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    • charlotte1994
    • By charlotte1994 12th Feb 19, 11:16 AM
    • 481Posts
    • 755Thanks
    charlotte1994
    Rights as an engaged couple
    • #1
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:16 AM
    Rights as an engaged couple 12th Feb 19 at 11:16 AM
    I have been with my boyfriend for 6 years now, we one day want to get married but it is too expensive. I do have a worry that something will happen to either of us (especially me since I ride a motorcycle). Do you have legal rights as a fiancee like you would as a married couple, if one partner passed away?


    I remember hearing about a woman who died and her long term boyfriend of about 20 years didn't have access to her accounts or anything
Page 1
    • MovingForwards
    • By MovingForwards 12th Feb 19, 11:18 AM
    • 590 Posts
    • 669 Thanks
    MovingForwards
    • #2
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:18 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:18 AM
    Nope.
    Get wills drawn up and signed.

    A wedding doesn't have to be expensive, registry office and jobs done.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 12th Feb 19, 11:21 AM
    • 6,978 Posts
    • 7,419 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #3
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:21 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:21 AM
    I have been with my boyfriend for 6 years now, we one day want to get married but it is too expensive. - it's not. The cost is simply how much you want to spend. I do have a worry that something will happen to either of us (especially me since I ride a motorcycle). Do you have legal rights as a fiancee like you would as a married couple, if one partner passed away? - no. There are some rights as persons engaged to be married, but they are very limited


    I remember hearing about a woman who died and her long term boyfriend of about 20 years didn't have access to her accounts or anything
    Originally posted by charlotte1994


    And no reason for him to do so. They had no legal relationship
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 12th Feb 19, 11:21 AM
    • 3,710 Posts
    • 2,376 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #4
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:21 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:21 AM
    Lots of wedding/marriage threads on this forum. You can get married for 500
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 12th Feb 19, 11:23 AM
    • 2,188 Posts
    • 5,770 Thanks
    Loanranger
    • #5
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:23 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:23 AM
    No rights whatsoever. Pop down to the local registrars office and get married. The big wedding with you in the starrng role is a nonsense if you need to borrow for it or if you are renting your home or your car. The trimmings on the day are optional what is important is the marriage that follows.
    Many men do not want the Big Day, they put up with it to appease the beast!
    • Katapolt
    • By Katapolt 12th Feb 19, 11:25 AM
    • 246 Posts
    • 294 Thanks
    Katapolt
    • #6
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:25 AM
    • #6
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:25 AM
    If you're worried about the legal side of it you can get married in a registry office for around 200 inc giving notice (area depending).

    You can then save up and have the wedding celebration at a later date, but you at least have that security.
    • heartbreak_star
    • By heartbreak_star 12th Feb 19, 11:25 AM
    • 7,780 Posts
    • 17,202 Thanks
    heartbreak_star
    • #7
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:25 AM
    • #7
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:25 AM
    Have wills drawn up if you don't want to rush your wedding. But definitely get something legal in place - an engaged couple is just a romantic partnership in the eyes of the law.

    HBS x
    I believe in ordinary acts of bravery, in the courage that drives one person to stand up for another.

    #Starmer4PM
    • charlotte1994
    • By charlotte1994 12th Feb 19, 11:27 AM
    • 481 Posts
    • 755 Thanks
    charlotte1994
    • #8
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:27 AM
    • #8
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:27 AM
    No rights whatsoever. Pop down to the local registrars office and get married. The big wedding with you in the starrng role is a nonsense if you need to borrow for it or if you are renting your home or your car. The trimmings on the day are optional what is important is the marriage that follows.
    Many men do not want the Big Day, they put up with it to appease the beast!
    Originally posted by Loanranger
    I have been looking at how to get married for under 600, I would probably get married in a friends garden and buy a dress from the high street. I am not one for spending thousands on a dress!! I have thought about getting a registrar office, but my boyfriend also wants a wedding day. Problem is we don't have the 600 haha
    • charlotte1994
    • By charlotte1994 12th Feb 19, 11:28 AM
    • 481 Posts
    • 755 Thanks
    charlotte1994
    • #9
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:28 AM
    • #9
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:28 AM
    Have wills drawn up if you don't want to rush your wedding. But definitely get something legal in place - an engaged couple is just a romantic partnership in the eyes of the law.

    HBS x
    Originally posted by heartbreak_star
    I think that's probably the best bet, we want a cheap wedding but I think we would both regret it if we went to the registrars office ): I think writing a will is cheaper for the moment, thank you x
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 12th Feb 19, 11:35 AM
    • 3,710 Posts
    • 2,376 Thanks
    Robin9
    .............. I think we would both regret it if we went to the registrars office ): I think writing a will is cheaper for the moment, thank you x
    Originally posted by charlotte1994
    When writing a will - don't DIY or use a will writing service - use a solicitor
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • charlotte1994
    • By charlotte1994 12th Feb 19, 11:37 AM
    • 481 Posts
    • 755 Thanks
    charlotte1994
    When writing a will - don't DIY or use a will writing service - use a solicitor
    Originally posted by Robin9
    Oh really? What's the difference between a will writing service, are they not legally binding?
    • Grumpelstiltskin
    • By Grumpelstiltskin 12th Feb 19, 11:45 AM
    • 2,373 Posts
    • 2,593 Thanks
    Grumpelstiltskin
    If you are not married you need proper advice from a qualified solicitor, there are so many potential problems and if the wills are not watertight there can be problems.

    The cost of 2 proper wills will not be far short of the cost of a basic wedding, so it's up to you.
    • unforeseen
    • By unforeseen 12th Feb 19, 11:59 AM
    • 3,481 Posts
    • 4,647 Thanks
    unforeseen
    There are some rights as persons engaged to be married, but they are very limited
    Originally posted by Comms69
    What rights would they be?
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 12th Feb 19, 12:03 PM
    • 3,710 Posts
    • 2,376 Thanks
    Robin9
    Oh really? What's the difference between a will writing service, are they not legally binding?
    Originally posted by charlotte1994
    Yes legally binding but you get what you pay for.
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 12th Feb 19, 12:10 PM
    • 6,978 Posts
    • 7,419 Thanks
    Comms69
    What rights would they be?
    Originally posted by unforeseen


    If the engaged couple own property or land together, under certain circumstances, the property will be treated by the courts as if they were married.


    - https://www.frettens.co.uk/site/library/frettensnews/engagement-legal-implications-family-solicitor-bournemouth
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 12th Feb 19, 12:17 PM
    • 8,763 Posts
    • 28,290 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    Get a quote for mirror wills from a respectable solicitor & shop around registry offices. The differences can be minimal & as for the "we'd regret a registry office" - no, you'll seriously regret Not Getting the Paperwork Nailed.

    Frankly you've got off lucky these last 6 years, it could all go sideways fast tomorrow morning, so if you are serious about being able to look after each other in a crisis, then have that chat about 'musts' and 'would likes' in a wedding & eyeball registry offices a lot more thoroughly. (They are much much nicer than you might think!)

    They also beat the stuffing out of hospital bed weddings which only occur if the medics have signed one of you up for being dead within the week.

    Do not leave this to chance for much longer. Get a Will and/or a wedding, pronto.
    • jackieblack
    • By jackieblack 12th Feb 19, 12:34 PM
    • 8,507 Posts
    • 13,654 Thanks
    jackieblack
    If the engaged couple own property or land together, under certain circumstances, the property will be treated by the courts as if they were married.

    - https://www.frettens.co.uk/site/library/frettensnews/engagement-legal-implications-family-solicitor-bournemouth
    Originally posted by Comms69
    That's a very imprecise statement.


    Joint property owners (if joint tenants) will have certain rights, eg if the other party dies, but that is by virtue of being 'joint tenants' and nothing to do with being engaged or not.
    Last edited by jackieblack; 12-02-2019 at 1:35 PM. Reason: hurrying - wrong bit emboldened
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    • hb2
    • By hb2 12th Feb 19, 12:34 PM
    • 206 Posts
    • 405 Thanks
    hb2
    While you are sorting out your wills, consider shelling out a bit more and doing powers of attorney too. This would allow you each to,look after the affairs of the other (if you named each other as attorneys) in the event of a serious accident or illness. This can be done DIY very easily and is particularly important if you have separate bank accounts etc.
    • Thrice
    • By Thrice 12th Feb 19, 12:36 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 571 Thanks
    Thrice
    Just to throw my 2 cents worth in...

    There is nothing to stop you having a legally binding marriage ceremony now, as cheap as you can make it.

    Then have a proper wedding next year. It's not for everyone, I'm just saying you 'can' do it,

    x
    SPC010 43.19
    2019 1% = 25. 0% so far
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 12th Feb 19, 12:36 PM
    • 6,978 Posts
    • 7,419 Thanks
    Comms69
    That's a very imprecise statement.


    Joint property owners (if joint tenants) will have certain rights, eg if the other party dies, but that is by virtue of being 'joint tenants' and nothing to do with being engaged or not.
    Originally posted by jackieblack


    'Joint tenants' are still liable for IHT for example.


    But more to the point - it's about couples who own as tenants in common, usually with unequal shares.


    Given it's a direct quote from that website, by all means go and argue with the solicitors....
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