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    • Icey77
    • By Icey77 13th Dec 12, 12:44 PM
    • 1,221 Posts
    • 4,421 Thanks
    Icey77
    Following my Dads death 6 years ago my Mum has set up a savings account which my sister and I are additional signatories to. The account requires 2 out of the 3 signatures to withdraw cash.

    This is so that there is money readily available to pay for her funeral when the time comes.

    I think my grandmother has taken an similar step too.
    Whether you think you can or you canít, youíre probably right ~ Henry Ford

    Got Married ~ 19th March 2011

    DD Born 16th March 2012 DS Born 3rd May 2014
    • fpcat
    • By fpcat 20th Feb 13, 7:12 PM
    • 310 Posts
    • 1,048 Thanks
    fpcat
    About 12 months ago I was quite bothered about wills, funerals and such. I made a will in December 2011, and I borrowed a book called

    LAST ORDERS
    : The Essential Guide to your Letter of Wishes by P Byron

    This is a kind of guidebook/workbook which walks you through the things you feel you need to think about before your death. It covers things like essential papers, children, funeral arrangements, pets and who needs informing, etc. I bought a copy (about £12.95 Amazon), and have filled most of it in. I've told my next of kin of it, and they know where it will be stored. Along with my funeral plan it should save them a lot of time and anxiety when I pass, and they are left to deal with things. The only thing is I've said what music etc I want at my funeral, but haven't yet got round to telling my chosen Funeral Director, so that is next on my list of things to complete.


    • PennyForThem
    • By PennyForThem 21st Feb 13, 7:53 AM
    • 601 Posts
    • 539 Thanks
    PennyForThem
    Following my Dads death 6 years ago my Mum has set up a savings account which my sister and I are additional signatories to. The account requires 2 out of the 3 signatures to withdraw cash.

    This is so that there is money readily available to pay for her funeral when the time comes.

    I think my grandmother has taken an similar step too.
    Originally posted by Icey77

    I would double check that if I were you. I set up a similiar arrangement (I thought) with my son but the bank actually would allow withdrawals on one signature - I found out later.
    • worriedmum46
    • By worriedmum46 22nd May 13, 10:29 PM
    • 333 Posts
    • 4,431 Thanks
    worriedmum46
    Will
    Hi, was wondering if any second 'wife' or husbands out there have written a will, and what issues it bought up.

    I am a second wife, my husband has grown up children/grandchildren from a first marriage, and we have school aged children together.

    We live in a house I bought before we married and I would like it to go to my children on the basis that they are set up well -

    My health is a disaster and I am probably looking at months of life and not years. Hubby is fab, but a financial disaster - and I want the kids to be safe/roof over heads and am thinking of leaving it to them in the will.

    Is this sensible do you think?
    January 2012 Debenhams Goodie Bag and Conor Maynard Tickets (= happy teenage daughter!).

    Thanks to all who post, and GL to all who try!!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 23rd May 13, 12:18 AM
    • 37,238 Posts
    • 22,972 Thanks
    getmore4less
    How old are the kids

    who lives in the house.

    do you want hubby to be able to stay living there.

    You need to get advice from a solicitor
    • vanda
    • By vanda 7th Jun 13, 9:18 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    vanda
    put £1000 under the bed
    lost mum recently - scotland - basic funeral around £3000. Brothers (not worldy wise but all other members family not in country) Anyway funeral parlour wanted £800 deposit (TO BE PAID IN 3 DAYS B4 funeral) - Money there but in policies etc. Phoned Funeral Robbers to say that money WILL be paid but insurance policy cant be cashed for a couple more days. Response NO MONEY NO FUNERAL
    • John_Pierpoint
    • By John_Pierpoint 8th Jun 13, 4:30 AM
    • 8,248 Posts
    • 7,388 Thanks
    John_Pierpoint
    Yes, getting 6 death certificates was a wise move as well as obtaining about 4 probate certificates - made things easier.

    Businesses you send death cert and probate cert to do return them.

    Always ask for the death department when calling a company - most do have dedicated advisors when calling about a departed. This is really useful as they treat you sensitively and actually help you do what needs to be done. You can contact them at any time with anything to do with the death - even months after. Get a name though would be my advice.
    Originally posted by PennyForThem
    Some share registrars refuse to give the certificates back.

    I found "the bereavement dept." the commonly used euphemism for dealing with dead account holders.
  • jilljax
    planning for your funeral
    I must agree with Martin on how important this is. My beloved Dad died 2 years ago and he had planned his funeral from the hymns he wanted, who he wanted to take the service, how he wanted the layout of the hymnsheet, the announcement in the paper. He had even bought a grave for himself and my Mum!
    he would remind us where all these instructions were on a regular basis, and we would say things like "Oh Dad, don't talk about that".
    But when the time came, he saved us a lot of worry and angst and in fact, we sometimes had a little laugh just remembering how he organised it all.

    I shall try and do the same but it will be difficult!
    • ronmiel
    • By ronmiel 21st Aug 13, 8:31 PM
    • 152 Posts
    • 186 Thanks
    ronmiel
    One thing I would remind everybody is to keep a note of each others National Insurance number. When my husband died, every form I needed to fill in seemed to need this number. Where you will obviously know the deceased persons name and birth date, very few people know somebody elses N.I. number. I have made sure my sons know where to find mine.
  • Leslie999
    [QUOTE=Bad-dad;56626125]My wife died earlier this year and I was most surprised when her bank transferred the balances of her current & savings accounts to me within days after sight of only the death certificate. In the past nothing would have occurred until Grant of Probate had been issued. I may have been fortunate but had it been me who died and my bank had blocked my accounts until probate then my wife could have been hard pressed to meet all the day to day bills let alone those of my funeral!
    Some time ago we decided to avoid any such problem by changing all of our individual savings accounts into joint accounts. This way title would immediately, upon production of death certificate, be switched to the sole survivor.


    Legally , this does not apply in Scotland. The deceased's half of a joint account belongs to the deceased's estate, not the surviving joint account holder.

    If anyone knows whether accounts are released nowadays without probate please advise otherwise what we did may be worth while giving some consideration.

    Yes , banks do release monies without probate/ confirmation (yet they shouldn't according to law if there is more than a certain amount..) which is how my stepfather was able to clear all my mums accounts ( in her name only & well over £5,000) the day before her funeral, and keep it for himself against her wishes.
    The banks have denied doing this yet I have copies of the receipts thanks to an expensive court procedure.
    However, as my lawyer tells me, it's not a crime to tell lies. It only becomes a crime if you are under oath and your lies can be shown to be lies with written evidence.
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 28th Aug 13, 3:02 PM
    • 10,671 Posts
    • 57,519 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    The account requires 2 out of the 3 signatures to withdraw cash.
    Originally posted by Icey77
    Heaven forbid, but what happens, if more than one of the signatories dies at the same time?
    1984 WAS NOT AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - £1308

    You can't be a Christian AND a Socialist.
  • toontron
    I must agree with Martin on how important this is. My beloved Dad died 2 years ago and he had planned his funeral from the hymns he wanted, who he wanted to take the service, how he wanted the layout of the hymnsheet, the announcement in the paper. He had even bought a grave for himself and my Mum!
    he would remind us where all these instructions were on a regular basis, and we would say things like "Oh Dad, don't talk about that".
    But when the time came, he saved us a lot of worry and angst and in fact, we sometimes had a little laugh just remembering how he organised it all.

    I shall try and do the same but it will be difficult!
    Originally posted by jilljax
    I lost by Father a few months ago and he did exactly the same thing, right down to doing his own order of service, putting it on a memory stick, with a note attached telling me to "insert end date"! The only thing I had to organise was the flowers as he didn't consider that a manly decision to make. He also set up a joint account with me which contained the money to pay for the funeral, everything was in files, with the addition of a file to describe the files! It certainly helped.
    • planahead
    • By planahead 11th Nov 13, 2:21 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    planahead
    Expression of funeral wishes form
    I recently came up with a document titled, "Expression of Funeral Wishes". It's one that I compiled myself, on one A4 piece of paper. It makes it so easy to lay out one's wishes, and takes the form of a questionnaire. It's great because I am gradually handing them out to my family, and the questions are the same for everyone. Like : " how do you wish your body to be disposed of?".... "have you pre-purchased a burial plot? If so, please give plot number here............ "
    "What are your wishes regarding flowers?"...... "how do you wish to be dressed?"........ "What funeral director do you wish to be appointed?".......... and other such questions. Also included is the catch-all section, "Any other wishes regarding your funeral you want your family to be aware of?".........
    Next I will make a will and deal with other aspects of dying, but for now, I already have some piece of mind that my wishes are laid out clearly on paper, signed by myself and witnessed. I would encourage others to use such a document. Think of every question you could conceivably need answered while your loved one is yet among you to give such answers. It's quite a relief honestly.
    • planahead
    • By planahead 11th Nov 13, 2:35 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    planahead
    "peace of mind" is what I meant to write.
    • John_Pierpoint
    • By John_Pierpoint 11th Nov 13, 3:06 AM
    • 8,248 Posts
    • 7,388 Thanks
    John_Pierpoint
    Heaven forbid, but what happens, if more than one of the signatories dies at the same time?
    Originally posted by Bedsit Bob
    It depends on the legal situation if a position of trust is involved this legally trumps the rights of the trustees as individuals [Unfortunately getting such legal rights enforced, when trust has broken down and there is no honour amongst the trustees, is difficult and expensive and proof of criminal intent makes the police shy off from fraud cases].

    For trivial matters, the remaining trustee sends in the death certificate and carries on as sole trustee. [The chance of the organization checking out the original deed/will to see what is specified is slim].

    If the trustees legally own something that carries legal obligations, such as a business or land these legalities should be checked, and it might well be advisable for the remaining trustee to appoint replacement(s) even if not actually instructed to do so. Having property owned by dead people makes a legal mess; it caused extra costs and delays.
    Last edited by John_Pierpoint; 11-11-2013 at 3:16 AM.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 12th Nov 13, 6:56 PM
    • 40,030 Posts
    • 37,369 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    I recently came up with a document titled, "Expression of Funeral Wishes". It's one that I compiled myself, on one A4 piece of paper. It makes it so easy to lay out one's wishes, and takes the form of a questionnaire. It's great because I am gradually handing them out to my family, and the questions are the same for everyone. Like : " how do you wish your body to be disposed of?".... "have you pre-purchased a burial plot? If so, please give plot number here............ "
    "What are your wishes regarding flowers?"...... "how do you wish to be dressed?"........ "What funeral director do you wish to be appointed?".......... and other such questions. Also included is the catch-all section, "Any other wishes regarding your funeral you want your family to be aware of?".........
    Next I will make a will and deal with other aspects of dying, but for now, I already have some piece of mind that my wishes are laid out clearly on paper, signed by myself and witnessed. I would encourage others to use such a document. Think of every question you could conceivably need answered while your loved one is yet among you to give such answers. It's quite a relief honestly.
    Originally posted by planahead
    Perhaps I should do this over Christmas lunch?
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
    • ameliarate
    • By ameliarate 13th Nov 13, 11:14 AM
    • 6,804 Posts
    • 14,692 Thanks
    ameliarate
    Hi, was wondering if any second 'wife' or husbands out there have written a will, and what issues it bought up.

    I am a second wife, my husband has grown up children/grandchildren from a first marriage, and we have school aged children together.

    We live in a house I bought before we married and I would like it to go to my children on the basis that they are set up well -

    My health is a disaster and I am probably looking at months of life and not years. Hubby is fab, but a financial disaster - and I want the kids to be safe/roof over heads and am thinking of leaving it to them in the will.

    Is this sensible do you think?
    Originally posted by worriedmum46
    my partner and I live together - not married - both have children from previous relationships. We are being very careful to ensure that are wills express what we want clear, e.g. that the house can't be sold unless the remaining partner wants to move or meets and co-habits with/marries someone else.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; We grow old because we stop playing.
  • madbadrob
    The law actually states that estates over 5000 pounds should go to probate however banks have done their own thing and set their own values of what they believe requires probate. Joint accounts in Englandand and wales dont go to the estate and that makes lif so much easier

    Rob
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 13th Nov 13, 12:57 PM
    • 9,980 Posts
    • 34,419 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    My beloved uncle, having buried his cherished wife in the previous year, left his estate in immaculate order, with a folder clearly labelled Departures. In it was everything the checklist covers, original certificates, and a note for his son.

    Which named the two other souls who held memory sticks with all this info scanned on.

    He was much loved, much mourned & went absolutely as he wished, becuse he had planned it thus & his son was so glad to know exactly what was wanted.
  • DAN HURRELL
    do joint accounts affect third party beneficiaries?
    My parents have specified a large sum of money to be left to me on the first death. However all their savings is in joint accounts. Does this mean the money will automatically pass to the survivor so my expected inheritance will not materialize.
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