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  • FIRST POST
    • top_drawer
    • By top_drawer 18th Oct 09, 3:07 PM
    • 2,460Posts
    • 3,825Thanks
    top_drawer
    The London Mint Office - scam?
    • #1
    • 18th Oct 09, 3:07 PM
    The London Mint Office - scam? 18th Oct 09 at 3:07 PM
    hi,

    I have been seeing the ads on television a lot recently for a free Golden Britannia penny so rang and applied .... I received a letter stating that my appl has been assepted and its on it way.... where is the catch?

    TD
Page 7
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 22nd Jun 19, 3:19 PM
    • 340 Posts
    • 262 Thanks
    hybernia
    I bought a 2019 into the dragons liar half sovereign. Things dont add up.
    My insurance company says its not a real coin. So I look on the website. No mention of the half sovereign anymore. There is a quarter sovereign for sale, but the details are wrong.
    My half sovereign is 19.3mm diameter. 3.99g weight.
    the quarter sovereign on sale. 22.05mm and 7.8g. a real quarter sovereign is 13.5mm diameter and only 2g in weight.
    which means the quarter now on sale is nearly twice the weight and nearly 3mm larger than the half sovereign they sent me....
    Originally posted by Paul251
    Unfortunately, Paul, you seem to be making the mistake of regarding the "coin" as being something of genuine provenance and genuine worth. But it has neither. The London Mint Office is a name deliberately chosen and used to mislead the unwary into thinking that (a) it's "official" (b) it's in London (c) it is licensed to produce coinage that's legal tender.

    None of the foregoing is true. It's a business whose actual connection to coins of the realm is primarily to pocket as much of those itself. There's no reason why a London Mint Office quarter sovereign should be vieweby anyone as a serious, credible entity, when it's anything but, and no reason why this firm should not make up coin names and coin dimensions as it goes along (it seems to, anyway).

    Your Dragons' Liar description is especially felicitous: well done. though am a bit surprised your insurer would take seriously the wares of this outfit.

    As has been the case for a long time, those with an interest in different kinds of mint, be they official, or in London, or neither, may find there's more value for money in a packet of Polos by Rowntree / Nestle.
    • nicholasbeta
    • By nicholasbeta 18th Oct 19, 12:33 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    nicholasbeta
    Official anywhere but in London
    I ordered a WW1 commemoration coin from London Mint Office for 2.50, which may be a loss-leader as the coin arrived in an elegant presentation package with space for seven more. It appears to be a respectable coin, but bears the word 'GIBRALTAR', and if you look carefully at LMO's top web page you will see this. Oddly, LMO's text does not mention Gibraltar, although it lists a number of countries for which it claims to be an official distributor. The Royal Mint tells me to refer to the Gibraltar Monetary Authority, no reference to which I can find. However, the coin bears the Queen's head and the face value 'Half Crown', and Gibraltar coins are legal currency in UK, so presumably it is technically worth 12.5 p. So if it is endorsed by Gibraltar by appointment to etc, fine, otherwise there may be accommodation waiting for someone in the Tower of London.
    • George Michael
    • By George Michael 18th Oct 19, 2:42 PM
    • 3,465 Posts
    • 4,664 Thanks
    George Michael
    Gibraltar coins are legal currency in UK
    Originally posted by nicholasbeta
    No they aren't. The only currency that classes as legal tender in the UK are Sterling coins and notes issued by either the Royal Mint (coins) of the Bank of England (notes).
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 18th Oct 19, 3:49 PM
    • 12,335 Posts
    • 10,919 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    No they aren't. The only currency that classes as legal tender in the UK are Sterling coins and notes issued by either the Royal Mint (coins) of the Bank of England (notes).
    Originally posted by George Michael
    Not quite correct, Scotland has its own banknotes issued by 3 Scottish banks
    • George Michael
    • By George Michael 18th Oct 19, 4:59 PM
    • 3,465 Posts
    • 4,664 Thanks
    George Michael
    Not quite correct, Scotland has its own banknotes issued by 3 Scottish banks
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    I know, but even though they are Sterling banknotes, they are still not classed as legal tender. They are legal currency but not legal tender (even in Scotland itself).
    https://www.scotbanks.org.uk/banknotes/legal-position.html

    Scottish Banknotes are legal currency i.e. they are approved by the UK Parliament. However, Scottish Bank notes are not Legal Tender, not even in Scotland.
    • accorian
    • By accorian 18th Oct 19, 5:17 PM
    • 27 Posts
    • 39 Thanks
    accorian
    As someone unfortunate enough to have to live in Carlisle, I can assure you that day in, day out, "Scottish" bank notes are passed back and forth here between customers and retailers. Nobody stops to get into arcane arguments about what's legal tender and what isn't. then again, nobody seemingly remembers that Scotland had its own bank and banknotes before the Bank of England.



    I can't imagine trying to pass a Scottish note in some far-flung foreign terrain like Surrey, but in northern England -- and especially, the Border Lands -- it's anything but unusual or comment worthy.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 18th Oct 19, 6:14 PM
    • 12,335 Posts
    • 10,919 Thanks
    lincroft1710

    I can't imagine trying to pass a Scottish note in some far-flung foreign terrain like Surrey, but in northern England -- and especially, the Border Lands -- it's anything but unusual or comment worthy.
    Originally posted by accorian
    Even 50 yrs ago as far south as Scotch Corner (N Yorks), Scottish banknotes were accepted without question
    • Xircom
    • By Xircom 6th Nov 19, 5:00 PM
    • 46 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Xircom
    LMO Return
    Hello

    so I had a delivery today addressed to me for a coin I looked at but never ordered and never completed any purchase details, no credit card, no bank nothing. So I called answer machine, I emailed no response so this is what I did
    I wrapped it backup in original packaging
    I then placed in a seal envelope with a note outlining my conditions, cold telephone call 25.00 Ex Vat, Cold Email 130.00 Ex Vat Cold Letter 300.00 Ex VAT, Cold Package 500.00 Ex VAT I explained that I consider this unsolicited mail / marketing which is illegal, and if they send any more letters, packages to myself, my company or any members of my family I will take legal action ; I then placed that envelope in side another envelope with a note saying "thank you for opening this package, with opening this parcel you agree to my terms and conditions" I then sent this back to the London Office (Not the PO Box in Cardiff) sent it Tracked, Insured and they have to sign for it.

    Fun being that when they open it it all above board they have agreed to my T&C so when I get the next letter or delivery I will invoice them accordingly and after 30 days I start a CCJ against them for unpaid invoice in accordance with my Terms and Conditions as agreed when they opened the package. Cost Return 4.00 to open a CCJ 35.00 fun value priceless........
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 6th Nov 19, 7:46 PM
    • 23,877 Posts
    • 64,279 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Hello

    so I had a delivery today addressed to me for a coin I looked at but never ordered and never completed any purchase details, no credit card, no bank nothing.
    Originally posted by Xircom
    If you just looked at the coin, how did they get hold of your address?
    • hpuse
    • By hpuse 6th Nov 19, 9:32 PM
    • 1,093 Posts
    • 154 Thanks
    hpuse
    If you just looked at the coin, how did they get hold of your address?
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    There may be virus(es) in that PC 😊
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 7th Nov 19, 1:39 PM
    • 340 Posts
    • 262 Thanks
    hybernia
    Hello

    so I had a delivery today addressed to me for a coin I looked at but never ordered and never completed any purchase details, no credit card, no bank nothing. So I called answer machine, I emailed no response so this is what I did
    I wrapped it backup in original packaging
    I then placed in a seal envelope with a note outlining my conditions, cold telephone call 25.00 Ex Vat, Cold Email 130.00 Ex Vat Cold Letter 300.00 Ex VAT, Cold Package 500.00 Ex VAT I explained that I consider this unsolicited mail / marketing which is illegal, and if they send any more letters, packages to myself, my company or any members of my family I will take legal action ; I then placed that envelope in side another envelope with a note saying "thank you for opening this package, with opening this parcel you agree to my terms and conditions" I then sent this back to the London Office (Not the PO Box in Cardiff) sent it Tracked, Insured and they have to sign for it.

    Fun being that when they open it it all above board they have agreed to my T&C so when I get the next letter or delivery I will invoice them accordingly and after 30 days I start a CCJ against them for unpaid invoice in accordance with my Terms and Conditions as agreed when they opened the package. Cost Return 4.00 to open a CCJ 35.00 fun value priceless........
    Originally posted by Xircom

    Sorry to have to say this, but your post gives every impression of being written by someone more interested in showing off like a barrack room lawyer than an individual legitimately worried about how your personal details came to be in the hands of this outfit.


    Playing games -- as you are -- with these people is absolutely not to be recommended, unless you've an inexplicable desire to waste your time on them.



    You can't invent a load of waffle and then contend that waffle represents the terms and conditions of a meaningful legal contract: a Distroct judge would laugh you out of court, with perhaps a fine for wasting her / his time. Nor can you claim (unless you want to look like a complete fool) that someone opening an envelope in order to access its contents is ipso facto bound by whatever nonsensical T&Cs might've been dreamt up and stuffed inside it.



    Unless you are a VAT registered trader, telling folks that your charges are exclusive of VAT is an embarrassing irrelevance and made all the more so in light of the fact that the Courts have held that VAT is levyable on goods and services, but not on any kind of imposed penalty. Your apparent lack of acquaintance with 1999 legislation relating to unfair terms in contracts isn't helping you much, either.


    It would seem that the most useful activity you can undertake is to follow the advice of other posters here and subject your computer to a thorough virus scan. After all: there must be some explanation for The London Mint Office suddenly entering your life in the way you describe.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 7th Nov 19, 2:44 PM
    • 7,002 Posts
    • 11,285 Thanks
    Malthusian
    If you just looked at the coin, how did they get hold of your address?
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    London Mint Office coins have terms & conditions etched into the inside of the coin which say "By looking at this coin you agree to psychically transmit your name and address to us and consent to us processing your data for the purpose of sending you tat in the hope you will buy it".
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 7th Nov 19, 3:58 PM
    • 23,877 Posts
    • 64,279 Thanks
    Pollycat
    London Mint Office coins have terms & conditions etched into the inside of the coin which say "By looking at this coin you agree to psychically transmit your name and address to us and consent to us processing your data for the purpose of sending you tat in the hope you will buy it".
    Originally posted by Malthusian
    Ah, yes.
    Of course.
    Silly me.
    There may be virus(es) in that PC 😊
    Originally posted by hpuse
    Or maybe this ^^^^ is the answer...
    • tempus_fugit
    • By tempus_fugit 7th Nov 19, 4:11 PM
    • 792 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    tempus_fugit
    I know, but even though they are Sterling banknotes, they are still not classed as legal tender. They are legal currency but not legal tender (even in Scotland itself).
    https://www.scotbanks.org.uk/banknotes/legal-position.html
    Originally posted by George Michael
    Which is actually what nicholasbeta said, they never claimed that they were legal tender.
    Retired at age 56 after having "light bulb moment" due to reading MSE and its forums. Have been converted to the "budget to zero" concept and use YNAB for all monthly budgeting and long term goals.

    Pedant point: There is no such word or construction as "I's", the word to use is "my".
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