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  • FIRST POST
    • myself321
    • By myself321 27th Sep 07, 10:05 PM
    • 398Posts
    • 26Thanks
    myself321
    halogen heater query
    • #1
    • 27th Sep 07, 10:05 PM
    halogen heater query 27th Sep 07 at 10:05 PM
    hi there

    are halogen heaters economic i am looking at one that has 3 bars with 350w per bar ?
Page 2
    • Mankysteve
    • By Mankysteve 23rd Nov 09, 11:43 PM
    • 4,115 Posts
    • 2,926 Thanks
    Mankysteve
    I think a sticky thread showing the disadvantage and advantages of each electrical form of heating would be bad idea for this forum as it seems to come up again and again. the problem with a halogen is that it will not heat a room as well if your going to moving around it would be better to have something that heats the entire room.I think its wrong to say any form of electrical heating is economical as they all cost a lot to run compared to gas central heating.
  • Captain Disaster
    What you are really asking is ......
    hi there

    are halogen heaters economic i am looking at one that has 3 bars with 350w per bar ?
    Originally posted by myself321
    What you really want to know is ....

    Am I going to feel warmer for a lower price than a using a standard convection heater ?

    The answer isn't a straightforward yes or no ..... convection heaters (because heat rises) heat the higher parts of a room first, then the heat "creeps down", you do get thermal currents but in general the higher parts of the room are warmer. So if you live in an old property with high ceilings a radiant heater could be a good idea. However if you move around in that property then you will often be out of the heat. (think about the difference in between standing in sunshine and shadow .... this is radiant heat.)

    Radiant heaters give off a bright glow, some people find this annoying, so you may just have to take pot luck and try one.

    hth
  • LynseyinLondon
    Why I ended up with both!
    I've been reading this forum with avid interest today as my gas central heating boiler is currently broken down, being 20 years old, and will soon be replaced with an all-new condensing combi for heat and water. (I knew when I moved house it would be on the cards pretty soon!)
    So meantime I decided on an oil filled rad having previously owned one, but on popping down to Argos I found a halogen one on half price offer.

    I have therefore returned home with the original choice of oil-filled electric rad and a halogen heater - and already I realise they have very different applications - as previous people have commented, the halogen is great for warming an individual sitting/standing in one spot - the oil filled one better for several hours' "background" heat. My advice, since both heat the environment at same cost (a fact I only learned today - the prospective purchase being what brought me to this forum earlier for info, good ol' internet) is: go for the more robust thermo-controlled oil-filled convector if you feel it is affordable at 60-130, but for an extra 17 (Nov '10) why not just add in a halogen one too! In terms of a quick warm glow I'm impressed with the halogen, and for the price I will just keep it as an emergency or booster heater - small, very lightweight....But be aware, nothing really beats GCH on long-term cost and performance if you are in a position to have it, especially now condensing boilers are the norm.
    As someone said, GCH radiators can be individually controlled too, you do not need to heat every room.
    Last edited by LynseyinLondon; 27-10-2010 at 10:04 PM.
  • Mr Glover Lover
    Halogen heaters = expensive!
    I always thought halogen heaters were cost efficient, however i've recently got an energy monitor form EON and it has provided some interesting results...

    I have just decided to put some heating on, without it my output was 480w. I turned on one 1200w halogen heater on 2 of the 3 bars and my output went up to 1.3kw! I turned it off and turned on my central heating and it was only 620w.

    No brainer!
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 13th Nov 10, 6:19 PM
    • 28,000 Posts
    • 13,851 Thanks
    Cardew
    I always thought halogen heaters were cost efficient, however i've recently got an energy monitor form EON and it has provided some interesting results...

    I have just decided to put some heating on, without it my output was 480w. I turned on one 1200w halogen heater on 2 of the 3 bars and my output went up to 1.3kw! I turned it off and turned on my central heating and it was only 620w.

    No brainer!
    Originally posted by Mr Glover Lover
    Not understood.

    If you switch on 2 bars it is an extra 800w so as expected your monitor read 1.3kW(1.28kW to be exact)

    Switch it heater off and it would drop down by 800w. That extra 140w would probably be accounted for by the pump.
  • Berger
    I keep hearing on here that gch is cheaper than my little halogen heater heating me here as I work from home.

    So should I have my gch on all day, heating the house? Is my boiler heating the house all day really cheaper than having 1 or 2 bars on my halogen heater in one room?!?

    (I can't turn off all my radiators, some are quite old and don't really turn off).

    Electric blanket sounds like an idea, though not very practical as I move around with my laptop & paperwork
  • Berger
    I always thought halogen heaters were cost efficient, however i've recently got an energy monitor form EON and it has provided some interesting results...

    I have just decided to put some heating on, without it my output was 480w. I turned on one 1200w halogen heater on 2 of the 3 bars and my output went up to 1.3kw! I turned it off and turned on my central heating and it was only 620w.

    No brainer!
    Originally posted by Mr Glover Lover
    Yes, that's your electricity. Your gas consumption is not factored in there.
  • GregKaye
    where the heat goes
    If halogen or other forms of directed bar heater are to be used then it is obviously important to consider what happens to all that expensive heat. Best to be heated you. Worst to be heated outside walls, ceilings and, in some cases, the floor. Somewhere in between it may not be so bad to gently supply heat to the freestanding furniture that you are using. Localised heat only works if it is kept local and this is is the main thing that may set halogen and bar heaters apart from other forms of heating.
    In comparison, inappropriately positioned radiators may generate problems in that they mainly operate by convection. This problem may be neutralised in the case that radiators are placed directly beneath the windows of the heated area. Freestanding (convectively operating) "radiators" placed in other locations, on the other hand, will greatly sponsor the heating of your roof. Convection currents generated when halogen heaters heat just one region of a large air space may also become an issue.
    • richardc1983
    • By richardc1983 3rd Jan 11, 6:00 PM
    • 1,981 Posts
    • 1,031 Thanks
    richardc1983
    Cheapest option is to have your gas central heating on if you have it and turn off all the radiators in the rooms you are not using just ensure you have 1 radiator turned on.

    This is the cheapest form.

    Halogen heaters deliver a nice heat as it is radiant heat and can be more comfortable than a fan or convector heater which heats the air which in turn heats you.
    If you found my post helpful, please remember to press the THANKS button! --->
  • KKKKP
    Ive had my Halogen Heater for 5 years. With Halogen heater i dont turn on the lights on as often, enough light comes out of the halogen heaters and it looks cosy even with 1 bar. thumps up for me,as gives out heat aswell as not having to switch my lights on
    Last edited by KKKKP; 03-02-2011 at 10:11 PM.
  • Gingertom
    The only room we heat is the lounge/diner and the best move I ever made was buying a cheap but actually unused pair of 90 x 90 curtains at a boot fair. Fixed a track to the ceiling so now in the evening we cut the room area in half.
  • p3pp3r5
    Be very careful with these type of heaters.

    A friend stood to close to one and was set on fire with life changing results.

    Oil filled are much safer and they all cost the same to run.
  • IainMacca
    Agreed - be careful with these heaters - I just threw 2 out yesterday because the internal wiring had physically burned out.

    I do use them but the cheap ones are a bit of a fire hazard imo.

    Cheers
  • StarSwoop
    Safety in a small studio
    My current convector cost around 16 from Wickes in March but has had a few iffy episodes lately and finally croaked this morning (it was making fizzing noises and sparks by the bit that usually just flashes each time it clicks on), leaving me with only an equally cheap and recently purchased fan heater from them but not giving me any problems when on for some 6 hours a day.
    Thing is, i need something that is safe for overnight use and contiuous use on weekends/ Xmas etc. Oil sounds safest but i cannot carry one home and need one asap. What's safer for a small room with wooden floors during these hours? Another convector or a Halogen?
  • RobbieJ
    With any type of electrical heater you get exactly the same amount of heat for the same running cost.
    Originally posted by Cardew
    Actually, this is a good approximation, but it is not strictly accurate.

    This statement would only be true if all electrical heaters were 100% efficient i.e. all the input electricity was directly converted into heat. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

    For example, if an electric heater produces light, it uses some of the electrical input as energy to produce the light, this is an "overhead" that makes it less than 100% efficient.

    Different methods of producing heat have different "overheads" and all electric heaters have their own particular "overhead" dependent upon their means and design.

    If you still can't follow this, just think about lighting a room. Using the same argument, it should not matter what method you use to light the room - if you use the same amount of electrical input, you will get the same amount of illumination. This is just not correct. In the case of lighting, the difference between using different methods was so great that legislation has been passed to prohibit certain inefficient light bulbs in an effort aimed at reducing the UK's carbon footprint.
    • ilikecookies
    • By ilikecookies 19th Jan 13, 1:44 PM
    • 196 Posts
    • 107 Thanks
    ilikecookies
    Actually, this is a good approximation, but it is not strictly accurate.

    This statement would only be true if all electrical heaters were 100% efficient i.e. all the input electricity was directly converted into heat. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

    For example, if an electric heater produces light, it uses some of the electrical input as energy to produce the light, this is an "overhead" that makes it less than 100% efficient.
    Originally posted by RobbieJ
    Interesting point.

    I've wondered how design factors into the equation too. I accept that in theory a 2kw oil-convection heater will cost the same to run as a 2kw halogen heater. However there are differences. For example I have two 2kw oil-convection heaters. They are different brands and different designs. I'm sure that one heats the room quicker than the other.

    I assume design does have an impact on their efficiency. For example, a newer style single radiator with fins throws out more heat than a old-style single radiator which doesn't have fins.
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 19th Jan 13, 1:54 PM
    • 20,595 Posts
    • 17,201 Thanks
    HappyMJ
    Actually, this is a good approximation, but it is not strictly accurate.

    This statement would only be true if all electrical heaters were 100% efficient i.e. all the input electricity was directly converted into heat. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

    For example, if an electric heater produces light, it uses some of the electrical input as energy to produce the light, this is an "overhead" that makes it less than 100% efficient.

    Different methods of producing heat have different "overheads" and all electric heaters have their own particular "overhead" dependent upon their means and design.

    If you still can't follow this, just think about lighting a room. Using the same argument, it should not matter what method you use to light the room - if you use the same amount of electrical input, you will get the same amount of illumination. This is just not correct. In the case of lighting, the difference between using different methods was so great that legislation has been passed to prohibit certain inefficient light bulbs in an effort aimed at reducing the UK's carbon footprint.
    Originally posted by RobbieJ
    All lamps produce heat and light. However, the light you see hits a surface and then the light energy converts into heat so they are 100% efficient at creating heat. They are inefficient in summer as heat is not wanted. In winter we need to use the central heating more to replace the lost heat so the savings you see on your electric bill aren't exactly the savings you get as more gas is used.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 19th Jan 13, 1:54 PM
    • 28,000 Posts
    • 13,851 Thanks
    Cardew
    Actually, this is a good approximation, but it is not strictly accurate.

    This statement would only be true if all electrical heaters were 100% efficient i.e. all the input electricity was directly converted into heat. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

    For example, if an electric heater produces light, it uses some of the electrical input as energy to produce the light, this is an "overhead" that makes it less than 100% efficient.

    Different methods of producing heat have different "overheads" and all electric heaters have their own particular "overhead" dependent upon their means and design.

    If you still can't follow this, just think about lighting a room. Using the same argument, it should not matter what method you use to light the room - if you use the same amount of electrical input, you will get the same amount of illumination. This is just not correct. In the case of lighting, the difference between using different methods was so great that legislation has been passed to prohibit certain inefficient light bulbs in an effort aimed at reducing the UK's carbon footprint.
    Originally posted by RobbieJ
    Fortunately it is the case and is absolutely accurate! Or at least a guy called Albert Einstein thought that it was the case.

    The clue is that "Energy cannot be created or destroyed"!

    All electrical heaters are 100% efficient.

    Put ten 100watt lamps in a room and you will get exactly the same amount of heat as a 1kW heater of any type - including fan heaters; even if the fan was using 50 watts.

    If your PC and monitor are using, say, 200watts, that produces as much heat as an electrical heater using 200 watts.

    The reason for legislation on lighting is that the purpose of light ing is just that - to provide light! In many cases the heat produced by lighting is a by-product and just not required - i.e. in summer or when heat is provided by cheaper means e.g. gas.

    If you can't follow this where to you think the electrical energy from the lights goes?
  • RobbieJ
    ... Or at least a guy called Albert Einstein thought that it was the case.

    The clue is that "Energy cannot be created or destroyed"!...
    Originally posted by Cardew
    Correct, but there is a whole electromagnetic spectrum of energy.
  • RobbieJ
    Love the avatar, HappyMJ
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