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  • FIRST POST
    • ka7e
    • By ka7e 9th Oct 19, 6:18 PM
    • 2,506Posts
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    ka7e
    0 WOW
    Induction Hob
    • #1
    • 9th Oct 19, 6:18 PM
    0 WOW
    Induction Hob 9th Oct 19 at 6:18 PM
    I'm re-fitting my kitchen and need all new appliances, primarily a double oven and an induction hob. I know what I want in terms of an oven, but I am new to induction.


    I gather I need a hard-wired hob to get the most oomph in terms of using multiple zones. I think I'm going to need a good bridging function as I often use large pans and I'm used to the fast reaction of a gas hob. Are there any other functions I need to look out for?



    Every brand has similar advertising blurb, so I'd like some user's recommendations. please!
    "Cheap", "Fast", "Right" -- pick two.
Page 1
    • gardenmaker
    • By gardenmaker 12th Oct 19, 11:12 PM
    • 16 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    gardenmaker
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 19, 11:12 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 19, 11:12 PM
    An induction hob needs its own circuit from your fuse board

    If your induction hob will be using up to 32 amps then that is one circuit at the fuse board (Mini circuit breaker should be 32 amps) so you’ll need a separate supply from your fuse board for the hob, and leave the existing cable to run the separate oven.

    I have a induction freestanding oven, it’s brilliant. I am not an electrician.
    • sarah1972
    • By sarah1972 13th Oct 19, 6:05 AM
    • 14,159 Posts
    • 43,731 Thanks
    sarah1972
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 19, 6:05 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 19, 6:05 AM
    I'm re-fitting my kitchen and need all new appliances, primarily a double oven and an induction hob. I know what I want in terms of an oven, but I am new to induction.


    I gather I need a hard-wired hob to get the most oomph in terms of using multiple zones. I think I'm going to need a good bridging function as I often use large pans and I'm used to the fast reaction of a gas hob. Are there any other functions I need to look out for?



    Every brand has similar advertising blurb, so I'd like some user's recommendations. please!
    Originally posted by ka7e
    One thing to take into account is that most if not all of your trusty pans won't be useable on an induction hob unless they are all relatively new.

    I was going to go for induction hob when I bought my new Neff slide and hide oven but I have too many well loved pans that I couldn't part with.
    I'm a Board Guide on all of the Shopping & Freebies Boards http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/forumdisplay.php?f=5
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    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 13th Oct 19, 11:36 AM
    • 13,774 Posts
    • 9,487 Thanks
    theonlywayisup
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 19, 11:36 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 19, 11:36 AM
    The new pan thing is a misnomer.

    It is nothing to do with your pans being old (or not relatively new). Any pan that attracts a magnet on the base will work. My stainless pans are years old as are my cast iron ones. Both work on induction beautifully.

    Take a magnet to your pans before you go off buying special pans for induction hobs.....
    • sarah1972
    • By sarah1972 13th Oct 19, 11:56 AM
    • 14,159 Posts
    • 43,731 Thanks
    sarah1972
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 19, 11:56 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 19, 11:56 AM
    The new pan thing is a misnomer.

    It is nothing to do with your pans being old (or not relatively new). Any pan that attracts a magnet on the base will work. My stainless pans are years old as are my cast iron ones. Both work on induction beautifully.

    Take a magnet to your pans before you go off buying special pans for induction hobs.....
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    Mine were all stainless steel and some are copper neither of which will work on induction so not a misnomer in my opinion.

    The problem stems from the fact that all stainless steel is not magnetic. In order for stainless steel cookware to be induction friendly it has to have 18/0 stainless steel or another magnetic material built into it. Manufacturers that want their cookware to be induction compatible typically add 18/0 stainless steel to their cookware to make it induction capable. The design of your stainless cookware really will not matter. It can be disc bottom or clad in design, as long as it has 18/0 stainless steel or another magnetic material it will work with induction cook tops.
    Last edited by sarah1972; 13-10-2019 at 11:59 AM.
    I'm a Board Guide on all of the Shopping & Freebies Boards http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/forumdisplay.php?f=5
    I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (its not part of my role to deal with reportable posts). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    • Misslayed
    • By Misslayed 13th Oct 19, 12:12 PM
    • 6,439 Posts
    • 29,153 Thanks
    Misslayed
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 19, 12:12 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 19, 12:12 PM
    I have a pan which originates from the first time orange pans were trendy - late 70s, early 80s, works a treat on my induction hob. Mine has a timer for each zone, which is very useful.
    Hi. Martin has asked me to tell you I'm a (novice) Board Guide on the Competitions, Site Feedback and Campaigns boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with abuse). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.
    • hareng
    • By hareng 13th Oct 19, 6:55 PM
    • 490 Posts
    • 167 Thanks
    hareng
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 19, 6:55 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 19, 6:55 PM
    Confirm our pans are stainless steel cheapies bought from TJ Hughes 2005 and can recall it stated on the box Induction ready.
    Having looked at them there is a heavy magnetic substance sandwiched between the stainless swaged on base and the stainless pans.


    I did have to replace the DeDietric induction about 5 years back i knelt on it Christmas Eve at 4pm, mad panic only could get a ceramic hob which are so slow.
    • ka7e
    • By ka7e 14th Oct 19, 11:43 PM
    • 2,506 Posts
    • 2,050 Thanks
    ka7e
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 19, 11:43 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 19, 11:43 PM
    My pans are induction-friendly - except for my pressure cooker! The kitchen is being totally rewired with a separate integrated double oven. I'm currently trying to cook on the 2 working rings of an ancient ceramic hob - it struggles to bring water to the boil even if you fill a pan from the kettle.
    "Cheap", "Fast", "Right" -- pick two.
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