Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • helen949
    • By helen949 3rd Oct 19, 2:10 PM
    • 1Posts
    • 3Thanks
    helen949
    Are competition T&Cs legally binding?
    • #1
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:10 PM
    Are competition T&Cs legally binding? 3rd Oct 19 at 2:10 PM
    I was extremely lucky to win a car last week. I'm young and I want to make a sensible financial decision as I don't have a mortgage or any savings to speak of. I feel like the best way to this would be to sell the car when I get it (please don't bombard me with stuff about ethics) but the competition T&Cs say that I have agreed to be the legal owner of the car for at least one year.

    So my question is, are T&Cs legally binding? If so, how can they enforce this? Does anyone have any experience of this?

    Thanks in advance!
Page 1
    • moreofthegoodstuff
    • By moreofthegoodstuff 3rd Oct 19, 2:17 PM
    • 621 Posts
    • 10,180 Thanks
    moreofthegoodstuff
    • #2
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:17 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:17 PM
    I personally wouldn’t risk it. If they are giving away a car, it’s nothing for them to get a solicitor involved if they feel you haven’t acted correctly following winning the prize. Nobody can tell you 100% if it’s legally binding because nobody knows what the courts might take on, if they want to take it further I’m sure they can and will find a way.
    • kimzeey
    • By kimzeey 3rd Oct 19, 2:37 PM
    • 63 Posts
    • 2,267 Thanks
    kimzeey
    • #3
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:37 PM
    • #3
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:37 PM
    If it's in the terms and conditions then it is something they can charge you and take you to court for if you sell it.
    Little Things Make A Big Difference Comping Is My little Thing That Makes A Big Difference On My Wellbeing
    • Tuppence11
    • By Tuppence11 3rd Oct 19, 2:54 PM
    • 42 Posts
    • 632 Thanks
    Tuppence11
    • #4
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:54 PM
    • #4
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:54 PM
    Still unsure? You could always seek information at the Citizens Advice Bureau - usually very popular, so this might take a while to speak to someone.
    • browna
    • By browna 3rd Oct 19, 2:59 PM
    • 71 Posts
    • 3,187 Thanks
    browna
    • #5
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:59 PM
    • #5
    • 3rd Oct 19, 2:59 PM
    what car was it? if its expensive to insure/run you could store it for a year to retain its value. I wouldn't want to risk selling it incase they decided to take action (unlikely granted), keep it a year or two and you'll still get a tidy sum for it.
    You can't always get what you want... but if you try sometimes, well, you just might find.. you get what you need.
    • Sekar
    • By Sekar 3rd Oct 19, 3:00 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 70 Thanks
    Sekar
    • #6
    • 3rd Oct 19, 3:00 PM
    • #6
    • 3rd Oct 19, 3:00 PM
    If they can afford to take legal action and you can't then it's effectively binding by default. The question then becomes can you sell it without them realising? If they're in the motor trade then I imagine they have the tools to trace ownership and could do so at any point.


    It seems like needless risk to me.


    Have you looked at what the drop in value would be in a years time?
    • Spudtm
    • By Spudtm 3rd Oct 19, 3:14 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 1,093 Thanks
    Spudtm
    • #7
    • 3rd Oct 19, 3:14 PM
    • #7
    • 3rd Oct 19, 3:14 PM
    As browna suggests keep it and store it. Best to lose value than lose it completely.
    • sleepyjones
    • By sleepyjones 3rd Oct 19, 4:11 PM
    • 4,800 Posts
    • 349,469 Thanks
    sleepyjones
    • #8
    • 3rd Oct 19, 4:11 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Oct 19, 4:11 PM
    Not worth it, if it was a 12k car and you managed to sell it for 10k ... they find out, take you to court you'd be liable for the value of the car, which was 12k ... so technically you'd be out of pocket 2k.
    *Good Luck * Be Lucky * Stay Lucky*
    • mjm3346
    • By mjm3346 3rd Oct 19, 4:24 PM
    • 41,385 Posts
    • 326,100 Thanks
    mjm3346
    • #9
    • 3rd Oct 19, 4:24 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Oct 19, 4:24 PM
    Don't forget they could come after you for the value of the car which will certainly be more than you could sell it for, so you would potentially not only lose the prize but end up owing them as well (without counting legal costs).


    Move to chat requested


    (Usually you will have agreed to the T&Cs as part of the entry process)
    Last edited by mjm3346; 03-10-2019 at 4:29 PM.
    Internet goodness 27199
    • Blulu
    • By Blulu 3rd Oct 19, 5:15 PM
    • 6,280 Posts
    • 115,606 Thanks
    Blulu
    Another option is to ask the comp host and see if they will give you permission. Perhaps leave it a month or two and then contact them with an 'i'm broke and I can't afford to run a car' sob story. They might agree for you to sell it on.

    Blu XXX
    Comping fairy fly to me. Make my bells go tinkle.
    Get your dust out for the lads, and let me have a sprinkle.
    • DJASKEW
    • By DJASKEW 3rd Oct 19, 6:19 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    DJASKEW
    Being such a big prize you can expect some follow up from the promoter
    If they’re paying the tax on it or something similar they may find out if it changes ownership.
    • Christine Bacon
    • By Christine Bacon 15th Oct 19, 4:33 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 77 Thanks
    Christine Bacon
    I wouldn't risk it
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,774Posts Today

7,647Users online

Martin's Twitter