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  • FIRST POST
    • kentishchap
    • By kentishchap 17th Oct 19, 10:38 AM
    • 12Posts
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    kentishchap
    Which Tree Should I Plant?
    • #1
    • 17th Oct 19, 10:38 AM
    Which Tree Should I Plant? 17th Oct 19 at 10:38 AM
    Hi

    I am a complete novice and would greatly appreciate some ideas on type of tree I should invest in.

    We live in a very busy "A" road that has traffic 24/7, our front garden is about 20 meters long. I am hoping to plant a tree that will be about 15 meters or so away from the house (should not impact light too much or hopefully damage house). It would be great if:
    - We can get a tree that looks good for us and the hundreds to view when passing.
    - Hopefully not dropping all its leaves and giving me a massive job every year..
    - Low priority - hopefully helps restrict pollution and noise.

    I thought about the Money tree, it is very slow growing but we are hoping to stay at the property for many years.

    Any ideas? Thanks
Page 1
    • Farway
    • By Farway 17th Oct 19, 1:49 PM
    • 7,757 Posts
    • 15,578 Thanks
    Farway
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 19, 1:49 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 19, 1:49 PM
    Do you mean Monkey tree not Money tree?

    Money tree is an indoor plant, Monkey tree is a monster and I certainly would not plant one in a front garden, OK if you live in a Stately Home of course

    Would leaves be a real problem? All trees, even evergreens, shed leaves

    A crab apple would be nice if you could just grin & bear the leaves once a year. There are loads of varieties with different ultimate heights and colours

    The leaves would just rot down where they fall anyway, or pick up & compost them, or wait for a windy day & it's your neighbours problem
    Last edited by Farway; 17-10-2019 at 1:51 PM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Oct 19, 1:56 PM
    • 29,764 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 19, 1:56 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 19, 1:56 PM
    - Hopefully not dropping all its leaves and giving me a massive job every year.....

    I thought about the Money tree
    Originally posted by kentishchap

    Well, you can hope!


    No idea what a 'Money Tree' is as there's nothing showing on a quick Google that would last 10 minutes of bad weather in a UK garden.


    Me, I'd go for Crategus persimilis 'Prunifolia.' (Those Romans never got their plants muddled-up!)



    https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/89242/Crataegus-persimilis-Prunifolia/Details
    Things are more like they are right now than they've ever been.




    • kentishchap
    • By kentishchap 17th Oct 19, 2:29 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    kentishchap
    • #4
    • 17th Oct 19, 2:29 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Oct 19, 2:29 PM
    Apologies - it was a type I meant Monkey Tree.

    Are there reasons not to go for a Monkey tree? I was a little deterred due to the slow growth rate but do like the look of them.

    Regarding leaves I dont actually mind the labour work of picking the leaves up, but was more concerned with trees that shed all their leaves over winter. As in opinion they look a bit ugly until spring when the leaves regrow.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 17th Oct 19, 3:57 PM
    • 7,757 Posts
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    Farway
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 19, 3:57 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 19, 3:57 PM
    Apologies - it was a type I meant Monkey Tree.

    Are there reasons not to go for a Monkey tree? I was a little deterred due to the slow growth rate but do like the look of them.
    Originally posted by kentishchap

    Although slow growing they will get huge and I mean HUGE ideal in a park. May not cause you problems for a while but subsequent buyers will curse you. It's a forest tree
    https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/trees-woods-and-wildlife/british-trees/a-z-of-british-trees/monkey-puzzle/

    • Ultimate height Higher than 12 metres
    • Ultimate spread wider than 8 metres
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 18th Oct 19, 7:09 AM
    • 1,478 Posts
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    Apodemus
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 19, 7:09 AM
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 19, 7:09 AM
    Another vote for avoiding the monkeys! I donít think iíve ever seen one, in a domestic situation, where it has been appropriate.

    Iíd go for something native. Daveís Crataegus is indeed a lovely tree, and a good suggestion, but bear in mind it is a hawthorn and it depends on your situation whether thorns are going to be a good thing!

    There are some nice Rowan (Sorbus) cultivars around that give the same mix of all-season interest as the Crataegus in a similar sized-tree and without the thorns.
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 18th Oct 19, 8:20 AM
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    martinthebandit
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 19, 8:20 AM
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 19, 8:20 AM
    A few or consider https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/blog/2019/03/british-trees-to-plant-in-your-garden/

    If you don't find joy in the snow,
    remember you'll have less joy in your life


    ...but still have the same amount of snow!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Oct 19, 8:25 AM
    • 29,764 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 19, 8:25 AM
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 19, 8:25 AM

    There are some nice Rowan (Sorbus) cultivars around that give the same mix of all-season interest as the Crataegus in a similar sized-tree and without the thorns.
    Originally posted by Apodemus
    My argument with Rowans is that I have never grown a good one. I've probably got half a dozen knocking around the place at present and they are too sparse.

    In our previous garden, I planted a named variety ....except that it wasn't what the nursery said it was; just plain old Sorbus aucuparia. However, it was some years before I realised.

    In the garden before that, I planted Sorbus vilmorinii and that did really well.....after we'd sold the house!

    So, I'd say don't buy the bog standard Sorbus, which can be had for a few quid, but splash out on a named one with a RHS AGM: something like Sheerwater Seedling or Streetwise.

    Plenty to consider here:

    https://www.hillier.co.uk/trees/products/a-to-z/

    I prefer the Whitebeams .
    Last edited by Davesnave; 18-10-2019 at 8:49 AM. Reason: formatting...roll on the new Forum!
    Things are more like they are right now than they've ever been.




    • kentishchap
    • By kentishchap 18th Oct 19, 10:34 AM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    kentishchap
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 19, 10:34 AM
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 19, 10:34 AM
    Thanks for the replied.

    Never even heard of the trees mentioned, the site mentioned (https://www.hillier.co.uk/trees/products/a-to-z/) looks great and very detailed - I have a job for the weekend
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 18th Oct 19, 11:33 AM
    • 9,744 Posts
    • 17,163 Thanks
    andrewf75
    I'd probably also avoid the monkey puzzle, but at 15m away from the house I think you could get away with it if you really want one.

    Cotoneaster Cornubia is a non-native alternatve to Hawthorn and has the advantage of being semi evergreen.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Oct 19, 11:52 AM
    • 29,764 Posts
    • 102,807 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Cotoneaster Cornubia is a non-native alternatve to Hawthorn and has the advantage of being semi evergreen.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    Yes, it's one of my go-to trees, or it can be kept smaller by pruning.


    In my last garden, the berries persisted till the Redwings had them in early winter. They were a little messy, but there was a bonus in the fact that the birds left 'presents,' which would turn into hollies and other useful plants!
    Things are more like they are right now than they've ever been.




    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 19th Oct 19, 7:50 AM
    • 1,478 Posts
    • 1,244 Thanks
    Apodemus
    My argument with Rowans is that I have never grown a good one. I've probably got half a dozen knocking around the place at present and they are too sparse.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Yes, I know what you mean. I have a few that I am still in two minds about whether they are going to be grown as standards or go for a multi-stemmed approach with an overall lanceolate shape. There is a lovely one down the road from me growing wild out of an old wall which has a really nice multi-stemmed shape, having been grazed off by the deer when it was smaller.

    How about an Ornas birch for the OP? No flowers or berries but it is a very attractive tree in all seasons with deeply indented leaves and gives a nice dappled light through the summer. There are two outside my south-facing office window and they provide interest all year and just the right amount of sunlight in the summer without the office baking in the direct sun.
    • fatbelly
    • By fatbelly 19th Oct 19, 8:32 AM
    • 14,307 Posts
    • 11,320 Thanks
    fatbelly
    I've always wanted one of these, which I think are beautiful.

    cornus controversa 'variegata' (wedding-cake tree)

    Slow growing, deciduous, variegated but doesn't revert. Claims it can grow to 15m are a bit optimistic. A friend has a really mature one that is more like 5m.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 19th Oct 19, 9:47 AM
    • 7,757 Posts
    • 15,578 Thanks
    Farway
    I've always wanted one of these, which I think are beautiful.
    cornus controversa 'variegata' (wedding-cake tree)

    Slow growing, deciduous, variegated but doesn't revert. Claims it can grow to 15m are a bit optimistic. A friend has a really mature one that is more like 5m.
    Originally posted by fatbelly
    I've seen those and agree.
    If I had space I'd have one like a shot, likewise http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/7426.shtml which is a showstopper
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 19th Oct 19, 10:10 AM
    • 29,764 Posts
    • 102,807 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Hmmm....I'd forgotten the Cornus, but now you mention it, my wife has plans for the front garden which might involve that or Betula utilis Jaquemontii 'Snow Queen.'


    She can't have both, due to a drive and an existing Oak, but I think the Cornus might be the better choice for eventual size. Love the winter birches in Rosemoor though.
    Things are more like they are right now than they've ever been.




    • kentishchap
    • By kentishchap 19th Oct 19, 11:00 AM
    • 12 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    kentishchap
    The Cornus controversa looks amazing, unless I can find something better I will go with this. Never seen one in real life, but the pics on the net look great
    • Waterlily24
    • By Waterlily24 19th Oct 19, 12:44 PM
    • 1,254 Posts
    • 694 Thanks
    Waterlily24
    Weve got a wedding-cake tree in our garden and it does look lovely. Could never understand why it's called a wedding-cake tree though. I know it's because of the layers but.....
    • Waterlily24
    • By Waterlily24 24th Oct 19, 1:05 PM
    • 1,254 Posts
    • 694 Thanks
    Waterlily24
    https://ibb.co/5M4Jj9y


    This is our wedding cake tree, I think we planted it a bit too close to an acer.
    One of the branches seems to have died off no idea why and wonder if we should cut it off.
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