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  • FIRST POST
    • Emmasophie
    • By Emmasophie 14th Jan 20, 2:04 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Emmasophie
    How can an agoraphobic verify a bank account
    • #1
    • 14th Jan 20, 2:04 PM
    How can an agoraphobic verify a bank account 14th Jan 20 at 2:04 PM
    Hi,
    My teenage daughter registered online to open a 'Help to buy' ISA just before the deadline, on my advice, with one of the big building societies (tempted to name them but won't! yet!). She has received an email to say that she needs to bring some extra ID into branch to confirm her identity before they will open the account.
    She is agoraphobic, so asked me what to do, and I told her to email them back and explain, to get some advice from them. The email address is a 'no reply' email so I said that I would call into our local branch for advice instead.
    I called in today and the lady, rang head office for advice, I was told that if she won't come in then there is nothing she can do, the account will expire if not verified. I also said that we'd stopped renewing her passport when she stopped going out, and also she has no need for a driving licence, so what ID would have been acceptable. She would have been a new customer to this building society.
    The person I spoke to said "what does she normally do?" - she doesn't normally do anything, I have to get whatever she needs and she's never tried to open an account like this - I just thought that she should get one of these. Hopefully in years to come she may get better and need a house of her own.
    This is quite annoying, as it's now too late to look elsewhere for this type of account, as the deadline passed. It feels discriminatory towards a mental illness, although I do appreciate money laundering and fraud have to be checked. They are quite welcome to visit her at home, SKYPE, face time whatever, it just doesn't seem fair to say her problems will prevent her from opening an account. We are reasonably new to the limitations of agoraphobia, how do other people get on?
Page 1
    • Brodiebobs
    • By Brodiebobs 14th Jan 20, 2:20 PM
    • 904 Posts
    • 3,512 Thanks
    Brodiebobs
    • #2
    • 14th Jan 20, 2:20 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Jan 20, 2:20 PM
    I believe (but could be wrong its a while since i worked in a bank) ID is only needed when they cannot verify identity any other way.

    From what i can see from your OP they haven't asked for Photo ID and they usually include a list of what is acceptable on the original request so may accept a birth certificate, bill in her name-perhaps mobile? or if she is a benefit claimant a letter from HMRC.

    I'm not sure there is actually a requirement for her to go into the branch, i'm sure you could take the documents in for her.

    If not it might be prudent to get a POA so you can deal with financial affairs on her behalf until she is well enough.

    Understand your frustration as i opened a savings account for my at the time 7 year old, was told i needed photo ID and a proof of address, the girl behind the counter wouldn't accept a child benefit letter, and was adamant i should produce a bill, statement or wage slip in the child's name
    Last edited by Brodiebobs; 14-01-2020 at 2:22 PM.
    • born again
    • By born again 14th Jan 20, 3:34 PM
    • 1,454 Posts
    • 803 Thanks
    born again
    • #3
    • 14th Jan 20, 3:34 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Jan 20, 3:34 PM
    I think you maybe better off forgetting the above and look at a Lifetime ISA. At least that way if she does not get better (hope she does) it goes towards retirement.

    https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/savings/lifetime-isas

    Given that there is Government involvement in these in terms of the bonus. It could be that there are much tighter rules on proof of ID.
    So you might need to speak to any provider before applying and explaining the situation.

    POA is a great idea.
    • Emmasophie
    • By Emmasophie 14th Jan 20, 3:39 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Emmasophie
    • #4
    • 14th Jan 20, 3:39 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Jan 20, 3:39 PM
    Thanks. I also hadn't thought about POA.

    When she was under 16 it was OK for me to do things for her as a parent, but now she's kind of in an adult bracket it's more difficult, so I will look at that thanks.
    • Willing2Learn
    • By Willing2Learn 14th Jan 20, 4:45 PM
    • 5,200 Posts
    • 4,840 Thanks
    Willing2Learn
    • #5
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:45 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:45 PM
    Since 1 October 1999, businesses have had to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ for disabled people, such as providing extra help or making changes to the way in which services are provided. From 1 October 2004, they will have to make further ‘reasonable adjustments’ to any physical features of their premises that make it difficult for disabled people to use their services.

    So a firm cannot, on the grounds of a person’s disability, refuse to provide that person with a service that it offers to other people. And it has a legal duty to make reasonable adjustments to ensure its services are accessible to disabled people.
    Source: Ombudsman News, issue 37, page 4
    Last edited by Willing2Learn; 14-01-2020 at 4:47 PM.
    I work within the voluntary sector, supporting vulnerable people to rebuild their lives.

    I love my job

    • Jonathan Kelvin
    • By Jonathan Kelvin 14th Jan 20, 4:50 PM
    • 254 Posts
    • 559 Thanks
    Jonathan Kelvin
    • #6
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:50 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:50 PM
    If she’s not able to leave home at all then why the ISA?
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 14th Jan 20, 4:54 PM
    • 35,668 Posts
    • 22,511 Thanks
    DCFC79
    • #7
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:54 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:54 PM
    If she’s not able to leave home at all then why the ISA?
    Originally posted by Jonathan Kelvin

    I wonder how the daughter would have an income to get a mortgage for a property.
    • Willing2Learn
    • By Willing2Learn 14th Jan 20, 4:57 PM
    • 5,200 Posts
    • 4,840 Thanks
    Willing2Learn
    • #8
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:57 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Jan 20, 4:57 PM
    If she’s not able to leave home at all then why the ISA?
    Originally posted by Jonathan Kelvin
    Although the OPs daughter may be having severe symptoms, the condition is treatable via CBT, medication and making certain lifestyle changes. Regardless of that, the 'Help to Buy' ISA might be the perfect saving product for the OPs daughter.
    I work within the voluntary sector, supporting vulnerable people to rebuild their lives.

    I love my job

    • Emmasophie
    • By Emmasophie 14th Jan 20, 5:53 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Emmasophie
    • #9
    • 14th Jan 20, 5:53 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Jan 20, 5:53 PM
    Thank you, I haven’t given up hope of a better future, and believe we should still make positive plans. Not nice comments to read from the two earlier posts, Thankfully I have had some good advice as a result of this post, but I can see forums are not the place for me going forward. Thank you to those who have been very helpful. The Willing2learn post did summarise our position perfectly.
    • abz88
    • By abz88 14th Jan 20, 6:01 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 119 Thanks
    abz88
    If she’s not able to leave home at all then why the ISA?
    Originally posted by Jonathan Kelvin
    OP had already stated in their initial post it is in the hope that they get better and eventually look for a house for themselves. It is a treatable mental illness, so absolutely no harm in OP planning for the future.

    And their question was how they could verify the account, not "should I have opened an help to buy ISA".
    • Brodiebobs
    • By Brodiebobs 15th Jan 20, 9:51 AM
    • 904 Posts
    • 3,512 Thanks
    Brodiebobs
    Thank you, I haven’t given up hope of a better future, and believe we should still make positive plans. Not nice comments to read from the two earlier posts, Thankfully I have had some good advice as a result of this post, but I can see forums are not the place for me going forward. Thank you to those who have been very helpful. The Willing2learn post did summarise our position perfectly.
    Originally posted by Emmasophie
    Dont let the negative comments stop you using the forums. On the whole they are supportive and informative places.

    Hope you get sorted and hope your daughter has a speedy recovery
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