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  • FIRST POST
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 5th Dec 16, 3:57 PM
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    Martyn1981
    On-grid domestic battery storage
    • #1
    • 5th Dec 16, 3:57 PM
    On-grid domestic battery storage 5th Dec 16 at 3:57 PM
    Hello!

    Right, as discussed elsewhere, battery storage for self generation (typically PV) is interesting (to some), and gathering momentum in the UK. So here's a thread to discuss it, and watch it develop.

    I've called it on-grid, as off-grid is so much more specialised. And domestic as commercial scale storage, or grid scale can be chatted about on the Green & Ethical energy issues thread.

    So, where are, well this article lists about 20 systems that are available or should be available soon:-

    Introducing CleanTechnica’s New Home Battery Overview Page

    Jumping straight in with personal opinions:-

    Economical - Not yet. Prices are falling fast, the range of products is expanding fast, and large numbers are being deployed in some countries, either because the price of leccy is high (Australia & Hawaii) or because subsidy schemes exist (Sweden & Germany).

    Where are we today. My needs are a 4kWh system. That's 4kWh of useable capacity, which would mean about 8kWh of lead acid (LA), or about 5kWh of lithium ion (Li-ion). My research has found batts in the high £2k and up range. I need the price to be nearer to £1.5k.

    The Tesla Powerwall II, installed is approx £6.5k, which works out at about £2.2k for 5kWh, but of course, it doesn't work quite like that, as smaller systems will cost proportionately more.

    Environmental - Tricky one this (to say the least). Until storage is needed, it's not environmental. Renewable energy (RE) generation currently displaces gas generation, which is a demand follower. Once gas generation is pushed down to zero (at times) we need storage, but we aren't there yet.

    However, to push gas generation down to zero, we need more RE, and to ensure it is viable/economic/profitable, we will need storage - chicken and egg situation.

    The advantage of storage to the environment, is to take peaks of RE and timeshift them to peaks in electricity demand. On a domestic level, this works quite well as PV generates during the day into the afternoon (or evening) depending on the month, so any stored leccy is available for the evening peak 5pm to 7pm.

    That's the background, and now here's a thread to discuss options, prices, economics, and watch things unfold. Enjoy.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
Page 1
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 5th Dec 16, 4:02 PM
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    Martyn1981
    • #2
    • 5th Dec 16, 4:02 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Dec 16, 4:02 PM
    And diving straight in, a forum friend (not MSE) has just agreed to buy a battery system.

    It's part of a DNO (District Network Operator) evaluation scheme (offer now closed), and is discounted down approx 25% to £2k. It's a 4kWh system (but actually 8kWh LA).

    It's to be installed on Friday this week, and he's happy for me to post info on how the system goes, with info on changes to leccy import.

    To save 'the haters' the time and trouble of posting loads of negatives, both he and I agree that it's not going to be economic, as it probably needs to be nearer £1.5k to breakeven, but he's happy to have a play and see how it all goes, and how it works (or doesn't!)
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 5th Dec 16, 4:14 PM
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    Martyn1981
    • #3
    • 5th Dec 16, 4:14 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Dec 16, 4:14 PM
    Centrica launches £19 million renewables and storage virtual market trial

    Centrica is to launch a £19 million pilot project which will assess the development of a virtual energy marketplace with renewables and storage at its heart.

    The programme will see Centrica’s distributed energy division work alongside Western Power Distribution, National Grid and the University of Exeter to develop a virtual market place for more than 150 homes and businesses in Cornwall.

    Starting next spring, Centrica will work with renewable generators and offer free smart technology upgrades to selected local residents, businesses and other large energy users. These will include new energy storage systems and micro-combined heat and power (CHP) systems.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • michaels
    • By michaels 7th Dec 16, 10:05 PM
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    michaels
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 16, 10:05 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Dec 16, 10:05 PM
    Seems to me if you were heating an indoor pool year round chp running when electricity spot prices were highest might work very well.

    In terms of domestic batts, does combining with both e7 and pv help the economics? Do any of the systems provide power during power cuts as for some this could be another addition to the value proposition.
    Cool heads and compromise
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 8th Dec 16, 8:13 AM
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    Martyn1981
    • #5
    • 8th Dec 16, 8:13 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Dec 16, 8:13 AM
    Seems to me if you were heating an indoor pool year round chp running when electricity spot prices were highest might work very well.

    In terms of domestic batts, does combining with both e7 and pv help the economics? Do any of the systems provide power during power cuts as for some this could be another addition to the value proposition.
    Originally posted by michaels
    Some form of CHP would probably benefit from batts. Let's say you had one of those Flow boilers, and it's working hard, heating the house whilst you are still in bed, then the batts could soak up the leccy?

    E7 and batts probably depends on how high your usage is. If the batts are replacing lots (most?) of your evening/nighttime consumption, then you might not want E7. Or, the opposite, if the batts allow your PV system to supply almost all of your daytime leccy, then a higher daytime rate won't matter, thus saving you money in the winter nights.

    I haven't read up on all the systems, but the few I've gone through in a bit more detail, like the Powerwall and Powervault do have a dedicated socket for emergency use in a blackout.

    I don't know if they could cope with the short (but huge) load when a freezer cycles, but you'd be able to charge phones, torches, laptop. Plug in a radio etc to keep in touch and stay safe.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 9th Dec 16, 3:02 PM
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    Martyn1981
    • #6
    • 9th Dec 16, 3:02 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Dec 16, 3:02 PM
    Here's an article and video on one battery system. It's a bit too 'adverty' but it is the result of a competition, and does give some useful visual aids regarding what to expect:-

    Powervault winner unveiled as SPP storage survey uncovers confidence in 2017 market potential

    Also, that model, is (I believe) the same one that my forum friend is getting today. So that might help with getting an idea what is being talked about, as we go forward.

    On a personal note. The article is quite positive about the economics of storage as we go into 2017. That may well be true, but I can't help thinking that price reductions may outweigh savings for a few years.

    Yes, that's a bit negative, and only a gut feeling, but I'm not sure a leap of faith is warranted yet.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • rugbyleaguesmate
    • By rugbyleaguesmate 9th Dec 16, 7:28 PM
    • 266 Posts
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    rugbyleaguesmate
    • #7
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:28 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:28 PM
    http://arstechnica.co.uk/cars/2016/12/tesla-store-chiswick-powerwall-2-price-details/?comments=1

    Tesla UK information.

    Mart would having a bigger array justify the 6400 for a Tesla, I can't see it but was wondering if by having a larger system to top up the battery then this would improve the payback for the battery?
    6.72kw Pv Ja Solar 280w * 24 panels, Solar Edge inverter, South facing no shading.
    South Lake District, delightful view of Morecambe Bay. Not Saving up for a battery too expensive

    July Solar target 769kw
    • Oscargrouch
    • By Oscargrouch 9th Dec 16, 8:21 PM
    • 3,467 Posts
    • 17,148 Thanks
    Oscargrouch
    • #8
    • 9th Dec 16, 8:21 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Dec 16, 8:21 PM
    Here's an article and video on one battery system. It's a bit too 'adverty' but it is the result of a competition, and does give some useful visual aids regarding what to expect:-

    Powervault winner unveiled as SPP storage survey uncovers confidence in 2017 market potential

    Also, that model, is (I believe) the same one that my forum friend is getting today. So that might help with getting an idea what is being talked about, as we go forward.

    On a personal note. The article is quite positive about the economics of storage as we go into 2017. That may well be true, but I can't help thinking that price reductions may outweigh savings for a few years.

    Yes, that's a bit negative, and only a gut feeling, but I'm not sure a leap of faith is warranted yet.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    I would agree with your comment 'Mart': looking at the video, it is clearly a sales pitch; looking at it from other perspectives, whacking in all surplus energy into batteries; or for some rather than heating hot water (otherwise done by Gas) would be financial suicide. Too many questions for me, the main one; how long would the batteries last when you switch on the micro & oven at the same time after dark using in excess of 3-4 kW when you have, in my case a 2.5 kWp system that today generated 1.3 kWh & 1.24 kWh was used within the house on base usage? Sorry, I may be out of touch, but I am of the opinion that batteries for any domestic <4kWp system is the wrong tree to be embarking up (more so, if you have the luxury of an immersion heater for hot water and use items such as an iBoost)....
    2.5 kWp PV system, SSW facing, 45 Deg Roof. ABB Inverter, Monitor: 'Wattson'.
    Reg. for FIT Nov 2011. "It's not what you generate; it's how you use it that matters". One very clean Vauxhall Diesel Sri, £30.00 Road Tax

    Definition of 'O's = kWh/kWp (kWh = your daily & accurate Generation figure) (kWp = the rated output of your PV Panels).
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 9th Dec 16, 9:26 PM
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    Martyn1981
    • #9
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:26 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:26 PM
    http://arstechnica.co.uk/cars/2016/12/tesla-store-chiswick-powerwall-2-price-details/?comments=1

    Tesla UK information.

    Mart would having a bigger array justify the 6400 for a Tesla, I can't see it but was wondering if by having a larger system to top up the battery then this would improve the payback for the battery?
    Originally posted by rugbyleaguesmate
    Hiya. To start here's a link to the Tesla GB site with the £6.4k price and specs of the PWII

    https://www.tesla.com/en_GB/powerwall

    Next, how much will a battery save you? I don't know if there's a cleverer way of working this out, so I'm going to repeat something I've posted elsewhere (not sure where now), on how I calculated my potential savings of 900-1,000kWh pa. Here goes:-

    Summer. I've got tons of generation, upto 34kWh in a single day, and an average of about 20kWh/day. However, my import is only 2.5kWh/day, so the most I can save is 2.5kWh x 90 days = 225kWh.

    Winter. Opposite of Summer (No, really!). I've got lots of import, upto 7kWh/day in December. However, my generation is lower, perhaps 3kWh/day December, so export probably ranges from 1 to 2 kWh. So the most I can save is 1.5kWh x 90 days = 135kWh.

    Spring/Autumn. Lots of import 4-5kWh, and lots of export (in excess of 4-5kWh) on average*. So the most I can save is 4.5kWh x 180 days = 810kWh.

    Total potential savings 1,170kWh pa.

    However, taking that * into account, means that some days in the Spring and Autumn I won't generate enough in bad weather, so I'd guesstimate a figure of 1,000kWh as a max.

    The figures also suggest to me that a battery capacity of 4kWh (available capacity) is enough for my needs.

    Note:
    1. For the winter there will be bad days with no export, but there will also be good days with lots of export, but less than the battery capacity, so this should balance out.
    2. In the summer there may be bad days, but days of less than 10kWh (more than I need) are very, very rare, so ignored.
    3. 4kWh battery capacity will be enough for 4-5kWh of daily use in the spring/autumn as some of that savings will be from micro battery cycles throughout the day as demand and supply fluctuate (eg clouds).

    So, what does all that mean to you, not a lot probably, it doesn't mean a lot to me. But hopefully it shows that we all individually need to look at our generation, import and estimated export, to make a calculated guess at what our potential annual import savings will be.

    From there, multiply the savings by your import price for an annual saving. You might need to deduct the export rate, but this will depend on changes to govt policy, and the amount you export. I currently export about 900kWh pa more than I get paid for, so I can value all my savings at import rates regardless.

    I'd also multiple by 10, for the number of years to give you a breakeven price on the kit, assuming you invest in something that has a 10yr warranty.

    Back to the question, does more PV help justify the battery investment. I suppose so, as more export means more potential for storage, but you need to ask some crucial questions first:

    1. Is the system so big that it's supplying lots of your leccy needs (such as my summer potential being small). A large PV system may have reduced your import so much that a large battery (or potentially any battery) isn't needed.
    2. Something michales raised, what about E7? If the large PV system is handling most of the daytime need, then E7 with cheaper nightime leccy might be a better deal.
    3. What about an EV in the future? This would throw everything out, and require new calcs, but probably supports large PV, batts and E7.

    These are personal musings, unsupported at this stage, so we all need to ponder how this will work, and see how folk with storage get on. [In other words, I don't really know what I'm talking about, so don't blame me!]
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 9th Dec 16, 9:40 PM
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    Martyn1981
    I would agree with your comment 'Mart': looking at the video, it is clearly a sales pitch; looking at it from other perspectives, whacking in all surplus energy into batteries; or for some rather than heating hot water (otherwise done by Gas) would be financial suicide. Too many questions for me, the main one; how long would the batteries last when you switch on the micro & oven at the same time after dark using in excess of 3-4 kW when you have, in my case a 2.5 kWp system that today generated 1.3 kWh & 1.24 kWh was used within the house on base usage? Sorry, I may be out of touch, but I am of the opinion that batteries for any domestic <4kWp system is the wrong tree to be embarking up (more so, if you have the luxury of an immersion heater for hot water and use items such as an iBoost)....
    Originally posted by Oscargrouch
    Hiya Oscar. In the case of the PowerVault, it can supply 1.2kW, so would only support the 3-4kW draw. However the PWII can supply 5kW (7kW briefly). So you'd need to consider both size of the battery and potential needs, though personally I'd consider sustained demand, rather than worry about shorter peaks.

    However, for smaller PV systems, I think you are dead right. Until prices drop right down, especially for smaller batts, it's not going to be worth considering.

    But a potential candidate might be the Enphase battery as that comes in modular units of 1.2kWh, and each has a micro-inverter supplying up to 270W. So 4 units would give you 4.8kWh and 1.1kW.

    This seems like a nice all round package, and you can start small and keep adding batts. I don't know if this happened, but in early 2016 Enphase hoped to ship and sell 70,000 units in Australia, so this might be one to watch.

    Good news, you'd get loads of use out of a single unit, with it doing lots of micro-cycles through the day.

    Bad news, I don't know the price, but for one (small) unit expect it to be proportionately more than the PWII.

    So an I-boost is far simpler and easier at the moment.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Dec 16, 10:49 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Ffu 1
    (That's forum friend update 1 .... just in case!)

    Right, the system went in last Friday. No problems. Some initial concern that the Immersun came on, but turns out the Powervault has a 60s 'soft shutdown' from 1,200W discharge, and his Immersun jumped in to grab the export.

    Some background, the PV system is 3kWp, split roughly 2/3 south + 1/3 west.

    Obviously weather not great lately, and performance this time of year will be low, but the monitoring software shows the system busy with lots of charging and discharging.

    Mch onwards will probably be more interesting when generation (and available export) picks up, and the system starts to dent import. It will also be interesting to see how much use the Immersun now gets, as high value leccy storage comes before lower value heat storage.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 18th Dec 16, 3:25 PM
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    Martyn1981
    News
    Demand side virtual power station and storage:

    World’s Largest Virtual Power Plant Trial A Big Hit With SA Consumers

    AGL Energy’s delivery of what would be the world’s largest virtual power plant – in South Australia – looks set to come in “well ahead of schedule,” after the utility announced on Thursday that it had already sold out its first round of 150 connected battery storage systems, with 350 second-phase battery systems now up for grabs.

    AGL first announced plans to develop the ambitious VPP project in August – a centrally controlled network of 1,000 residential and business battery storage systems with a combined total of 7MWh capacity that would both store rooftop solar power and help manage grid stability in the state.
    The 350 batteries on offer in the second phase of the trial will be available to AGL customers who live in Metropolitan Adelaide and meet the eligibility criteria, AGL said.

    These customers will be able to purchase the Sunverge 11.6kWh battery at $3,849, which includes hardware, software and monitoring services and installation. This battery also includes 50 per cent more capacity than the first offer battery – customers who purchased a battery in the first round will be able to upgrade to the 11.6kWh unit at no extra cost.
    Assuming that's A$3,849, then that's a 11.6kWh batt installed for £2,250. I'd have one.

    Even at $3,849 it's still 'only' £3,079, so quite a lot cheaper than the Tesla PWII.

    Certainly shows what is possible if all parties that benefit share the costs.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Exiled Tyke
    • By Exiled Tyke 19th Dec 16, 8:10 AM
    • 370 Posts
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    Exiled Tyke
    Demand side virtual power station and storage:

    World’s Largest Virtual Power Plant Trial A Big Hit With SA Consumers





    Assuming that's A$3,849, then that's a 11.6kWh batt installed for £2,250. I'd have one.

    Even at $3,849 it's still 'only' £3,079, so quite a lot cheaper than the Tesla PWII.

    Certainly shows what is possible if all parties that benefit share the costs.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Progress is finally made. Martyn finally finds a deal acceptable to his wallet! Now let's hope it's not too much longer for similar pricing to reach our shores.
    Install 28th Nov 15, 3.3kW, (11x300LG), SolarEdge, SW. W Yorks.
    Install 2 Sept, 600W SSE
    Solax 6.3kW battery
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 23rd Dec 16, 4:14 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Ffu 2
    Nice surprise. On Thursday the weather was nice and my FF and family went out. Generation was 4kWh, and the monitoring software suggests ~3.5kWh was diverted into the batts.

    Pretty good going for the time of year, and shows how the system works and can save on import.

    @ET Yep, count me in, and it is Aussie dollars so £2.2k for 12kWh. Fingers crossed one of the DNO's for a PV'er on here decides on a trial. I'd probably get excluded as I'd get overexcited and annoy them!
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 24th Dec 16, 3:57 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Just back from a Xmas visit to some friends, and have to share an idea that was suggested. My mate is a builder, but one of those folk who can see round a problem, or view it from all angles.

    He asked me jokingly when I was going to get a battery, and later on asked why the Severn Barrage isn't happening. He then put the two ideas together and said, 'perhaps in the future we'll all have batteries in Cardiff and then charge them off the tidal lagoon?'.

    Well .... my head nearly exploded. Is that a perfect solution or not, my mind can't cope.

    Here's the reasoning.
    You know when it's going to generate (almost irrelevant) and that it will be twice per day. So intermittent, but predictable.
    As it's twice a day, you can half the battery size.
    The battery cost could be heavily subsidised (shared) by Western Power Distribution (the DNO) as this would eliminate all peak loads and save them money.
    So the household chips in £x and gets a batt that charges up say 5kWh (x2) per day at a low leccy price, then you pay the normal rate for any extra. A bit like E7, perhaps E4by2 (well he is a builder!)

    If the cheap leccy was say 5p less, then that could save you £180pa at 10kWh per day.

    Sorry for the waffle, but the idea interested me. I'm trying to think of another form of RE that would really benefit from such a partnership?
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • tunnel
    • By tunnel 25th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    • 2,581 Posts
    • 7,978 Thanks
    tunnel
    He asked me jokingly when I was going to get a battery, and later on asked why the Severn Barrage isn't happening. He then put the two ideas together and said, 'perhaps in the future we'll all have batteries in Cardiff and then charge them off the tidal lagoon?'.

    Well .... my head nearly exploded. Is that a perfect solution or not, my mind can't cope.

    Here's the reasoning.
    You know when it's going to generate (almost irrelevant) and that it will be twice per day. So intermittent, but predictable.
    As it's twice a day, you can half the battery size.
    The battery cost could be heavily subsidised (shared) by Western Power Distribution (the DNO) as this would eliminate all peak loads and save them money.
    So the household chips in £x and gets a batt that charges up say 5kWh (x2) per day at a low leccy price, then you pay the normal rate for any extra. A bit like E7, perhaps E4by2 (well he is a builder!)

    If the cheap leccy was say 5p less, then that could save you £180pa at 10kWh per day.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Oh dear Mart,
    I don't live anywhere near Kardiff and wouldn't be able to access such a scheme, so anyone no-where near would be subsidising those that are.......Monbiot part 2?
    2 kWp SEbE , 2kWp SSW & 2.5kWp NWbW.....in sunny North Derbyshire
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 25th Dec 16, 5:45 PM
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    • 14,685 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    Oh dear Mart,
    I don't live anywhere near Kardiff and wouldn't be able to access such a scheme, so anyone no-where near would be subsidising those that are.......Monbiot part 2?
    Originally posted by tunnel
    Don't worry T, Chuckles the Troll might get upset, but my choice of 'subsidised' is technically wrong, as per my brackets of 'shared'.

    What I'm suggesting is that all the beneficiaries share the cost (household, DNO and NG), so no actual subsidies, just a smaller cost for each party, which would hopefully speed up viability.

    Let's say 1 in 5 households near the Cardiff lagoon had such a system, then you might knock 20% off the evening peak, reducing it down to daytime levels. I assume that top 20% costs far more than just any 20%, as leccy gets more expensive as you ramp up supply, bringing the less economical generators on line.

    If you had a number of these schemes dotted all over the UK, you could reduce the whole national peak by a few percent, it may only be a few percent but those will be expensive percents...

    It's probably just a silly idea, but I was trying to wrap it all into a nice bundle that supports all aspects, so it encourages the rollout of the tidal lagoons, gets storage deployed faster (with shared costs), reduces peak demand/pricing and adds an extra RE technology to the mix, and the more types we have, the less likely we are to be bored by endless cries of 'PV doesn't generate at night' ...... possibly!

    Lastly, I appreciate that generation will vary between the extremes (neap to spring tides), but even at the lower end, it would still help.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 25th Dec 16, 6:01 PM
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    Martyn1981
    This video pretty much explains everything about the idea of home batts. It's an Australian video, and therefore the figures are a bit different eg a house getting 97% of its leccy from PV or battery. But all the ideas are there, and some interesting technology, even the Aussie system of buying battery leccy in times of need.

    The new home batteries
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • tunnel
    • By tunnel 25th Dec 16, 6:33 PM
    • 2,581 Posts
    • 7,978 Thanks
    tunnel
    Don't worry T, Chuckles the Troll might get upset, but my choice of 'subsidised' is technically wrong, as per my brackets of 'shared'.

    What I'm suggesting is that all the beneficiaries share the cost (household, DNO and NG), so no actual subsidies, just a smaller cost for each party, which would hopefully speed up viability.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    It was just a bit of Christmas leg pulling but just for fun, maybe our village could tap into the very large wind turbine that's been positioned on the outskirts of the village. No need to worry about peak demand,unless the wind stops blowing then it's down to solar/coal/nuclear....etc etc
    2 kWp SEbE , 2kWp SSW & 2.5kWp NWbW.....in sunny North Derbyshire
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 25th Dec 16, 6:43 PM
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    Martyn1981
    It was just a bit of Christmas leg pulling but just for fun, maybe our village could tap into the very large wind turbine that's been positioned on the outskirts of the village. No need to worry about peak demand,unless the wind stops blowing then it's down to solar/coal/nuclear....etc etc
    Originally posted by tunnel
    Was it a turkey leg you were pulling?

    Tell you what, when I've signed up, you get a nice big extension lead then pop your plug in my socket.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
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