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    • Gary_Dexter
    • By Gary_Dexter 9th Oct 19, 8:39 AM
    • 6,596 Posts
    • 4,424 Thanks
    Gary_Dexter
    Post title makes no sense at all.

    As for referring to a post in The Mirror (of all places!!) from 2014 is just bizarre.
    • Ergates
    • By Ergates 9th Oct 19, 9:23 AM
    • 615 Posts
    • 821 Thanks
    Ergates
    I hear the phrase quite often and take it to mean that "one is not happy"
    Originally posted by bertiewhite
    In which part of the country is that?
    • Chino
    • By Chino 9th Oct 19, 9:39 AM
    • 1,118 Posts
    • 750 Thanks
    Chino
    but any natural Brit will understand.
    Originally posted by johndavid29c
    This one didn't.

    They have nothing better to do than pick holes in posts
    Originally posted by johndavid29c
    It's not about trying to pick holes, it's about trying to understand the gibberish that some people write on these forums. If others can't understand what a poster has written, it's a waste both of the poster's time in writing the post and a reader's time in reading the post. As this thread has demonstrated.
    • oldagetraveller
    • By oldagetraveller 9th Oct 19, 9:46 AM
    • 3,437 Posts
    • 1,930 Thanks
    oldagetraveller
    " Apparently it's from Manchester - though I've family from Manchester and I've *never* heard that expression before."
    I'm from Manchester originally and it was used quite regularly. Probably not used any more and as a result "family" have never heard it.
    "He saw his a r s e", i.e. somewhat annoyed about something.
    As a result, I fully understood what the o.p. was saying. Certainly not gibberish to me.

    It's now trendy to refer to a four legged animal rather than the proper Queen's English version! Hopefully some of the more ill informed individuals have now learned something from north of Watford?
    Last edited by oldagetraveller; 09-10-2019 at 9:50 AM.
    R.I.P. U.K. Democracy.
    • JuicyJesus
    • By JuicyJesus 9th Oct 19, 9:49 AM
    • 3,655 Posts
    • 4,161 Thanks
    JuicyJesus
    "Oh no," thinks Barclays, "unprofitable customers that cost us money we'll never make back in transaction fees won't use us any more and will instead incur those costs with other banks." Crying, it muses: "Our a*se has been well and truly seen here."
    urs sinserly,
    ~~joosy jeezus~~
    • IanManc
    • By IanManc 9th Oct 19, 10:05 AM
    • 909 Posts
    • 1,687 Thanks
    IanManc
    According to the article, "See your !!!!" means "Be annoyed". Apparently it's from Manchester - though I've family from Manchester and I've *never* heard that expression before.

    However, if we we accept the meaning from The Mirror (because The Mirror has never been known to publish falsehoods) it still doesn't make sense in the given context.

    Barclays have, seemingly, withdrawn counter services from post office branches - why does that make them annoyed?
    Originally posted by Ergates
    I'm, roughly, from around there and have never heard it before either.
    Originally posted by boo_star
    I was brought up in Manchester and I understood exactly what the OP meant.

    To see one's a**e means:
    1. to lose one's temper, or
    2. to flounce off.

    So, as an example of the second definition, someone might notice that a person has disappeared from a group in a pub and ask where he was, and get the reply: "His wife told him he wasn't having another pint and he saw his a**e".

    The OP has used it to suggest that Barclays has in some way fallen out of love with the Post Office by no longer letting customers use its services to withdraw cash, and so it does make sense, and I got the point immediately.

    However the phrase is colloquial and clearly some people didn't understand it.
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 9th Oct 19, 10:11 AM
    • 4,093 Posts
    • 705 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    I donít know whether people are just being bloody awkward here because OP said itís instead of its, but as I type that on my phone it tries to autocorrect it to itís each time.

    Or whether these people genuinely havenít heard the term to have seen ones back end.

    If itís the former it doesnít surprise me as people just love to be difficult it seems.

    If itís the latter then Iím confused as Iím sure these will be the same people who harp on (is that another phrase you havenít heard?????!) about using Ďthe search functioní. Well perhaps try Google for the phrase and see what it returns instead of making a big song & dance about it.

    For the record I hear the phrase frequently. Iím sure thereís some southern phrases Iíve never heard of before. Big deal.

    • Uxb1
    • By Uxb1 9th Oct 19, 11:29 AM
    • 277 Posts
    • 389 Thanks
    Uxb1
    As a born and bred southerner I too had no idea what the OP's original phrase meant.
    Anyway to get back to the subject.....
    Barclays clearly feel that the amount they pay in transaction fees to the Post Office each time for letting their customer take out cash from the PO for free is not worth anything in terms of customer retention etc and it's simply not worth the aggro anymore.
    Those Barclays customers who rarely use cash anymore will not be bothered.
    Those who are outraged will move to another bank and quite possibly Barclays will be better off not having to deal with them anymore.

    It it odd then when a legacy bank breaks the established way of things people are outraged but when it's a Challenger Bank (say becomes app only) then it's them being modern and moving with the times and how we bank today and its all no problem.
    As I've said on here prior - its all been seen before when ATM's and bank cash cards were introduced in the 1970's and the facility to write a cheque to "pay cash" and present it at the bank teller/clerk for them to hand over the notes was withdrawn: now how outrageous was that!!
    To be honest in today's increasingly cashless society I've no idea why people have a need to regularly withdraw cash from their account anyway.
    • Fingerbobs
    • By Fingerbobs 9th Oct 19, 11:33 AM
    • 777 Posts
    • 315 Thanks
    Fingerbobs
    Or whether these people genuinely haven’t heard the term to have seen ones back end.
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    I've genuinely never heard it before in my life, and has absolutely no clue what it meant until I Googled it, and found out it was a Northern colloquialism.

    The problem for me was that, instead of explaining it, the OP just repeated it replacing "a**e" with "rear end" which didn't help at all.
    Last edited by Fingerbobs; 09-10-2019 at 11:36 AM.
    • TREVORCOLMAN
    • By TREVORCOLMAN 9th Oct 19, 11:56 AM
    • 955 Posts
    • 311 Thanks
    TREVORCOLMAN
    I hear the phrase quite often and take it to mean that "one is not happy"
    Originally posted by bertiewhite
    I thought that just applied to Bunny?

    I am NOT a mortgage & insurance adviser - or anything to do with finance, that was put on by the new system I dont know why?!
    • Vortigern
    • By Vortigern 9th Oct 19, 2:01 PM
    • 2,818 Posts
    • 1,947 Thanks
    Vortigern
    Op nothing wrong with your English. Its not the queens granted but any natural Brit will understand. Same few faces looking to derail threads rather thwn be helpful. They have nothing better to do than pick holes in posts
    Originally posted by johndavid29c
    Itís*
    Queenís*
    Than*
    Originally posted by Gary_Dexter
    Quod Erat Demonstrandum
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 9th Oct 19, 8:41 PM
    • 4,093 Posts
    • 705 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    I've genuinely never heard it before in my life, and has absolutely no clue what it meant until I Googled it, and found out it was a Northern colloquialism.
    Originally posted by Fingerbobs
    From personal experience I know people here are very very very VERY quick to jump on anyone who dares to ask a question & respond with "WHY DON'T YOU SEARCH".


    At least you're one of those who stuck with that viewpoint & actually did a search instead of waving your arms around demanding attention.


    My wife being from another country, i hear different phrases all the time, even 15+ years in. I just ask what they mean. Usually i can figure out depending on how they're used. I don't start crying over them because i've never heard them before.

    • Ergates
    • By Ergates 9th Oct 19, 9:00 PM
    • 615 Posts
    • 821 Thanks
    Ergates
    I've genuinely never heard it before in my life, and has absolutely no clue what it meant until I Googled it, and found out it was a Northern colloquialism.

    The problem for me was that, instead of explaining it, the OP just repeated it replacing "a**e" with "rear end" which didn't help at all.
    Originally posted by Fingerbobs
    Well, the OP did also include a link to an article that explained the meaning.
    • Eco Miser
    • By Eco Miser 9th Oct 19, 11:53 PM
    • 3,506 Posts
    • 3,285 Thanks
    Eco Miser
    Well, the OP did also include a link to an article that explained the meaning.
    Originally posted by Ergates
    Eventually.

    I'm 'from the north' and had never heard the expression.
    Eco Miser
    Saving money for well over half a century
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 10th Oct 19, 12:57 AM
    • 1,680 Posts
    • 1,893 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    In which part of the country is that?
    Originally posted by Ergates
    Currently Lincs but I work with people from everywhere so location isn't particularly relevant in my case.
    • schiff
    • By schiff 10th Oct 19, 9:21 AM
    • 18,697 Posts
    • 10,094 Thanks
    schiff
    Well I was born in Manchester and have lived all my life in GMR and I've never heard the expression ever. Perhaps having been to grammar school, MGS no less, I've clearly mixed since then with a better class of person.

    I think the whole thing is a bum rap.

    Che?
    • Davy Jones II
    • By Davy Jones II 10th Oct 19, 9:38 AM
    • 197 Posts
    • 397 Thanks
    Davy Jones II
    Eventually.

    I'm 'from the north' and had never heard the expression.
    Originally posted by Eco Miser
    Iím from the North too, and havenít heard it either.

    Iím also sensible enough to know that using a colloquialism without explaining it on a national forum is stupid, despite those desperate to be contrarian and try to support the OP.
    • Flo2108
    • By Flo2108 11th Oct 19, 3:06 AM
    • 31 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Flo2108
    According to the article, "See your !!!!" means "Be annoyed". Apparently it's from Manchester - though I've family from Manchester and I've *never* heard that expression before.

    However, if we we accept the meaning from The Mirror (because The Mirror has never been known to publish falsehoods) it still doesn't make sense in the given context.

    Barclays have, seemingly, withdrawn counter services from post office branches - why does that make them annoyed?
    Originally posted by Ergates
    If you Ďsee your a**eí with someone or something, it means that the someone or something has annoyed you so you donít speak/deal with them anymore.

    Iím from Manchester, itís a fairly common saying. Iíve heard people not from here use it too.
    • JuicyJesus
    • By JuicyJesus 11th Oct 19, 8:30 AM
    • 3,655 Posts
    • 4,161 Thanks
    JuicyJesus
    From personal experience I know people here are very very very VERY quick to jump on anyone who dares to ask a question & respond with "WHY DON'T YOU SEARCH".
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    I always find that obnoxious, because 99/100 it's quicker just to answer the question than to go "why don't you search? I am very smart. I have never known love."

    The only ones that annoy me are the ones where they ask questions about their accounts which only their bank can answer, or where it would make more sense to call the bank first to ask what's up well before coming to MSE with the question.
    urs sinserly,
    ~~joosy jeezus~~
    • Fingerbobs
    • By Fingerbobs 11th Oct 19, 9:19 PM
    • 777 Posts
    • 315 Thanks
    Fingerbobs
    I always find that obnoxious, because 99/100 it's quicker just to answer the question than to go "why don't you search? I am very smart. I have never known love."
    Originally posted by JuicyJesus
    Even more annoying are responses to the question: "How do you do x?"
    with "Why do you want to do x? It would be much better to do y!"

    Grrr!
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