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  • FIRST POST
    • antwilson
    • By antwilson 27th Jun 18, 5:02 PM
    • 134Posts
    • 15Thanks
    antwilson
    Selling house - no viewings
    • #1
    • 27th Jun 18, 5:02 PM
    Selling house - no viewings 27th Jun 18 at 5:02 PM
    First time seller. We had 5 estate agents round before putting property our up for sale.

    1 valued property at 90-95, with a recommended list price of offers over 90.
    3 valued property at 90-95 with a recommended list price of 95k
    1 valued property at 95-100 with a recommended list price of 97.5k.

    We paid 90k 7 years ago, and most recent mortgage valuation 2 years ago was 93k.

    We listed for 95k and received no viewers in the first 4 weeks and were advised to reduce the property to 92.5k. 2 weeks later we had our first viewer weekend just gone, but estate agents haven't been able to contact viewer for feedback.

    Now at a loss of what else we can do, getting bored of waiting and was expecting a lot more viewers.

    Any suggestions - dont really want to reduce further as I feel at this price level it would have to be 10k+ over priced (which it definitely isnt!) to put viewers off.
Page 4
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 1:22 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    What is the reasoning behind it being advertised as in Scawthorpe when it is actually in Bentley? I looked at Scawthorpe on google maps and it seems to be a much nicer area with privately owned nice housing. Bentley on the other hand is just one huge council estate and not nearly so nice.



    I think your pricing is based on a 2 bed house in Scawthorpe not a 2 bed house in Bentley. Bentley is going to be 10 to 20k cheaper than Scawthorpe for a similarly sized house. In areas where there isn't a shortage of housing people will only buy on a big council estate like this if they can't afford anything better.



    People are not going to choose to live in Bentley if they can afford to live anywhere else. You can buy a 3 bed in Bentley for 80 to 90k so a two bed is going to be less than this. From the price comparisons it looks as if you paid too much for it when you bought it.



    In an area where there isn't a shortage of housing 2 beds are difficult to sell unless they are much cheaper than a 3 bed house.



    Will you be in negative equity if you have to market it at around 80k?
    • buggy_boy
    • By buggy_boy 3rd Jul 18, 1:27 PM
    • 555 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    buggy_boy
    The worst part is that a lot of posters who are supposedly "expert" and "experienced" are encouraging this nonsense
    Originally posted by Crashy Time
    Because it can make a huge difference, rooms can look a lot smaller if they are cluttered or the photo's are poorly taken, presenting a property in the best light is always going to get you more viewers..

    If you went to the supermarket and there was two bananas, one was a bit bruised and miss-shapen, and the other was not, I know which one 99% of people would go for... Obviously the price is a big factor...

    So actually the worst part is complete idiots that are desperate for a house price crash giving poor and misguided advice...
    Last edited by buggy_boy; 03-07-2018 at 1:34 PM.
    • letitbe90
    • By letitbe90 3rd Jul 18, 1:57 PM
    • 294 Posts
    • 347 Thanks
    letitbe90
    Because it can make a huge difference, rooms can look a lot smaller if they are cluttered or the photo's are poorly taken, presenting a property in the best light is always going to get you more viewers..

    If you went to the supermarket and there was two bananas, one was a bit bruised and miss-shapen, and the other was not, I know which one 99% of people would go for... Obviously the price is a big factor...

    So actually the worst part is complete idiots that are desperate for a house price crash giving poor and misguided advice...
    Originally posted by buggy_boy
    See this is where you wrong about the rooms looking small. I don't believe for a second any serious buyer takes photo's seriously. When it comes to room size, we want measurements, if the ad doesn't have them - we request them. Even then, we may even measure ourselves to double check. I couldn't give a monkey what kind of wide camera lens or technique they used to make the room look big and spacious.

    Also comparing banana purchase to house purchase is a bit rich. I may well pick a banana compared to another because it looks nicer, but I will never pick a house over another house because it was a bit more tidy or the photo's made it look better. That will never be a factor for me and neither should it for anyone.

    But please, carry on telling people that removing the trampoling from the garden will be their saving grace.

    Lastly, I am not a house price doomsayer. I think there may be some correction in London, but do not expect some crash incoming like the HPC group.

    Now realistic reasons you may not be getting viewings:

    1) Price too high
    2) Demand in area is not great
    3) Demand lowered due to people expecting house prices to drop in the area (be it true or not)
    4) New developments in area or surrounding area's piquing peoples interest, driving prices down further
    5) There is demand, your price is fine but your timing is unlucky. No suitable buyer is out there at this present time

    It reminds me of a property in Croydon once which was put on the market for 325k one week on an open day, but it didn't get any offers. It then had another open day a couple of weeks later and ended up getting multiple offers and ended up being sold for 350k. Luck/timing is an unfortunate fact of buying/selling.
    Last edited by letitbe90; 03-07-2018 at 2:12 PM.
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 3rd Jul 18, 2:16 PM
    • 485 Posts
    • 1,063 Thanks
    quantumlobster
    Whilst a good listing and ace photos won't sell a house, a bad listing and awful photos can certainly stop an awful lot of people from even looking at your property. It's all about getting prospective buyers over that initial hump.

    Of course the price has to be right too.
    • letitbe90
    • By letitbe90 3rd Jul 18, 2:23 PM
    • 294 Posts
    • 347 Thanks
    letitbe90
    Whilst a good listing and ace photos won't sell a house, a bad listing and awful photos can certainly stop an awful lot of people from even looking at your property. It's all about getting prospective buyers over that initial hump.

    Of course the price has to be right too.
    Originally posted by quantumlobster
    Bad photo's and an untidy or even a bit worn down house can equally attract buyers - who will feel they can win a property expecting people not to view it, noticing is a very small job to tidy/renovate the place. You know all that spotting a hidden gem and all that - everyone likes to feel like they can see through the superficial stuff. Obviously they are wrong to think they have a special eye and really what happens is everyone is on the same page.

    Anyway, there are obvious works which can be useful - for example seeing half the floor gone, kitchen units falling off or ruined carpets will obviously add to a buyer's mind (legitimately) the cost and time to replace those. However, a trampoline in the garden, a car in the driveway, the toy box in the bed room eetc - NO NO NO.
    Last edited by letitbe90; 03-07-2018 at 2:27 PM.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 2:41 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    See this is where you wrong about the rooms looking small. I don't believe for a second any serious buyer takes photo's seriously. When it comes to room size, we want measurements, if the ad doesn't have them - we request them. Even then, we may even measure ourselves to double check. I couldn't give a monkey what kind of wide camera lens or technique they used to make the room look big and spacious.

    Also comparing banana purchase to house purchase is a bit rich. I may well pick a banana compared to another because it looks nicer, but I will never pick a house over another house because it was a bit more tidy or the photo's made it look better. That will never be a factor for me and neither should it for anyone.

    But please, carry on telling people that removing the trampoling from the garden will be their saving grace.

    Lastly, I am not a house price doomsayer. I think there may be some correction in London, but do not expect some crash incoming like the HPC group.

    Now realistic reasons you may not be getting viewings:

    1) Price too high
    2) Demand in area is not great
    3) Demand lowered due to people expecting house prices to drop in the area (be it true or not)
    4) New developments in area or surrounding area's piquing peoples interest, driving prices down further
    5) There is demand, your price is fine but your timing is unlucky. No suitable buyer is out there at this present time

    It reminds me of a property in Croydon once which was put on the market for 325k one week on an open day, but it didn't get any offers. It then had another open day a couple of weeks later and ended up getting multiple offers and ended up being sold for 350k. Luck/timing is an unfortunate fact of buying/selling.
    Originally posted by letitbe90

    Was the Croydon house advertised as being in Purley when it was actually on a large council estate in Croydon? Would it still have had multiple offers if it had been?



    The OPs house is advertised as being in an area that it is not in and is in the middle of a massive council estate in an area of the country where people avoid having to buy ex council houses.
    • antwilson
    • By antwilson 3rd Jul 18, 3:15 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    antwilson
    What is the reasoning behind it being advertised as in Scawthorpe when it is actually in Bentley? I looked at Scawthorpe on google maps and it seems to be a much nicer area with privately owned nice housing. Bentley on the other hand is just one huge council estate and not nearly so nice.



    I think your pricing is based on a 2 bed house in Scawthorpe not a 2 bed house in Bentley. Bentley is going to be 10 to 20k cheaper than Scawthorpe for a similarly sized house. In areas where there isn't a shortage of housing people will only buy on a big council estate like this if they can't afford anything better.



    People are not going to choose to live in Bentley if they can afford to live anywhere else. You can buy a 3 bed in Bentley for 80 to 90k so a two bed is going to be less than this. From the price comparisons it looks as if you paid too much for it when you bought it.



    In an area where there isn't a shortage of housing 2 beds are difficult to sell unless they are much cheaper than a 3 bed house.



    Will you be in negative equity if you have to market it at around 80k?
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    Its marketed as Scawthorpe because that's where it is. Bentley is everything over the other side of the football field opposite.

    Marketing at 80k isnt going to happen, because its worth more & I couldn't afford to move @ 80k!

    Because it can make a huge difference, rooms can look a lot smaller if they are cluttered or the photo's are poorly taken, presenting a property in the best light is always going to get you more viewers..

    If you went to the supermarket and there was two bananas, one was a bit bruised and miss-shapen, and the other was not, I know which one 99% of people would go for... Obviously the price is a big factor...

    So actually the worst part is complete idiots that are desperate for a house price crash giving poor and misguided advice...
    Originally posted by buggy_boy
    Completely agree. After looking at houses ready for moving - cost is obviously a major factor but second are pictures. "Pictures say a 1000 words" and all that - if I see something I don't like, I don't read the details.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 4:16 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    Its marketed as Scawthorpe because that's where it is. Bentley is everything over the other side of the football field opposite.

    Marketing at 80k isnt going to happen, because its worth more & I couldn't afford to move @ 80k!



    Completely agree. After looking at houses ready for moving - cost is obviously a major factor but second are pictures. "Pictures say a 1000 words" and all that - if I see something I don't like, I don't read the details.
    Originally posted by antwilson

    I think you are going to have to get used to the idea that you are going to have to stay there. At the moment there is too much competition from bigger houses that are similarly priced that are not on that big council estate.


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-70921349.html I don't think this is timber framed is it?



    This is your competition https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-69639554.html The problem is that houses do not always go up in value. Sometimes they reduce in value.


    In order to sell a house on a council estate especially a big one like yours is on the price has to be cheaper than anything that is not on a council estate. At the moment your is priced so that houses that are bigger and not on a council estate are cheaper.


    It doesn't matter how much you want for a property. It is only worth what someone will pay your for it. It isn't worth the imaginary number that the estate agents come up with to get your business. It is only worth what someone will pay. The market in your area has decided that no one wants to pay your asking price for your house so there is basically nothing that anyone can do.
    • buggy_boy
    • By buggy_boy 3rd Jul 18, 6:00 PM
    • 555 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    buggy_boy
    See this is where you wrong about the rooms looking small. I don't believe for a second any serious buyer takes photo's seriously. When it comes to room size, we want measurements, if the ad doesn't have them - we request them. Even then, we may even measure ourselves to double check. I couldn't give a monkey what kind of wide camera lens or technique they used to make the room look big and spacious.

    Also comparing banana purchase to house purchase is a bit rich. I may well pick a banana compared to another because it looks nicer, but I will never pick a house over another house because it was a bit more tidy or the photo's made it look better. That will never be a factor for me and neither should it for anyone.

    But please, carry on telling people that removing the trampoling from the garden will be their saving grace.

    Lastly, I am not a house price doomsayer. I think there may be some correction in London, but do not expect some crash incoming like the HPC group.

    Now realistic reasons you may not be getting viewings:

    1) Price too high
    2) Demand in area is not great
    3) Demand lowered due to people expecting house prices to drop in the area (be it true or not)
    4) New developments in area or surrounding area's piquing peoples interest, driving prices down further
    5) There is demand, your price is fine but your timing is unlucky. No suitable buyer is out there at this present time

    It reminds me of a property in Croydon once which was put on the market for 325k one week on an open day, but it didn't get any offers. It then had another open day a couple of weeks later and ended up getting multiple offers and ended up being sold for 350k. Luck/timing is an unfortunate fact of buying/selling.
    Originally posted by letitbe90

    The photo's are the first impression, it will not sell the house but may stop people viewing, there are so many people that cannot do any DIY and will not entertain a property that is not in really good condition, and there are people that cannot see through the clutter.

    You sound like a diligent buyer but you are the 0.001%, ive never heard of anyone checking the measurements the estate agents give are actually accurate, yes people check their treasured piece of furniture fits, people can envisage living in a house a lot easier if it is less cluttered, its selling a lifestyle for a lot of people, I think you are way more open minded than most.

    Why do you think property developers can make so much money if what you say is true?
    • 51mm5
    • By 51mm5 3rd Jul 18, 7:07 PM
    • 161 Posts
    • 260 Thanks
    51mm5
    Bad photo's and an untidy or even a bit worn down house can equally attract buyers - who will feel they can win a property expecting people not to view it, noticing is a very small job to tidy/renovate the place. You know all that spotting a hidden gem and all that - everyone likes to feel like they can see through the superficial stuff. Obviously they are wrong to think they have a special eye and really what happens is everyone is on the same page.

    Anyway, there are obvious works which can be useful - for example seeing half the floor gone, kitchen units falling off or ruined carpets will obviously add to a buyer's mind (legitimately) the cost and time to replace those. However, a trampoline in the garden, a car in the driveway, the toy box in the bed room eetc - NO NO NO.
    Originally posted by letitbe90
    Nonsense, Surely dressing up the property and removing clutter will give a better impression of the property. Believe it or not, not everyone has the vision to see past clutter and furniture packed rooms/gardens. Why not show off the property at its best? Of course price is key but not presenting a place at its best is madness.
    • antwilson
    • By antwilson 3rd Jul 18, 7:31 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    antwilson
    I think you are going to have to get used to the idea that you are going to have to stay there. At the moment there is too much competition from bigger houses that are similarly priced that are not on that big council estate.


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-70921349.html I don't think this is timber framed is it?



    This is your competition https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-69639554.html The problem is that houses do not always go up in value. Sometimes they reduce in value.


    In order to sell a house on a council estate especially a big one like yours is on the price has to be cheaper than anything that is not on a council estate. At the moment your is priced so that houses that are bigger and not on a council estate are cheaper.


    It doesn't matter how much you want for a property. It is only worth what someone will pay your for it. It isn't worth the imaginary number that the estate agents come up with to get your business. It is only worth what someone will pay. The market in your area has decided that no one wants to pay your asking price for your house so there is basically nothing that anyone can do.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    One of the houses is in a different village which has generally lower prices and a bad area due to proximity to a park. The other is a shared ownership so not really suitable for comparison!!
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 7:48 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    One of the houses is in a different village which has generally lower prices and a bad area due to proximity to a park. The other is a shared ownership so not really suitable for comparison!!
    Originally posted by antwilson

    The point is that they are both sold. Buyers preferred them to your house. The market in your area says that these two houses are more attractive to buyers than your house is.



    You are not going to sell for the price you want if all the buyers prefer other houses even if they are shared ownership. If you look on Rightmove like I did you will see that there are lots of houses in your area that are sold. That means that all those people preferred other houses to yours. So what is it about your house that they don't like?
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 7:53 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    Nonsense, Surely dressing up the property and removing clutter will give a better impression of the property. Believe it or not, not everyone has the vision to see past clutter and furniture packed rooms/gardens. Why not show off the property at its best? Of course price is key but not presenting a place at its best is madness.
    Originally posted by 51mm5

    The problem with this property is the price and the location. You can't do anything about the location. Buyers are not stupid they can see that it is on a massive council estate but is priced as if it isn't.
    • antwilson
    • By antwilson 3rd Jul 18, 8:25 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    antwilson
    The problem with this property is the price and the location. You can't do anything about the location. Buyers are not stupid they can see that it is on a massive council estate but is priced as if it isn't.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    Not sure where you're getting 'Big massive council estate' from. Yes it's an ex council house, and is priced accordingly. Similar houses are 20k+ more expensive which aren't council estates. Not sure where your'e from to have a big complex about 'council estates' but in these areas every village has one. A nice quiet street. No Vicky pollards and only a couple of settee's in the street (not!)
    • BrassicWoman
    • By BrassicWoman 3rd Jul 18, 9:44 PM
    • 2,146 Posts
    • 8,282 Thanks
    BrassicWoman
    See this is where you wrong about the rooms looking small. I don't believe for a second any serious buyer takes photo's seriously. When it comes to room size, we want measurements, if the ad doesn't have them - we request them.
    Originally posted by letitbe90



    I don't because my brain is not capable of visualising distance.
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    • savingfortomorrow
    • By savingfortomorrow 3rd Jul 18, 10:22 PM
    • 663 Posts
    • 5,055 Thanks
    savingfortomorrow
    the positive-- you have a lovely clean well maintained house, it is in a great family friendly state ans overall is full of potential

    negatives the estate agent id hindering the sale. the photos of the lounge and bedrooms are at the worst angle. a good house displayed terribly. re do the photos asap. it is making it look bad. hid the ceiling in photo one and get a new agent.

    even if you take a 100 random photos with a blind-fold you would come out with superior to this estate agent,
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 10:59 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    Yes that's what we always believed, but the brick part between the houses is actually half/half (we both have outhouses in this section). The boundary runs straight down the middle.
    Originally posted by antwilson

    It also runs straight down the middle of what you are calling your driveway. You are parking your cars half on your land and half on the land belonging to your neighbour. To get round doing this your neighbour has created off street parking on their garden but that doesn't mean that they don't still own their part of the drive which you are treating as yours alone.



    I know this is the case because most of the other houses in your road have a fence running down the middle of this bit of land. Someone took this out but it won't change the ownership or any ROWs over it.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 3rd Jul 18, 11:12 PM
    • 6,193 Posts
    • 9,736 Thanks
    Cakeguts

    This is the picture that shows that it doesn't have off street parking and the OP is parking on the shared access. If you look at all the other houses in the road they either have a fence or a hedge down the middle of this place marking the boundary. On either side of the fence there is a footpath to the front door. I would suggest that there used to be a hedge down the middle of what looks like the driveway dividing it into two. It looks confusing because the neighbour has created their own offstreet parking on their front garden on the otherside of the gate to the footpath.



    I can't see why the council in selling off the OPs house would have changed the boundary down between the two houses giving a couple of feet more to the OPs house. What would be the point as originally neither house had a drive just a footpath with a dividing hedge.



    I think anyone looking at the house would be wise to assume that there is no offstreet parking.
    • antwilson
    • By antwilson 4th Jul 18, 5:41 AM
    • 134 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    antwilson
    This is the picture that shows that it doesn't have off street parking and the OP is parking on the shared access. If you look at all the other houses in the road they either have a fence or a hedge down the middle of this place marking the boundary. On either side of the fence there is a footpath to the front door. I would suggest that there used to be a hedge down the middle of what looks like the driveway dividing it into two. It looks confusing because the neighbour has created their own offstreet parking on their front garden on the otherside of the gate to the footpath.



    I can't see why the council in selling off the OPs house would have changed the boundary down between the two houses giving a couple of feet more to the OPs house. What would be the point as originally neither house had a drive just a footpath with a dividing hedge.



    I think anyone looking at the house would be wise to assume that there is no offstreet parking.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    As I keep telling you, I have extended the drive and therefore DO have parking on my side of the boundary. I park my car there every day!!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 4th Jul 18, 6:42 AM
    • 36,298 Posts
    • 22,353 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Who owns the brick part between the houses?

    The gate(s)/drives look like you do with the boundary being inline with the door/brick and the right side of pedestrian gate
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Yes that's what we always believed, but the brick part between the houses is actually half/half (we both have outhouses in this section). The boundary runs straight down the middle.
    Originally posted by antwilson
    That makes your drive very narrow at the house end.
    The cars in the google image are partly over the boundary.

    Further down the street you can see this better where some have put a fence up on the boundary..
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