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  • FIRST POST
    • Ames
    • By Ames 20th Nov 08, 3:42 PM
    • 17,728Posts
    • 31,354Thanks
    Ames
    Grrr - blue badge
    • #1
    • 20th Nov 08, 3:42 PM
    Grrr - blue badge 20th Nov 08 at 3:42 PM
    I went to morrisons this afternoon, and saw some people getting out of a car parked in a disabled bay without a badge. So I wound down my window and said 'excuse me but you've forgotten to put your badge out'. The woman said 'I'm with my 92 year old father, I've got to catch him up, that's why we're parking here'. Hmm, if he needs catching up to then surely his mobility isn't that bad? Besides, there were spaces as near, if not nearer, to the door that weren't marked that she could have parked in (I needed the disabled bay because of the extra room). Then I got into the store and she was pointing me out as if I were the wicked witch! And had a go as I was leaving, saying 'this is my father, it's clear we had a genuine reason for parking there'.

    I'd be quite interested to hear other people's views on this, whether age entitles you to park in a disabled bay? I have to say that I think if you don't have a badge you don't use it, I mean she wouldn't have got away with that excuse with a traffic warden in town, so why should a supermarket be any different?

    And was I right to challenge her in the first place? I mean, her dad was nowhere in sight and I'm not a mind reader...
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
Page 3
    • Unity
    • By Unity 21st Nov 08, 12:24 PM
    • 1,493 Posts
    • 3,180 Thanks
    Unity
    Politeness and common sense prevailed
    I have a blue badge - have had one since 1973 when I wrecked my spine in an accident, so as you can imagine I have had my share of funny looks over the years . I still get them now as I'm told I look young for my years .

    What really got me though was when I was at university, I went through the proper channels to get a named disabled parking space, close to the doors with a movable metal sign with my name on it. I manage most of the time on crutches because I find it difficult being in my wheelchair for long periods since I need to change position a lot.

    Any disabled student could apply for one of these named spaces, but the amount of times I arrived to find that my space had been taken was ridiculous. This included blue badge holders and those without - including lecturers who should damned well know better.

    Before anyone says I should have got there earlier, I always made a point of being at least half an hour early to park and get myself sorted before lectures . The trouble was that there weren't that many actual spaces - never mind disabled ones, so if I couldn't park near enough I had to basically go home which I was loathe to do.

    There was this one particular miscreant, albeit in a wheelchair who would determinedly nab my space, despite me pointing out politely that it had my name on it and - that he could easily get his own named space if he just applied. He just blanked me completely, speeding off into the distance in his racing wheelchair.

    Thankfully after unheeded verbal and written warnings by the university - they clamped him .

    There is an upside to this story though - another blue badge user who took my space came back to find a note I'd left on his windscreen politely asking him not to park there. He got in touch by e-mail to apologise and to find out how to get a named space. We became firm friends and worked out between us - and the university, times when our lectures didn't clash so either one of us could use the same space - thus saving spaces for other students.

    All it took was politeness and a bit of common sense (sadly lacking in the first student) - but there is so much rudeness, especially from these elderly vigilantes that it is no wonder they are met with equal measures of hostility in return.

    So in reply to the OP - I don't think age is an excuse, there are a lot of people older than me who are a heck of a lot fitter and I have to laugh when I see the ones carrying walking sticks (not using them) as if they are some sort of fashion accessory . Blue Badges are there for a reason, they are the only way that someone policing supermarket bays knows the person using the bay is disabled, these guys aren't psychic :rolleyes:. To those who are too lazy (or too much of a skinflint to fork out the £5 or whatever it is now) - or frankly know they aren't disabled enough to qualify the answer is clear - park elsewhere or pay the fine. The sooner these fines are enforceable the better.
    Last edited by Unity; 21-11-2008 at 12:26 PM.
    Some people hear voices, some see invisible people. Others have no imagination whatsoever
    • RAGSTORICHES
    • By RAGSTORICHES 21st Nov 08, 1:30 PM
    • 219 Posts
    • 131 Thanks
    RAGSTORICHES
    I think France has the right idea they have signs by their disabled bays that translate "Take my space take my disability too!" I think this would make most people who shouldn't use space think twice.
  • Valley's girl
    Let us look at this from a different perspective. Say this man was looking at the person in the car in front of you and glaring at them because they didnt have a badge. Surely you have to give him some credit because in effect he was looking after disableed peoples interest. This car owner (who doesnt have a badge) gets embarrased because they have been confronted, they move off and make a space for you who has got a badge, good for him I say, you should be thanking him.
    Originally posted by anniehanlon
    Why should some bloke invade my space and not wait until I got out of the car and then check if I had a badge.
    I was parked outside a shop in a parking bay so there would be no car spaces in front.
    So I can't see what I have to thank him for.:rolleyes:
    ally
    Last edited by Valley's girl; 21-11-2008 at 6:36 PM.
    Official DMP Mutual Support Club Member No 30
  • Valley's girl
    Our local ASDA has lots of disabled bays, more than any other supermarket, but there is never one free!
    Originally posted by Babshubbie
    Its like that in my local asdas unless you are there really early.
    Best wishes
    ally x
    Official DMP Mutual Support Club Member No 30
  • Babshubbie
    Its like that in my local asdas unless you are there really early.
    Best wishes
    ally x
    Originally posted by Valley's girl
    Perhaps there are a lot of people with broken legs there! (see post #38 above)

    Thanks for the X. I don't get many of those these days.
  • Valley's girl
    Perhaps there are a lot of people with broken legs there! (see post #38 above)

    Thanks for the X. I don't get many of those these days.
    Originally posted by Babshubbie
    Hi that made me laugh your very welcome for the kiss.
    Take care and have a good weekend.
    Ally x
    Official DMP Mutual Support Club Member No 30
  • Babshubbie
    Hi that made me laugh your very welcome for the kiss.
    Take care and have a good weekend.
    Ally x
    Originally posted by Valley's girl
    And you, too.

    • ceebeeby
    • By ceebeeby 21st Nov 08, 3:25 PM
    • 4,237 Posts
    • 10,773 Thanks
    ceebeeby
    I broke my leg earlier this year. I was approached by greeting staff in both ASDA and Tesco and actually invited to park in the disabled bays whilst on crutches. This was them telling me, not me asking them.

    I also take my elderly Nana shopping. We always park in the disabled bays. Don't even go there with the blue badge. She applied 5 months ago, and has yet to receive it (she's more than eligible)! Yes, we could have chased it up, I'm sure - but seriously what harm is it doing. If she had one, she would still be taking up the same space. And no, I'm not in the least bit concerned about fines, as the stores seem to employ people with common sense where this matter is concerned. If it's not bothering the store and it's not bothering me - why should it bother you?

    I would have thought that people who were going out shopping (able or disabled), had more concerning things to do than patrol the disabled / parent bays. TBH if someone said to me "you've forgotten to put out your blue badge", my best behaved response would be to scathingly ignore them. I certainly wouldn't go into a speech about my qualifications to park there.

    How would you ever know if someone was abusing the bays or not, without asking them to qualify, and if you want to go down that route, then expect the pointing out and loud comments once you're in the store. I read on this forum not that long ago that a huge % of blue badges were obtained fraudulently anyway, so even that doesn't seem to be a particularly safe way of stating eligibility.
  • Pssst
    Why don’t you get a blue badge for the days when need easy access? If you don’t have a blue badge and park in a disabled bay, you run the risk of being towed or ticketed.

    I think it goes without saying that ‘Blue Badge Holders Only’, mean legitimate ones! It’s down to the supermarket to police its disabled bays, not joe public.

    Let’s not forget that it’s an extreme minority that abuse the blue badge system.
    Originally posted by pazza
    I could be wrong but i seem to recall that to get a blue badge you need to be in receipt of some level of DLA or something? I'll recheck. Can you get DLA if your working and also would it be the case that working = no benefit/DLA= no blue badge ?

    Edit

    just found this
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DisabledPeople/MotoringAndTransport/Bluebadgescheme/DG_4001061


    It would appear that to apply you would have to fit the following (snipped from application form. So it looks,on the face of it,that youd have to be in a pretty bad way to get a badge. Strange that there are so many out there and so many people who dont seem to be in such dire straits.

    Are you in receipt of: 1. The higher rate of the Mobility component of the Disability Living Allowance? 2. War Pension’s Mobility Supplement? 3. A grant towards your vehicle? Or are you: 4. Registered Blind? Or do you: 5. Have a severe disability in both upper limbs and regularly drive an adapted motor vehicle but cannot turn the steering wheel of a motor vehicle by hand even if that wheel is fitted with a turning knob?
    PLEASE SUPPLY EVIDENCE If you have answered YES to any part of Part B, please supply the evidence, which must be a current letter of entitlement from the awarding body, or a copy of car insurance certificate Please see attached guidelines. Please read and sign Part E and return the form directly to the district office. If none
    Last edited by Pssst; 21-11-2008 at 6:03 PM.
  • tenacioust123
    I could be wrong but i seem to recall that to get a blue badge you need to be in receipt of some level of DLA or something? I'll recheck. Can you get DLA if your working and also would it be the case that working = no benefit/DLA= no blue badge ?

    Edit

    just found this
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DisabledPeople/MotoringAndTransport/Bluebadgescheme/DG_4001061


    It would appear that to apply you would have to fit the following (snipped from application form. So it looks,on the face of it,that youd have to be in a pretty bad way to get a badge. Strange that there are so many out there and so many people who dont seem to be in such dire straits.



    Are you in receipt of: 1. The higher rate of the Mobility component of the Disability Living Allowance? 2. War Pensionís Mobility Supplement? 3. A grant towards your vehicle? Or are you: 4. Registered Blind? Or do you: 5. Have a severe disability in both upper limbs and regularly drive an adapted motor vehicle but cannot turn the steering wheel of a motor vehicle by hand even if that wheel is fitted with a turning knob?
    PLEASE SUPPLY EVIDENCE If you have answered YES to any part of Part B, please supply the evidence, which must be a current letter of entitlement from the awarding body, or a copy of car insurance certificate Please see attached guidelines. Please read and sign Part E and return the form directly to the district office. If none
    Originally posted by Pssst
    It's up to your individual council to agree, you do not have to recieve DLA to be able to apply.

    When I 1st became ill I thought it was short term, I applied for a blue badge and it was agreed that I could have one.
  • pookienoodle
    I think France has the right idea they have signs by their disabled bays that translate "Take my space take my disability too!" I think this would make most people who shouldn't use space think twice.
    Originally posted by RAGSTORICHES
    I bought some very large stickers with this written on for my husband last year.
    we have only used 4 or 5,and only when we have seen a very fit person run from a disabled space to the cash machine.
    they are very large and sticky and take a long time to peel off a windscreen.
    • redmerlot
    • By redmerlot 22nd Nov 08, 8:52 AM
    • 66 Posts
    • 31 Thanks
    redmerlot
    I take my uncle shopping once a week, it is the only time he gets out of the house. He is 84 and has mobility problems and walks with two sticks. He fought in Burma and had his feet smashed. He also has his knee fixed so it cannot bend.

    I filled in the blue badge application form for him several months ago to which he received a phone call from them asking about his walking. Being the old fuddle gentleman he is he told them he was very well thank you and so was his walking!

    His claim was regected and i am now having to go through it all again with doctors letters etc.

    Meanwhile l park in disabled bays with him but l must admit no one has ever challanged us.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Learn from the mistakes of others - you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.
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    • jackieb
    • By jackieb 22nd Nov 08, 9:05 AM
    • 26,981 Posts
    • 78,788 Thanks
    jackieb
    My mum has a blue badge. One day my dad took her into town and parked on a single yellow line while she went into the chemist. A traffic warden came up to my dad and my dad told him that he was waiting for my mum and it was her who the blue badge was for. The warden then told him that he wasn't allowed to stay in the car while the badge holder was not in the car.

    Surely, it's the other way round? We always thought that the badge holder wasn't allowed to wait in the car while the able-bodied person ran their errands? That's why when I take my mum out and we park in a disabled spot she always comes into the shops, rather than us just run in for her - as we always thought this wasn't allowed?
  • tenacioust123
    Hi jackieb

    I think you met an over-zealous traffic warden ( but I may be corrected). I would have thought both situations would have been ok as long as the blue badge was on display.
  • jodie114
    ohh sorry, i just had to put my two pennys in, this is a subject that is a topic of HUGE conversation in my family. I have had a blue badge since i was 20, now being 28, and get soooo many dirty looks, especially since i have a 5 year old child - apparently disabled people can't have children??:confused:

    I walk with a limp, which is sometimes visable, it depends how much pain i am in, but with heart problems as well, need it for exertion purposes as well.

    I must say the elderly really get my goat ( and i worked in a nursing home for 5 years before my accident), a lot seem to assume that when you get to 65 you are automatically entitled. i had to fight tooth and nail to get my badge - so why can't they????

    Lol - i guess it doesn't help that my dad is also disabled and so is my grandad (both with badges)!!
    • Unity
    • By Unity 22nd Nov 08, 1:13 PM
    • 1,493 Posts
    • 3,180 Thanks
    Unity
    My mum has a blue badge. One day my dad took her into town and parked on a single yellow line while she went into the chemist. A traffic warden came up to my dad and my dad told him that he was waiting for my mum and it was her who the blue badge was for. The warden then told him that he wasn't allowed to stay in the car while the badge holder was not in the car.

    Surely, it's the other way round? We always thought that the badge holder wasn't allowed to wait in the car while the able-bodied person ran their errands? That's why when I take my mum out and we park in a disabled spot she always comes into the shops, rather than us just run in for her - as we always thought this wasn't allowed?
    Originally posted by jackieb
    Typical isn't it? I'll check with my friend who used to be a TW - but I am sure this is incorrect. If your mother had been the driver (still disabled) and had left your father sitting in the car, there is no way the traffic warden could tell him he couldn't sit there - it isn't up to him to dictate who sits in their own car, he's just a jobsworth! I'd love to know how he would have explained it on the ticket.

    I am sure you are correct in saying that the opposite is true - a non-disabled person cannot park using the badge even if it is to collect something on behalf of the disabled person sitting in the car.
    Some people hear voices, some see invisible people. Others have no imagination whatsoever
    • nanokitten
    • By nanokitten 22nd Nov 08, 2:12 PM
    • 703 Posts
    • 464 Thanks
    nanokitten
    I am sure you are correct in saying that the opposite is true - a non-disabled person cannot park using the badge even if it is to collect something on behalf of the disabled person sitting in the car.
    Originally posted by Unity
    I'm not so sure about this, although it would make sense. I read on a disabled web site that this is actually legal too, anyone find a definative answer?
    • Ames
    • By Ames 22nd Nov 08, 3:27 PM
    • 17,728 Posts
    • 31,354 Thanks
    Ames
    I think in the booklet you get with a blue badge it says the disabled person can't sit in the car and wait while an ab passenger goes and does something. I don't still have my leaflet though.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • Rebel
    • By Rebel 22nd Nov 08, 3:58 PM
    • 180 Posts
    • 135 Thanks
    Rebel
    I have to say the people that say parking fines issued by supermarkets may be mistaken.

    If that were the case wheel clampers would not be able to operate at all, a supermarket/shop car park is private property and whoever owns that property can decide to do whatever they wish within reason on that property, INCLUDING employ wheel clampers to enforce disabled bay restrictions.
  • Pssst
    I have to say the people that say parking fines issued by supermarkets may be mistaken.

    If that were the case wheel clampers would not be able to operate at all, a supermarket/shop car park is private property and whoever owns that property can decide to do whatever they wish within reason on that property, INCLUDING employ wheel clampers to enforce disabled bay restrictions.
    Originally posted by Rebel

    Indeed they can but it would then be a civil matter rather than a legal matter. For instance,if a private clamper clamped my motor and i chose to cut his clamp off and leave it nearby,he couldnt really involve the police and would have to pursue a civil claim in the courts. Same with Asda etc. It isnt on the public highway so its a civil dispute.
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