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    • mazibee
    • By mazibee 25th May 19, 1:41 PM
    • 173Posts
    • 14Thanks
    mazibee
    Building Survey Report - Areas of concern
    • #1
    • 25th May 19, 1:41 PM
    Building Survey Report - Areas of concern 25th May 19 at 1:41 PM
    Building Survey Report / Issues

    We have received or building survey report and has some serious issues, Its a 42 page report and I am only including some parts which show areas of concern

    (a). Electricity

    http://prntscr.com/nt6xz2

    Hallway, Two Reception Rooms and a Kitchen
    CONDITION SUMMARY: The property is connected to mains electricity. The electricity meter and consumer units are in the cupboard under the stairs. The consumer units do not have residual current device protection and this is a safety hazard and will not meet current regulations.
    There is no evidence of mains connected smoke and heat detectors in the property and this is a safety hazard as it increases the risk of being trapped in the event of a fire.
    It is not possible to fully assess the condition of electrical installation on the basis of a visual inspection only. There are many factors relating to the adequacy of electrical installations which can only be identified by a test which covers matters relating to resistance, impedance, and current, etc. It is therefore essential that the purchasing legal adviser checks to see whether recent test certificates are in place. The IET wiring regulations state that installations should be tested every 10 years or a change of ownership/tenancy. Without such proof, we are unable to comment
    fully on the installationís serviceability and therefore, an Electrical Installation Condition Report should, therefore, be obtained, prior to purchase, from a qualified electrical contractor and all recommendations implemented.
    CONDITION RATING: Defects that are serious and/or need to be repaired, replaced or investigated urgently.
    ASSUMED REPAIR COST: £1000
    1st Floor: Three Bedrooms and a Bathroom Similar type and condition as described above.

    GAS Meter

    http://prntscr.com/nt6yan
    CONDITION SUMMARY: The property is connected to mains gas. The gas meter is in a cupboard under the stairs.
    You should ask your legal adviser to check with the gas supplier for evidence the gas meter is properly located, properly installed and safe. If evidence is not available, you should ask an appropriately qualified person to inspect the gas meter and supply and provide you with a report.
    CONDITION RATING: Serious or urgent and should be repaired as soon as possible.
    ASSUMED REPAIR COST: £500
    CLARIFICATION NOTE: This estimate includes the safety checks to the central heating system, gas appliances and gas meter installation by a Gas Safe registered contractor.

    Sub floor ventilation

    http://prntscr.com/nt6ykm

    EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS
    SUB-VENTILATION DESCRIPTION: There is adequate provision of air bricks to the rear and side elevation walls.
    CONDITION SUMMARY: Alterations have been made to the property without the appropriate provision of cross ventilation to properly ventilate the subfloor voids within the property.
    The grounds alongside the front elevation wall are high and appear to be either covering the existing air bricks or none is present. Alterations will, therefore, be necessary to add/uncovered air bricks to the front wall to comply with Local Authority Building Regulations. Restricted ventilation can result in noxious gases and/or condensation that can cause dry rot to affect the floor timbers and other components of the building. We would be unable to confirm the full effect of this issue without a subfloor inspection within the building and further investigation is required.
    Therefore, we recommend that the timber floors are inspected by a PCA registered timber treatment specialist. This will require removal of floor coverings and floorboards from the ground floor rooms to allow thorough inspection.
    CONDITION RATING: Defects that are serious and/or need to be repaired, replaced or investigated urgently.
    ASSUMED REPAIR COST: £1500


    Floors
    Hallway, Two Reception Rooms and a Kitchen
    FLOOR DESCRIPTION: The floors throughout are a combination of solid and suspended timber construction and covered with fitted carpet or vinyl flooring.
    CONDITION SUMMARY: The floorboards are creaky and this can be resolved by fixing them securely to the floor joists. This work will require the removal of the floor coverings and any damaged timber replaced. Although the subfloor ventilation is in line with the standards set at the time of construction, it is limited in comparison with modern building methods. It is important to have good subfloor ventilation for suspended timber floors to help prevent the onset of rot and woodworm infestation. Due to the lack of adequate subfloor ventilation, as, it is likely that the ground floor timber floors are affected by rot and/or woodworm. We, therefore, recommend that the subfloor ventilation is improved to modern standards by an experienced building contractor. The timber floors should also be inspected by a PCA registered timber treatment
    specialist to see whether or not there is any rot or woodworm that requires treating.
    CONDITION RATING: Defects that are serious and/or need to be repaired, replaced or investigated urgently.
    ASSUMED REPAIR COST: £0

    1st Floor: Three Bedrooms and a Bathroom
    FLOOR DESCRIPTION: The floor is of suspended timber construction.
    CONDITION SUMMARY: This part of the property is in a similar condition as in the ground floor, with creaky floorboards.
    CONDITION RATING: Defects that need repairing or replacing but are not considered to be either serious or urgent. The property must be maintained in the normal way.

    Balustrade to the staircase
    http://prntscr.com/nt70q9

    CONDITION SUMMARY: There is no balustrade to the staircase and this is considered to be a Health and Safety risk. An appropriately qualified joinery contractor should be able to implement alteration works to comply with Local Authority Building Regulations.
    CONDITION RATING: Serious or urgent and should be repaired as soon as possible.
    ASSUMED REPAIR COST: £500

    Dampness and timber defects
    Hallway, Two Reception Rooms and a Kitchen
    DAMPNESS DESCRIPTION: All accessible parts were tested with an electronic moisture meter and we found no evidence of dampness internally.
    CONDITION SUMMARY: The timber floor structure will require to be inspected to confirm whether the lack of adequate subfloor ventilation has caused any damage.
    CONDITION RATING: Defects that are serious and/or need to be repaired, replaced or investigated urgently.
    ASSUMED REPAIR COST: £0

    Please can someone comment on this report especially the electrics and gas section

    Thanks in advance.
Page 3
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 27th May 19, 6:11 PM
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    Davesnave
    He also said that might be propery has concrete so no need of air bricks for the floor ventilation...
    Originally posted by mazibee
    But you know the floors aren't all concrete, because your surveyor said:
    "The floorboards are creaky and this can be resolved by fixing them securely to the floor joists. This work will require the removal of the floor coverings and any damaged timber replaced. Although the subfloor ventilation is in line with the standards set at the time of construction, it is limited in comparison with modern building methods."

    So the suspended floors are ventilated to some degree, but not as much as deemed good practice today. Given that the house is decades old, why might this inferior ventilation suddenly give trouble? (I'm not saying that it is.) I can only think of something like raising the ground level outside, which may have happened when the block paving shown in this picture was done:
    http://prntscr.com/nt6ykm

    The brick surface has been laid sloping towards the house,and water is directed into an Acco drain.This wasn't a great choice, but it probably saved someone digging out a lot of material. I would want your existing surveyor's comment on that for a start! There ought to be a much greater gap beneath the door threshold and the ground.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 27-05-2019 at 6:14 PM.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • mazibee
    • By mazibee 27th May 19, 6:42 PM
    • 173 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    mazibee
    But you know the floors aren't all concrete, because your surveyor said:
    "The floorboards are creaky and this can be resolved by fixing them securely to the floor joists. This work will require the removal of the floor coverings and any damaged timber replaced. Although the subfloor ventilation is in line with the standards set at the time of construction, it is limited in comparison with modern building methods."

    So the suspended floors are ventilated to some degree, but not as much as deemed good practice today. Given that the house is decades old, why might this inferior ventilation suddenly give trouble? (I'm not saying that it is.) I can only think of something like raising the ground level outside, which may have happened when the block paving shown in this picture was done:
    http://prntscr.com/nt6ykm

    The brick surface has been laid sloping towards the house,and water is directed into an Acco drain.This wasn't a great choice, but it probably saved someone digging out a lot of material. I would want your existing surveyor's comment on that for a start! There ought to be a much greater gap beneath the door threshold and the ground.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Thanks for the reply
    The houses on this road have a huge slope from the road outside. (The houses and there driveways are lower as compared to the roads outside)



    Today I passed by the property and saw that next door houses have built the drive way and have done the gradual slop but all of them have the slope towards the house as the road is higher, that look strange as normally it should be the opposite seem that its not possible to raise the whole house above the road and then slope the driveway towards the road.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 27th May 19, 7:45 PM
    • 28,440 Posts
    • 100,175 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Thanks for the reply
    The houses on this road have a huge slope from the road outside. (The houses and there driveways are lower as compared to the roads outside).
    Originally posted by mazibee
    Yes, I understand. My last house was below road level too, but on the narrow section along the front of the building, I excavated to make it slope the other way into a drainage channel.
    With the house in the picture, the Acco drain ought to be at the base of the garden retaining wall. Perhaps it couldn't be easily placed there due to the wall foundations, or just because more digging and work would have been needed, but sloping the pathway towards the house isn't best practice especially when it still ends so high up the wall.

    Just ask yourself what happens when there's extreme weather and there's suddenly water rushing down the drive.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • mazibee
    • By mazibee 2nd Jun 19, 1:52 PM
    • 173 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    mazibee
    Please can someone guide me as running short of time. Our solicitosr have raised the enquiries so want to make a decision before its too late.

    Shall I go for the Damp and timber survey as pointed out by the surveyor in the building survey report.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 2nd Jun 19, 4:54 PM
    • 9,589 Posts
    • 11,581 Thanks
    Owain Moneysaver
    Please can someone guide me as running short of time. Our solicitosr have raised the enquiries so want to make a decision before its too late.

    Shall I go for the Damp and timber survey as pointed out by the surveyor in the building survey report.
    Originally posted by mazibee
    It's your money, but I wouldn't. Especially if the "survey" is carried out by a chemical salesman.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 2nd Jun 19, 6:14 PM
    • 28,440 Posts
    • 100,175 Thanks
    Davesnave
    It's your money, but I wouldn't. .
    Originally posted by Owain Moneysaver
    Neither would I, because the vendor isn't going to allow lifting of floorboards or any proper viewing of what lies beneath the suspended floors.


    I haven't any detailed knowledge of the house, so I don't know what else I might do. As I've said before, if the price was in my favour, I'd probably buy, knowing there would be problems hidden somewhere, because no older house is going to be perfect.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • mazibee
    • By mazibee 3rd Jun 19, 7:17 AM
    • 173 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    mazibee
    It's your money, but I wouldn't. Especially if the "survey" is carried out by a chemical salesman.
    Originally posted by Owain Moneysaver
    I plan to use the services of

    http://www.clifffullerassociates.co.uk/

    but as said by Davenave, now I am in a perplex situation, what if I don't go for survey now, and later once house purchased something serious comes up.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 3rd Jun 19, 7:29 AM
    • 28,440 Posts
    • 100,175 Thanks
    Davesnave
    I plan to use the services of

    http://www.clifffullerassociates.co.uk/

    but as said by Davenave, now I am in a perplex situation, what if I don't go for survey now, and later once house purchased something serious comes up.
    Originally posted by mazibee
    I didn't say you were in a perplexing situation; you've decided that! Actually, you're in the same position as most people

    I said that almost all older houses will have hidden problems somewhere and not all of them will be found by the sort of non-invasive surveys vendors allow.

    For example, the house I sold last had the wrong bricks below the damp course and they were starting to crumble. My present house had a drain issue that only became apparent in winter time. Neither of these things was visible when inspected.

    If you don't want structural issues of some kind to occur sometime, buy a insurance-backed, guaranteed new house from a reputable local builder. Even then, you will find small issues.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 03-06-2019 at 7:32 AM.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
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