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    • charlotte1994
    • By charlotte1994 12th Feb 19, 11:16 AM
    • 503Posts
    • 790Thanks
    charlotte1994
    Rights as an engaged couple
    • #1
    • 12th Feb 19, 11:16 AM
    Rights as an engaged couple 12th Feb 19 at 11:16 AM
    I have been with my boyfriend for 6 years now, we one day want to get married but it is too expensive. I do have a worry that something will happen to either of us (especially me since I ride a motorcycle). Do you have legal rights as a fiancee like you would as a married couple, if one partner passed away?


    I remember hearing about a woman who died and her long term boyfriend of about 20 years didn't have access to her accounts or anything
Page 2
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 12th Feb 19, 12:38 PM
    • 3,785 Posts
    • 5,714 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    A very quiet registry office wedding (£120 for a weekday?) - followed by a 'big frock' church/other venue blessing and all the trimmings when you can afford it. Job done. Peace of mind all round.
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 12-02-2019 at 12:50 PM.
    • jackieblack
    • By jackieblack 12th Feb 19, 1:23 PM
    • 8,517 Posts
    • 13,665 Thanks
    jackieblack
    'Joint tenants' are still liable for IHT for example.

    But more to the point - it's about couples who own as tenants in common, usually with unequal shares.

    Given it's a direct quote from that website, by all means go and argue with the solicitors....
    Originally posted by Comms69
    I'm not arguing, it was actually the 'under certain circumstances' bit that I thought was vague, (not sure why it emboldened the other bit - possibly because I was doing it in a hurry ) - if that web page gave any further explanation or in a link to another article giving more specific detail, it would have been a lot less vague
    Last edited by jackieblack; 12-02-2019 at 1:36 PM.
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    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 12th Feb 19, 2:42 PM
    • 8,540 Posts
    • 30,009 Thanks
    Primrose
    Write a will stating your wishes, and if you subscribe to a pension fund at work, nominate your fianc! as your beneficiary in the event of your death. Covering these issues formally is the only way to ensure your wishes are implemented. Oh, and perhaps consider drawing up Powers of Attorney too for both Finance and Welfare so that you can act on behalf of one another whilst still alive. I'm unsure whether marriage would revoke them - you need to check - I know divorce or separation does but if one of you has a severe accident which puts you out of action for a while, you may need your partner to be able to handle your financial affairs or make medical decisions on your behalf.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 12th Feb 19, 2:50 PM
    • 8,801 Posts
    • 28,520 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    While I agree with LPAs, they are not free
    In England and Wales, the registration fee is £82 for each LPA – so it costs £164 to register both an LPA for property and financial affairs and an LPA for health and welfare.
    Power of Attorney | Legal issues | Age UK
    That plus the Wills - the costs of getting married (legally, as opposed to socially) are dropping like a rock.
    • Sea Shell
    • By Sea Shell 12th Feb 19, 3:23 PM
    • 1,289 Posts
    • 2,344 Thanks
    Sea Shell
    Ensure the wills are written "in contemplation of marriage to..." Otherwise, if I recall correctly, your eventual marriage will invalidate any wills done beforehand, which may or may not cause you an issue.
    " That pound I saved yesterday, is a pound I don't have to earn tomorrow "
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 12th Feb 19, 3:31 PM
    • 30,433 Posts
    • 78,090 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Ensure the wills are written "in contemplation of marriage to..." Otherwise, if I recall correctly, your eventual marriage will invalidate any wills done beforehand, which may or may not cause you an issue.
    Originally posted by Sea Shell
    This only works is the marriage actually takes place within a reasonable timeframe.
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 12th Feb 19, 3:41 PM
    • 2,191 Posts
    • 5,780 Thanks
    Loanranger
    You can't just get married in a friend's garden!
    The premises have to be licensed for weddings and the registrar has to attend and conduct the legal ceremony.
    This wedding, with registrar away from the registry office, costs more than in the registry office.
    • Grumpelstiltskin
    • By Grumpelstiltskin 12th Feb 19, 4:12 PM
    • 2,381 Posts
    • 2,603 Thanks
    Grumpelstiltskin
    You can't just get married in a friend's garden!
    The premises have to be licensed for weddings and the registrar has to attend and conduct the legal ceremony.
    This wedding, with registrar away from the registry office, costs more than in the registry office.
    Originally posted by Loanranger
    Maybe the OP lives in Scotland where the laws are different.
    • 74jax
    • By 74jax 12th Feb 19, 4:17 PM
    • 4,895 Posts
    • 6,802 Thanks
    74jax
    You can't just get married in a friend's garden!
    The premises have to be licensed for weddings and the registrar has to attend and conduct the legal ceremony.
    This wedding, with registrar away from the registry office, costs more than in the registry office.
    Originally posted by Loanranger


    Unless they are in Scotland.


    EDIT - cross posted sorry.
    Forty and fabulous, well that's what my cards say....
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 12th Feb 19, 7:28 PM
    • 5,641 Posts
    • 6,944 Thanks
    theoretica
    On of the nicest weddings I attended was almost entirely run by the guests - people cooked, took photos, played music, cleared up...
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • Mummy2cheekymonkeys
    • By Mummy2cheekymonkeys 12th Feb 19, 9:22 PM
    • 207 Posts
    • 1,445 Thanks
    Mummy2cheekymonkeys
    My husband and I got married 2 weeks ago at the local register office. The ceremony fee was £50 and we had to pay £35 each when we went to apply for our marriage licence. That's it. Anything else you pay for is your choice. My dress cost £25 and my husband wore a suit he already owned. We just went for a meal out after.
    We have 2 young children and all that mattered to us was that we were married.
    • Mrs_Ryan
    • By Mrs_Ryan 13th Feb 19, 1:35 AM
    • 10,801 Posts
    • 20,435 Thanks
    Mrs_Ryan
    Me and OH are having a civil partnership in February next year.
    We wanted to do the whole thing on the cheap but there are hidden costs everywhere..!!
    Very proud to be Open University BA (Hons) English Lang and Lit Graduate! MA English De Montfort Uni 2018- PASSED WITH MERIT!! Round 2 OU started 06/10- BSc Combined STEM, Year 1 E117 and DE100.
    Got Engaged 02/10/2018
    Miss you JV and TW
    Elle
    • Rachel83
    • By Rachel83 13th Feb 19, 8:05 AM
    • 304 Posts
    • 521 Thanks
    Rachel83
    Write a will stating your wishes, and if you subscribe to a pension fund at work, nominate your fianc! as your beneficiary in the event of your death. Covering these issues formally is the only way to ensure your wishes are implemented. Oh, and perhaps consider drawing up Powers of Attorney too for both Finance and Welfare so that you can act on behalf of one another whilst still alive. I'm unsure whether marriage would revoke them - you need to check - I know divorce or separation does but if one of you has a severe accident which puts you out of action for a while, you may need your partner to be able to handle your financial affairs or make medical decisions on your behalf.
    Originally posted by Primrose
    Nominating your fianc! doesn’t necessarily mean your fianc! will get it, next of kin can challenge this, and can win. Especially in an intestate death.
    • charlotte1994
    • By charlotte1994 13th Feb 19, 9:17 AM
    • 503 Posts
    • 790 Thanks
    charlotte1994
    My husband and I got married 2 weeks ago at the local register office. The ceremony fee was £50 and we had to pay £35 each when we went to apply for our marriage licence. That's it. Anything else you pay for is your choice. My dress cost £25 and my husband wore a suit he already owned. We just went for a meal out after.
    We have 2 young children and all that mattered to us was that we were married.
    Originally posted by Mummy2cheekymonkeys
    That sounds lovely :-) we will be getting married on the cheap, but we both want an actual wedding day (probably much shorter than most weddings though).
    • ThinkPink
    • By ThinkPink 13th Feb 19, 7:37 PM
    • 890 Posts
    • 1,772 Thanks
    ThinkPink
    Another consideration is pension. I'm sure some pension funds require you to be married to receive a spousal pension. I think my organisation changed it a few years ago that you could nominate your partner if you have lived together for more than two years, but it's definitely worth looking into.
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