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Results: Do you use a Dishwasher or do you manually wash your Dishes?

Dishwasher

62.32% • 43 votes

Manual Wash

37.68% • 26 votes

You may not vote on this poll

69 votes in total.

  • FIRST POST
    • Diego Francis
    • By Diego Francis 11th Nov 19, 9:09 AM
    • 29Posts
    • 16Thanks
    Diego Francis
    Manual wash or Dishwasher? Here's a money saving tip to use less water manually.
    • #1
    • 11th Nov 19, 9:09 AM
    Manual wash or Dishwasher? Here's a money saving tip to use less water manually. 11th Nov 19 at 9:09 AM
    Added a poll just for curiosity's sake. Personally I don't understand why the average homeowner needs a dishwasher. You're using electricity to heat up water as well as water from your mains so you essentially have a secondary boiler in your house specifically for washing dishes that don't always do a great job at actually cleaning them.

    Lately I've been trying to reduce the amount of water used when manually washing the dishes, in a sink.

    I've come up with this strategy that may be good practice for those of you who need to get your water bills down.

    Grab your kettle, pop it under the tap, now run the hot water tap.
    Touch the tap and wait till it's hot. Once it is. Turn the tap off. You shouldn't have filled the kettle, in theory, but this may vary depending on how efficient your boiler is.

    Now pop your kettle back on its plynth, or hob if you have one of those types, and set it off boiling.

    Now the tricky part.

    Get all your cutlery, drop it into the sink. Push the plug into the sinkhole.

    Now starting with the glasses first, scrub with a scourer sponge the glasses with fairy liquid, or similar detergent, I use Aldi's own.

    Next scrub the dishes, plates or mugs that have the least 'dirt' on them. Keep scrubbing in this order, from least 'dirty' to the 'dirtiest'. Leave pots and pans last.

    So far you'll have soapy dishes that are quite messy and partially dry.
    Now turn your hot water tap back on, let it trickle.
    Now rinse the items you've just scrubbed and pop them in the drainer.
    The rinsed soapy water should collect in the sink barely submerging your cutlery.

    Now scrub your cutlery using this water to help remove the tough stains and 'dirt'.

    Take them out of the sink and place your pans or pots in, run the tap again, let it trickle, rinse your cutlery and pop it in the drainer. Turn the tap off again.

    Now your kettle has boiled, pour some detergent into the pot/ pan, give it a light scrub, best to use a second scourer dedicated to this part only, then pour in some of your boiled water.

    Leave to soak for a bit. When you return, lift the pans out of the sink, scrub them clean and rinse with cold water until the bulk of the suds have come off. Pop upsidedown in your sink to drain or on your drainer if you have room.

    Empty your water.

    Now I know it comes over that I've just told you how to wash dishes and I know you're not a person who sucks eggs. The reason why I wrote it this way to hopefully ignite a little spark in that lightbulb of yours.

    You've probably just realised that this method uses far less water. So much less than running the tap to get it warm - cold water wasted until heated up.
    So much less than filling a sink - usually too much water which gets dirty fast which is essentially a bath of slime that your coating your dishes with.
    So much less water than a dishwasher with far better results.

    'But you're using a kettle which is no more efficient than using the heater in a dishwasher' yeah in theory you're right, however, that kettle of water shouldn't be full and whatever you have left over you can make yourself a brew or prep some noodles. Can't do that with dishwasher water.

    From my own experience I've found by being stringent with how much water I use for washing up, it's actually made me realise how much I used to waste all the time.

    Now I have trouble getting the rest of the family on board with this. Mainly because it's so tedious and anal but the good news is now that I'm insisting on doing the dishes myself, the misses can keep her feet up after dinnertime now so win win.

    I don't have any figures or statics for savings made. Only been doing this for a month but I believe I am saving already. I'm not using the boiler for as long to heat up my water. I'm not wasting litres of water. And I'm utilising what water is usually wasted for other things.

    Bonus, if you don't have heavily stained items to wash and don't fancy a brew, keep the water in the kettle for the next time you need hot water or just pour it over your plants etc. The above is just one example of many possibilities.

    Post a comment and let this community know what you think and if you've saved money with this method. Hope it's not too painstaking for you to accomplish and more importantly I hope you do get money back.
Page 2
    • easy
    • By easy 15th Dec 19, 4:49 PM
    • 2,340 Posts
    • 2,754 Thanks
    easy
    The breakfast dishes usually consist of a couple of mugs, a couple of plates and a couple of knives.

    Hardly taxing to wash up. I wash them while the OH is out with the dog.

    The evening meal dishes vary admittedly but we still find it easier to wash them up as we use them.

    We really wouldn't have bothered with a dishwasher were it not for the hole in the kitchen of the new house where one fits.

    Same as we don't find a microwave a necessity. We dont have one as we never used the last one and it took up work space.
    Originally posted by RelievedSheff
    Hey, it's your life ... But I'm afraid I'd be pretty sad to think that I couldn't find anything more rewarding to do than stand and wash dishes, given that there IS a dishwasher there !! But then I work full time, and mourn the fact that I don't have the time to read all the books I want, or take on interesting hobbies.
    I'm guessing you are retired .
    I try not to get too stressed out on the forum. I won't argue, i'll just leave a thread if you don't like what I say.
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 2nd Jan 20, 8:49 AM
    • 3,316 Posts
    • 2,105 Thanks
    t0rt0ise
    So you are making tea or your pot noodle with water from the hot tap. Just no. I couldn't do that as it's not drinking water. Depends on your water system I suppose but for me, no.
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 2nd Jan 20, 5:22 PM
    • 3,023 Posts
    • 4,243 Thanks
    Robisere
    I'm guessing, OP, that you do not live in a Hard Water Area.

    I wash and OH wipes, it takes very little time even after a big meal with lots of pots and pans. Our water is so hot that I have to leave it until I can put my hands in it*, and we have a gas condenser boiler which also heats the radiators. The whole process uses little electricity and gas, which means cheaper energy cost over time. And we have a good old natter whilst doing something together.

    My grandson lives alone in his own flat, walks about a mile to and from work and had a dishwasher for two years. When it broke down, he was waiting ages for someone to fix it, then checked and compared his energy usage over the last few years, to discover that the 2 years of dishwasher use took more in actual KWhours. So he plans to sell the dishwasher when it's fixed, if the quoted repair is the same as it was. Meanwhile, he leaves breakfast pots until dinner is eaten, then washes the lot manually.

    *Even though I have inherited my mother's ability to withstand fairly hot water on my hands.
    I think this job really needs
    a much bigger hammer.
    • RelievedSheff
    • By RelievedSheff 3rd Jan 20, 8:55 AM
    • 1,098 Posts
    • 1,135 Thanks
    RelievedSheff
    Hey, it's your life ... But I'm afraid I'd be pretty sad to think that I couldn't find anything more rewarding to do than stand and wash dishes, given that there IS a dishwasher there !! But then I work full time, and mourn the fact that I don't have the time to read all the books I want, or take on interesting hobbies.
    I'm guessing you are retired .
    Originally posted by easy
    No we both work full time and are out of the house for 11 hours a day!

    It takes less than a couple of minutes to hand wash the few dishes that we create in a morning.

    I would find it pretty sad if my life was that hectic that I didn't have a couple of minutes to wash a couple of pots!
    • RelievedSheff
    • By RelievedSheff 3rd Jan 20, 8:58 AM
    • 1,098 Posts
    • 1,135 Thanks
    RelievedSheff
    I'm guessing, OP, that you do not live in a Hard Water Area.

    I wash and OH wipes, it takes very little time even after a big meal with lots of pots and pans. Our water is so hot that I have to leave it until I can put my hands in it*, and we have a gas condenser boiler which also heats the radiators. The whole process uses little electricity and gas, which means cheaper energy cost over time. And we have a good old natter whilst doing something together.

    My grandson lives alone in his own flat, walks about a mile to and from work and had a dishwasher for two years. When it broke down, he was waiting ages for someone to fix it, then checked and compared his energy usage over the last few years, to discover that the 2 years of dishwasher use took more in actual KWhours. So he plans to sell the dishwasher when it's fixed, if the quoted repair is the same as it was. Meanwhile, he leaves breakfast pots until dinner is eaten, then washes the lot manually.

    *Even though I have inherited my mother's ability to withstand fairly hot water on my hands.
    Originally posted by Robisere
    We had family over for a few days over Christmas so our dishwasher did get used a lot while they were here. There was a noticeable spike in energy consumption for the days they were with us which can only have been the dishwasher as that is the only thing we used that we don't normally use so often.
    • nick74
    • By nick74 4th Jan 20, 10:37 AM
    • 408 Posts
    • 332 Thanks
    nick74
    We had family over for a few days over Christmas so our dishwasher did get used a lot while they were here. There was a noticeable spike in energy consumption for the days they were with us which can only have been the dishwasher as that is the only thing we used that we don't normally use so often.
    Originally posted by RelievedSheff
    Presumably though if you'd washed all of the extra pots by hand you would have still noticed a similar spike in energy usage due to all of the hot water it would have taken?
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 4th Jan 20, 11:42 AM
    • 12,542 Posts
    • 33,453 Thanks
    suki1964
    We had family over for a few days over Christmas so our dishwasher did get used a lot while they were here. There was a noticeable spike in energy consumption for the days they were with us which can only have been the dishwasher as that is the only thing we used that we don't normally use so often.
    Originally posted by RelievedSheff
    So none of then bathed or showered, used any gadgets, had lights on. in bedrooms?
    if you lend someone 20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • RelievedSheff
    • By RelievedSheff 6th Jan 20, 1:15 PM
    • 1,098 Posts
    • 1,135 Thanks
    RelievedSheff
    Presumably though if you'd washed all of the extra pots by hand you would have still noticed a similar spike in energy usage due to all of the hot water it would have taken?
    Originally posted by nick74
    Heating water via gas is a damn sight cheaper than heating it via electric!
    • RelievedSheff
    • By RelievedSheff 6th Jan 20, 1:17 PM
    • 1,098 Posts
    • 1,135 Thanks
    RelievedSheff
    So none of then bathed or showered, used any gadgets, had lights on. in bedrooms?
    Originally posted by suki1964
    We were out of the house for most of each day so gadgets were literally just a couple of hours of phone charging extra and I doubt 1 extra LED bulb in the bedroom used at bedtime used the amount of extra electricity we have used over that few days!

    They did use the bath but that would show up as a spike in gas consumption not electric!
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 6th Jan 20, 2:24 PM
    • 12,542 Posts
    • 33,453 Thanks
    suki1964
    We were out of the house for most of each day so gadgets were literally just a couple of hours of phone charging extra and I doubt 1 extra LED bulb in the bedroom used at bedtime used the amount of extra electricity we have used over that few days!

    They did use the bath but that would show up as a spike in gas consumption not electric!
    Originally posted by RelievedSheff

    My point being that having a houseful of guests does bring extra costs and the dishwasher being run more is just one of those costs
    if you lend someone 20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • couriervanman
    • By couriervanman 10th Jan 20, 8:11 PM
    • 873 Posts
    • 1,579 Thanks
    couriervanman
    OP......just seen you post......you need to get out more
    • jayniee1964
    • By jayniee1964 18th Jan 20, 11:48 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    jayniee1964
    Dishwasher as just got such a busy life, but after reading the comments i might try washing manually to save a few coins x
    • Blackbeard of Perranporth
    • By Blackbeard of Perranporth 20th Jan 20, 6:12 PM
    • 6,508 Posts
    • 38,214 Thanks
    Blackbeard of Perranporth
    Dishwasher. It only heats the water it needs! Hence cheaper.
    Cardiac Arrest - Electrical - Patient unconscious! Heart Attack - Plumbing - Patient conscious!
    Defibrillators Cannot Cure a Heart Attack!
    • twopenny
    • By twopenny 23rd Jan 20, 9:44 PM
    • 44 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    twopenny
    I'm on a water meter for the first time.
    I worked out it takes 2-3ltrs of cold water to run through before the hot arrives. Using a large plastic kitchen jug I run the cold water into that. Tip it into the water butt outside for use in the garden or outdoor cleaning while washing up bowl fills. Wash or wash up with hot water. Tip cooled water straight onto garden, pavers or car. Haven't killed either yet

    No trouble or extra hassle at all.

    Me, the dishes and the garden are clean. My bills are so low the company dropped the monthly cost to the minium and commented on the lack of waste water - so I had to explain :-)
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