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  • FIRST POST
    Pansy Potter
    Which woodburning stove is the best?
    • #1
    • 18th Jan 12, 12:05 PM
    Which woodburning stove is the best? 18th Jan 12 at 12:05 PM
    I have one woodburning stove and am about to purchase another traditional type design (not modern) about 10kw output. Interested in finding out which ones everbody rates as best and why. I bought my first stove about a year ago, it was very reasonably priced and has worked well so far, there are some expensive models out there and just wondered what everyones opinion is, do they really justify paying a premium price tag? There surely cannot be that much difference, they are hardly high tech???
Page 3
  • zymotik
    I've just written a review of our Charnwood C4 on WhatStove.co.uk because I was so impressed with such a small stove. Thought I may as well chime in here as its in the same vein:

    "My brother recommended and installed this stove for us (Charnwood C4), heowns a log burning stove installation company in Birmingham www.heatash.com He recommended it as it was small and efficient.Even he was surprised by the heat output of this little beauty.

    We have the defra approved version, so it isnít ascontrollable as the standard. It also has the multifuel kit so the fire box iseven smaller than it normally is. This is the only reason Iíve rated it down, otherwise it is really is excellent. It is really small, sodonít expect it to burn all night long on a single load, it just hasnít got thecapacity. But the heat output is much improved over a similar sized stove as itdoesnít have firebricks inside, just an extra steel plate.
    It does heat our 3 bed 1920ís house without cavity walls allon itís own (writing this in November), we are well impressed. Very chuffedwith this stove, although we will be buying a bigger version next year andmoving this one to the front room. Mainly due to it being undersized, so may evenbuy another of the same."
    Ian
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 9th Nov 12, 10:12 PM
    • 15,966 Posts
    • 22,333 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    It does heat our 3 bed 1920ís house without cavity walls allon itís own (writing this in November), we are well impressed. Very chuffedwith this stove, although we will be buying a bigger version next year andmoving this one to the front room. Mainly due to it being undersized, so may evenbuy another of the same."
    Ian
    Originally posted by zymotik
    So it heats your house all on its own but you are are buying another, bigger, stove because it is undersized? Make your mind up.

    Blatant spam. Reported.
    • Skulls
    • By Skulls 10th Nov 12, 1:18 AM
    • 361 Posts
    • 2,413 Thanks
    Skulls
    This week I removed my flat-top Villager A series wood burner (16kW) and replaced it with a Burley Hollywell 5kW wood burning stove. It's the best move I think I've ever done, in an earlier post I did say that the Villager was good and it is, it's just this Burley is newer and much more economical, according to the spec 89% efficient. I have also installed a cold air feed, although not needed as the fire is only 5kW, but it makes the fire more efficient and I can vouch for this, on a normal fire, if you open your vents, the air going in is already heated and being replaced by cold air from outside.. I have never seen another wood burner that you can connect a cold air supply to, there must be some but just not seen any.

    Using the Aldi Eco-logs I'm getting the lounge up to around 24 degrees using one log every 1.5-2 hours. I'm well impressed with the economy and output of this fire. When I get a chance I will post some images. The flame pattern is hypnotic, the first night I sat in front of it for quite some time with a glass or three of wine just watching the flames!

    My house is 200 years old next year and the walls are all 2ft thick. The lounge is roughly 110 cubic metres with a single glazed window light at the highest point in the ceiling, soon to be replaced.

    I would highly recommend the Burley Hollywell wood burner.
    Last edited by Skulls; 10-11-2012 at 1:47 AM.
    • hethmar
    • By hethmar 13th Nov 12, 2:30 PM
    • 10,399 Posts
    • 9,828 Thanks
    hethmar
    zymotik - you arent allowed to advertise on here
  • Pansy Potter
    Woodmiser - save 33% of Firewood Costs ??????
    I know it is a bit off my original posting about which is the best woodburner, but it is connected with the subject of efficiency.

    I have just come across this product "Woodmiser" and have purchased one. At about £10 I thought it worth a shot if it does as it says and according to the website and packaging it has been tested and verified by Cambridge University.

    Early days yet, tried it for the first time last night and it did seem to get the wood a hot glowing ember base much faster than usual. Has anyone else tried it? Their website is at http://www.woodmiser.co.uk.

    And before anyone says it this is not spam!
    I have no connections or interests whatsoever with this company. If it works it just seems like something very worthwhile to let fellow woodburners know about.
  • Roebuck
    Would I be right in thinking this is just a bit of wire wool?

    Surely just a couple of inches of ash would provide decent enough insulation for the fire bed?
    • alleycat`
    • By alleycat` 14th Nov 12, 9:42 AM
    • 1,777 Posts
    • 1,535 Thanks
    alleycat`
    Well the document talks a lot of marketing speak.
    How the "fibres" are manufactured, well frankly, i don't care about that :-)

    It doesn't supply any links to any of the actual trials conducted by the universities.
    Nor does it talk about the methodology the trials used, so it isn't even possible to try replicate them yourself.

    I'm also puzzled about the temperatures quoted.
    Nobody runs a stove at 750C as it'd be knackered very quickly.

    It might work perfectly but I'm always suspicious of these next great energy saving inventions.
  • Pansy Potter
    Would I be right in thinking this is just a bit of wire wool?

    Surely just a couple of inches of ash would provide decent enough insulation for the fire bed?
    Originally posted by Roebuck
    Yes you are right, this is what it looks like but it is supposed to be the composition of the metals (alloys?) contained therein which makes the difference. I do have an ash bed and but the stove really starts to kick out once it has a bed of embers established which can take a few logs. What I think on first use is that this actually happened much quicker than usual due to the presence the metal fibres. Just wondered if anyone else has tried it the product. I get the feeling you 'experts' are very sceptical!!
    • alleycat`
    • By alleycat` 14th Nov 12, 4:19 PM
    • 1,777 Posts
    • 1,535 Thanks
    alleycat`
    I get the feeling you 'experts' are very sceptical!!
    Originally posted by Pansy Potter
    Not an expert by any means.
    But yes i am naturally sceptical, generally, and especially of things that make big claims
    • Greenfires
    • By Greenfires 14th Nov 12, 4:38 PM
    • 628 Posts
    • 535 Thanks
    Greenfires
    I'm not a physicist or any other kind of scientist - but to the best of my knowledge, a certain amount of fuel will contain a certain amount of energy. I'd have thought then, that if you burn 33% less fuel, you are releasing 33% less energy (heat) as a result?
  • Williwoodburner
    Put me down as............doubtful.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 14th Nov 12, 6:22 PM
    • 3,618 Posts
    • 3,419 Thanks
    muckybutt
    Smells very much like bovine excrement to me !

    Ive seen and read about it before and still think the same about it now.
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
  • dogbeard
    For a nice traditional looking stove try a hunter
    Clearview used to be the market leader because of the clever airwash system nowadays however almost all british stoves have this system and are far better priced, for a nice traditional looking stove try a hunter we got ours from thestoveandcookercentre.co.uk and found them very helpful and impartial.
    • reeac
    • By reeac 8th May 13, 7:23 AM
    • 1,329 Posts
    • 533 Thanks
    reeac
    Hi there,

    The size of our living room & dinning (where the fireplace sits) is 8.8 long and 3.33 wide.

    We were wondering if a 5kw wood burner be sufficient?

    Ideally we would like a 8kw (Clearview Vision 500) but been told from the Hetas engineer that it will involve having did up the walls for a ventilation vent (5") for more air/oxygen to circulate in the room for the stove to be more efficient...

    As we are trying to minimise use of LPG bottled cylinder for our main source of CH & DWH, would a 5kw Clearview Pioneer 400 (5kw) be sufficient to heat up the downstairs?

    We are based in Berkshire.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by tee-bee
    We have a Clearview Pioneer 400 set at one end of a lounge plus dining room which total about 12m. by 5m. [average] . The heat output is adequate but temperature distribution around the rooms is uneven. We've had the stove since 1997 and find its performance to be excellent - easy to light and rapid heating up due to the very controllable draft. We had it installed when the bungalow was built so we have the pukkah pumice block chimney rather than a liner and an underfloor draught. The stove is intended as a back up in case electricity fails and oil c.h. won't work so we don't use it very often
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 8th May 13, 8:48 AM
    • 31,008 Posts
    • 79,473 Thanks
    Mojisola
    We have a Clearview Pioneer 400 set at one end of a lounge plus dining room which total about 12m. by 5m. [average] .

    The stove is intended as a back up in case electricity fails and oil c.h. won't work so we don't use it very often
    Originally posted by reeac
    We've got the Pioneer Oven. We put it in as part of a house revamp, also thinking it would be a back up if gas or electricity were out but it is so easy to use and makes the room so comfortable, we have it on a lot. Being able to slow cook your dinner while the house is kept snug is an added bonus.
    • Skulls
    • By Skulls 9th May 13, 7:47 AM
    • 361 Posts
    • 2,413 Thanks
    Skulls
    Just an update on my Burley Holywell. Bought a 1000kg of heatlogs back in November and I'm finally down to my last 2 logs(2.5kg) So I've had a warm house for just over 5 months for a total cost of £290. I've only emptied the ashes 5 times in all of that time and this is the only form of heating I have in the house.
    • bxboards
    • By bxboards 10th May 13, 2:49 PM
    • 1,688 Posts
    • 1,343 Thanks
    bxboards
    Just an update on my Burley Holywell. Bought a 1000kg of heatlogs back in November and I'm finally down to my last 2 logs(2.5kg) So I've had a warm house for just over 5 months for a total cost of £290. I've only emptied the ashes 5 times in all of that time and this is the only form of heating I have in the house.
    Originally posted by Skulls
    Thanks for the post - which brand of heatlogs did you use? There seem to be several variations, and a fair spread pricewise once delivery is taken into account.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 10th May 13, 3:39 PM
    • 15,966 Posts
    • 22,333 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    Just an update on my Burley Holywell. Bought a 1000kg of heatlogs back in November and I'm finally down to my last 2 logs(2.5kg) So I've had a warm house for just over 5 months for a total cost of £290. I've only emptied the ashes 5 times in all of that time and this is the only form of heating I have in the house.
    Originally posted by Skulls
    By my reckoning you must have used 4800-5000 kwh worth of heat logs.

    The average 3 bedroom house uses 25000 kwh per year to heat (source.) Heating the same house (including water) to the same level using heat logs would cost £1450. The same energy using mains gas would have cost around £1150 depending on the tariff.
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    .
    Last edited by Gloomendoom; 10-05-2013 at 3:44 PM.
    • Skulls
    • By Skulls 12th May 13, 7:48 AM
    • 361 Posts
    • 2,413 Thanks
    Skulls
    I used the UK Heatlogs.

    I'm surprised I've only used one fifth of the average family home! My house is a 2 bedroom bungalow type house, 200 years old this August.

    I'm going to get a few bags of normal logs to keep me going through the warmer months. For next winter I'll most probably try some of Greenfires heat logs.

    I may even put a chimney lining in during the summer.

    Forgot to say no gas available.

    By the way Gloomendoom, your source of heating use also say a 3 bed bungalow uses less electric than a one bedroom bungalow???
    Last edited by Skulls; 12-05-2013 at 7:55 AM.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 12th May 13, 1:38 PM
    • 15,966 Posts
    • 22,333 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    I used the UK Heatlogs.

    I'm surprised I've only used one fifth of the average family home! My house is a 2 bedroom bungalow type house, 200 years old this August.

    I'm going to get a few bags of normal logs to keep me going through the warmer months. For next winter I'll most probably try some of Greenfires heat logs.

    I may even put a chimney lining in during the summer.

    Forgot to say no gas available.

    By the way Gloomendoom, your source of heating use also say a 3 bed bungalow uses less electric than a one bedroom bungalow???
    Originally posted by Skulls
    I know. Daft isn't it.

    We live in a gas heated 3 bed semi built 250-300 years ago and use far less (gas) to heat the place than those average figures suggest is necessary. I think it all comes down to level of heat you find comfortable. We are happy to wear sweaters indoors whereas I know people who only regard a house as warm enough if they can lounge around in shorts and tee shirts.

    I was actually quite impressed by the cost of the heat logs compared to gas. The difference was a lot less than I was expecting.
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