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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Rebecca
    • By Former MSE Rebecca 11th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    • 113Posts
    • 96Thanks
    Former MSE Rebecca
    It's aitch not haitch
    • #1
    • 11th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    It's aitch not haitch 11th Nov 14 at 11:48 AM
    Does it drive you up the wall when people 'literally' die laughing? Or how about those who give 110%?



    Check out Martin's top 10 list for word pedants

    Hit "reply" to add yours!

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 06-10-2017 at 1:02 PM.
Page 3
    • kittykitten
    • By kittykitten 12th Nov 14, 11:23 AM
    • 412 Posts
    • 1,018 Thanks
    kittykitten
    "Me and Fred are going...." Argh! Unless someone named "Me" is going with Fred, of course!
    Originally posted by Bennifred
    Microsoft word corrects sentences in this way sometimes, even when set to UK English! I've never understood why it insists on changing ...and I to me and...

    It doesn't even do it consistently.
    OS weight loss challenge: 4.5/6 lbs
    • davetrousers
    • By davetrousers 12th Nov 14, 11:26 AM
    • 5,639 Posts
    • 4,881 Thanks
    davetrousers
    I despise "verbed nouns", there is a word for this but I can't remember it.

    Sourced. Jack and Jill did not go up the hill to source a pail of water!
    .....

    • davetrousers
    • By davetrousers 12th Nov 14, 11:29 AM
    • 5,639 Posts
    • 4,881 Thanks
    davetrousers
    Microsoft word corrects sentences in this way sometimes, even when set to UK English! I've never understood why it insists on changing ...and I to me and...

    It doesn't even do it consistently.
    Originally posted by kittykitten
    If you don't include the other person what would you say?

    I went to the shops, therefore it's, John and I went to the shops.

    This present is from me, therefore it's, this present is from John and me.

    Pretty simple really.
    .....

  • Frewen98
    'at the end of the day' another meaningless phrase
    • 3guesses
    • By 3guesses 12th Nov 14, 12:40 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    3guesses
    The four that currently spring to my mind:

    I agree with LV Sue on the "different than" issue, a simply horrific americanism that I have even heard our Oxford-educated Prime Minister use at PMQs.

    Starting sentences with "Look, ...": very prevalent amongst politicians during interviews, especially those of a New Labour [spit!] persuasion; prominent examples would include Tony B Liar and Ed Balls. If anybody has to use "Look, ..." at the start of a sentence then this indicates to me that they simply do not have a coherent argument.

    "Obsessed by": people are not obsessed by something, they are obsessed with something.

    "And that's all from X and I": people really show their utter grammatical ignorance when they incorrectly use "I" instead of "me" in this type of construction, presumably in the mistaken belief that they are actually being grammatically correct! I have noticed that this is particularly prevalent amongst [overpaid] BBC newsreaders, many of whom have again enjoyed an Oxford education.

    I'm sure there are more that drive me nuts!
    • davetrousers
    • By davetrousers 12th Nov 14, 12:45 PM
    • 5,639 Posts
    • 4,881 Thanks
    davetrousers
    Someone has just posted a new thread entitled "Please critique this passive portfolio"

    I find this really uncomfortable to read.
    .....

    • 3guesses
    • By 3guesses 12th Nov 14, 12:48 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    3guesses
    Ah yes, one more has just sprung to mind: whenever I hear "it was proved..." my hair stands on end! Is it just me or should it not be "it was proven..."?
    • kenpitfield
    • By kenpitfield 12th Nov 14, 12:56 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    kenpitfield
    Using the word guys as a collective name for a group of ladies and gentlemen. Guys and Gals would be more accurate but still not really suitable.
    Also free and firty free for three and thirty three is heard more and more. Why aren't teachers correcting this?
    • Spamalert
    • By Spamalert 12th Nov 14, 1:19 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    Spamalert
    So .......
    Why have people started to begin sentences with "so..." Is it an import from over the pond?

    'So' should be used to qualify or add to something that's been said already.
    Originally posted by Flumina
    These sometimes annoying words or phrases do have a purpose. I often miss the beginning of a sentence when someone starts talking because I am not used to their voice, the accent, the speed of their speech etc, so I don't mind people starting to speak with a non-useful word at the beginning; "so" seems to be the current favourite. This is particularly important in news reports. These words also help the speaker to launch into what they want to say.

    It would be nice to have more variety though.
    • elliebellie
    • By elliebellie 12th Nov 14, 2:05 PM
    • 136 Posts
    • 74 Thanks
    elliebellie
    "Learn. We need to teach you that if you say "I’ll learn you how to do it" I won’t listen"

    I always thought that "to learn someone" was wrong, however historically it is correct.

    "The transitive sense (He learned me how to read), now vulgar, was acceptable from c.1200 until early 19c., from Old English lran "to teach" (cognates: Dutch leren, German lehren "to teach," literally "to make known;" see lore), and is preserved in past participle adjective learned "having knowledge gained by study." - from the Online Eytmology Dictionary

    My personal pet-hate - loose and lose - drives me nuts!!!
    • MaryEllen
    • By MaryEllen 12th Nov 14, 2:07 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    MaryEllen
    * This is an asterisk, not an Asterix
    * is an asterisk, not an Asterix. People who get it wrong Gaul me!
    • ollybass
    • By ollybass 12th Nov 14, 2:14 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    ollybass
    Customers to shop staff 'can I get' no you cant, the staff are paid to get it for you. So please say 'can I have'
    Originally posted by McKneff
    Not really !! ... "Can I have" means "am I able to have". The precise request should be "may I have".
    • Lwsi
    • By Lwsi 12th Nov 14, 2:26 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 46 Thanks
    Lwsi
    I disabused him of this theory
    Does this mean "I corrected him?".
    • adouglasmhor
    • By adouglasmhor 12th Nov 14, 2:30 PM
    • 14,571 Posts
    • 21,365 Thanks
    adouglasmhor
    People who attempt to correct me for my reply of "I'm good" when they ask how I am, if they want me to say "I'm well" they should ask only about my health not my whole being.

    http://motivatedgrammar.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/the-im-good-outrage-is-nonsense/
    The truth may be out there, but the lies are inside your head. Terry Pratchett


    http.thisisnotalink.cm
    • Lwsi
    • By Lwsi 12th Nov 14, 2:32 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 46 Thanks
    Lwsi
    I find it irritating when shop assistants or anyone who doesn't know me says " take care now" as I'm leaving. I feel like saying "well, I was going to be reckless but I won't now that you've told me not to!"
  • capitanh
    A few more
    Some that annoy me:
    "outside of" - no need for the of
    "print off" - no need for the off
    "reach out to" - particularly annoying when people just mean contact. Unless they really do mean to extend your arms towards someone else...
    • TeddyG
    • By TeddyG 12th Nov 14, 3:37 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    TeddyG
    Customers to shop staff 'can I get' no you cant, the staff are paid to get it for you. So please say 'can I have'
    Originally posted by McKneff
    Used all the time by Australians.
    • TeddyG
    • By TeddyG 12th Nov 14, 3:50 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    TeddyG
    There is only one 'r' in drawing yet many people including radio and TV announcers insist on saying 'drawring'.
    • jsrees
    • By jsrees 12th Nov 14, 3:54 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    jsrees
    6th/etc
    sixth mispronounced as sikth - there should be an s sound in the middle of the word
    and
    etcetera pronounced as ekcetera

    and while I'm on a roll:
    etc, etc, etc - this is tautologous. Etcetera means 'and all the rest' so it doesn't make sense to repeat it.
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 12th Nov 14, 3:59 PM
    • 4,440 Posts
    • 3,990 Thanks
    Ebe Scrooge
    When people say "axe" instead of "ask". No you can't "axe me a question" !!
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