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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Rebecca
    • By Former MSE Rebecca 11th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    • 113Posts
    • 96Thanks
    Former MSE Rebecca
    It's aitch not haitch
    • #1
    • 11th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    It's aitch not haitch 11th Nov 14 at 11:48 AM
    Does it drive you up the wall when people 'literally' die laughing? Or how about those who give 110%?



    Check out Martin's top 10 list for word pedants

    Hit "reply" to add yours!

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    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 06-10-2017 at 1:02 PM.
Page 49
    • Morbier
    • By Morbier 15th Oct 19, 5:26 PM
    • 290 Posts
    • 400 Thanks
    Morbier
    And if you buy shoes at a shoe shop and clothes in a clothes shop, what would you expect to find in a farm shop?
    I can't imagine a life without cheese. (Nigel Slater)
    • Sleazy
    • By Sleazy 15th Oct 19, 5:28 PM
    • 18,798 Posts
    • 40,300 Thanks
    Sleazy
    And if you buy shoes at a shoe shop and clothes in a clothes shop, what would you expect to find in a farm shop?
    Originally posted by Morbier
    Farms perhaps?
    Weekly Distance Walked 27km / Total For Year 1271 km

    Quod scripsi, scripsi
    • Morbier
    • By Morbier 15th Oct 19, 5:35 PM
    • 290 Posts
    • 400 Thanks
    Morbier
    Farms perhaps?
    Originally posted by Sleazy
    Oh damn, you guessed
    I can't imagine a life without cheese. (Nigel Slater)
    • z1a
    • By z1a 15th Oct 19, 6:14 PM
    • 2,379 Posts
    • 2,441 Thanks
    z1a
    I suppose you expect a car park to have only room for one car, a pig farm to have a single animal, and a shoe shop just to sell the one shoe?
    Originally posted by FormulaDriven
    Or one hair cut!
    • purpoise
    • By purpoise 18th Oct 19, 6:21 PM
    • 102 Posts
    • 148 Thanks
    purpoise
    What happened to the word "need?"
    It used to mean something essential, like breathing, eating, drinking, or something that one was wanting: "You need feet to walk with", "you need a rubber for that mistake."
    Now we're hyping the Yanks and using it instead of "should, ought to, etc."
    The mother of the biker who was killed by a US diplomat's wife today said that the driver needs to come back to the UK and face charges.
    I think that's the last thing she needs, that's why she's staying in the USA.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 19th Oct 19, 9:55 AM
    • 26,963 Posts
    • 70,972 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I'd say that 'need' has always had the secondary meaning of to be obliged to do something.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 21st Oct 19, 9:53 AM
    • 3,072 Posts
    • 15,695 Thanks
    NBLondon
    Should there be a second clause in that use of need - you need to do X to ensure Y or avoid X - even though you don't actually need X in and of itself?
    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 21st Oct 19, 10:50 AM
    • 26,963 Posts
    • 70,972 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Should there be a second clause in that use of need - you need to do X to ensure Y or avoid X - even though you don't actually need X in and of itself?
    Originally posted by NBLondon


    Not sure about that.

    While I was typing my post above, I was thinking that I needed a wee. I suppose the following clause would be 'before I have an accident.' .
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 22nd Oct 19, 9:42 AM
    • 3,072 Posts
    • 15,695 Thanks
    NBLondon
    I was thinking that I needed a wee.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    I'd say that one is "need" as in an essential biological function rather than an obligation. OK, there's a social obligation to not wet yourself in public. (if you are over three or so)

    It does get used in the sense of obligation or of recommendation - "Nah - what you need to do there is..." when there isn't actual necessity. Again I think there's an unspoken second clause of "because that's the best way"
    Last edited by NBLondon; 22-10-2019 at 9:42 AM. Reason: Fix Quotes
    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    • Sapphire
    • By Sapphire 30th Oct 19, 12:24 PM
    • 3,126 Posts
    • 7,164 Thanks
    Sapphire
    Naughtius Maximus, I'm with you on that one. However, what about the date at the bottom - shouldn't there be a 'th' after the 6. Bit too 'American' for me without it.

    But I may be wrong; I'm never sure of the correct way to write a date, despite being told during shorthand lessons many, many years ago.
    Originally posted by Morbier
    No – in all (English) books I work on now, the style is 6 May, not 6th May, though the latter is not incorrect, of course. The Americans reverse the day and month, as someone has already pointed out.

    When it comes to times, most publishers use 6 a.m. not 6 am or 6am.

    We (the Oxford English Dictionary, for example) also now use 'z' spellings, as in 'recognize' rather than 'recognise'.

    Cafe is spelt without an accent, and 'et al' is no longer italicised, etc.

    We now use single quotation marks rather than double, except within quotations that are in single quotation marks, in which case they are double.

    In many cases, an 'old-fashioned' or 'newer' version of a spelling or punctuation can be used, and neither is actually incorrect, though in a publication the use of one or the other must be consistent.

    Also, Americans 'look out the window', while Brits 'look out of the window' (come across that a lot). Then they use 'gray' rather than 'grey', and miss out the 'u' in many words, e.g. 'color' rather than 'colour', and have different word endings when it comes to 're' words (the metric measurement 'metre' is their 'meter', 'fibre' is 'fiber', and so on).

    Things like 'he was sat on a bench' I think are British inventions.

    The inappropriate use of the word 'so' at the beginning of a statement, currently even favoured by broadcasters who have a supposedly good education , may be the same.

    Apologies if some of this has already been covered in earlier posts, but don't have time to read through them all.
    Last edited by Sapphire; 30-10-2019 at 12:58 PM.
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