than they've ever been.




    • CakeCrusader
    • By CakeCrusader 10th Aug 19, 2:29 PM
    • 1,024 Posts
    • 687 Thanks
    CakeCrusader
    I have one. I spend £120 on logs which last the whole of the winter (I have a cellar so I keep them there, but if you're in a new build you'll probably need a store outside), another £20/30 on heat logs (they heat the stove up faster so I'm not constantly stoking it, I also don't need kindling), £60 a year for the chimney sweep, that's about it. Mess wise it's not too bad. Scoop out the ash and place in a metal tin, HG stove cleaner's fantastic (smells though) and cleans the door like a dream, and I hoover up any bits of ash that I've missed. Some log burners will burn coal too, and if you have one with a flat top you should be able to brew coffee on it. The heat doesn't spread any further than one room, so if you're spending all day in your living room it's fine. I turn the central heating on an hour before bed so the bedrooms are warm, I can't say my gas bill's any cheaper though (it probably is but I haven't noticed).
    • BananaRepublic
    • By BananaRepublic 10th Aug 19, 6:41 PM
    • 1,462 Posts
    • 1,020 Thanks
    BananaRepublic
    I have gas CH and a Charnwood wood burner. I don’t use it much, winter weekends only, but I do like it. It is a luxury but a safety feature in case of a power cut, my boiler needs electricity to work.
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