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  • FIRST POST
    Pansy Potter
    Which woodburning stove is the best?
    • #1
    • 18th Jan 12, 12:05 PM
    Which woodburning stove is the best? 18th Jan 12 at 12:05 PM
    I have one woodburning stove and am about to purchase another traditional type design (not modern) about 10kw output. Interested in finding out which ones everbody rates as best and why. I bought my first stove about a year ago, it was very reasonably priced and has worked well so far, there are some expensive models out there and just wondered what everyones opinion is, do they really justify paying a premium price tag? There surely cannot be that much difference, they are hardly high tech???
Page 2
  • tee-bee
    Hi all,

    We're looking to convert our existing fireplace to have a wood burner stove installed.

    We had a certified Hetas engineer visit and have quoted an install charge of GBP 1K++.

    I'm kinda puzzled, as our existing fireplace is still functional (1968 build)..

    Can anyone give a ballpark figure our recommend a reputable installer in Berkshire? We're looking for a 5-7kw cast iron stove.

    Thanks
  • verydeeppockets
    For the 1000 that would presumably involve lining and insulating your existing flue, and fitting the stove. It's about what I was quoted near Manchester. It's not rocket science to do yourself, but you obviously need that essential bit of Hetas-headed notepaper when you come to sell. Or for the insurance when your house burns down
    The liner is stainless steel - there are two 'qualities' available, and I'd always recommend going for the better quality from speaking to sweeps who've seen the cheaper option break down and split over time. About half your quote would be for a liner I'm guessing.
    Brand-wise, stay british or at least european - you'll be able to get spares for starters. Clearview do get one heck of a lot of positive reviews - that can't be a bad thing! If you can, view, poke and prod before you buy - we saw some very poor welding and paint on a couple of supposedly great brands. Note some ebay chinese junk isn't CE marked, so I doubt hetas would install it anyway.
    A sweep is the man to ask - both for stove brands and decent installers.
    Don't know if I'm allowed to suggest other forums, but greenbuildingforum and navitron both have loads of stove users - reading it all gives you an idea of what's hot and what's not.
    Bu-dum-tish (sorry).
    We have two - an Esse inset 5kw that's pretty well built and works ok, but only takes 'ickle logs and takes a while to heat the room up (5m x 4m) probably because it's inset.
    And a german-designed but bulgarian-built boiler stove that takes near-2 foot long logs and runs the rads and hot water. And brings the kitchen it's sited in to a toasty 28 degrees.
    Also I'd highly recommend a moisture meter - under a tenner on ebay - to check supposedly seasoned logs on delivery if you buy 'em in - split one and measure inside - over 20% is a no-go and 15% is ideal. Gives you an idea of what you're buying and who to trust!
    And a flue thermometer gives you much needed info on how well the fire is burning and how you need to control the airflow.
    Ignoring the setup costs, the feeling of 'free' heating is very enjoyable.
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 21st Jan 12, 3:36 PM
    • 5,287 Posts
    • 6,675 Thanks
    A. Badger
    Just a word about the preceding post. It's not strictly true that you need any involvement at all from HETAS. You can self-install or get someone else to do it and pay to have the job signed-off by the local building inspector. I agree with the rest of the post though.
  • tee-bee
    And a german-designed but bulgarian-built boiler stove that takes near-2 foot long logs and runs the rads and hot water. And brings the kitchen it's sited in to a toasty 28 degrees.
    Originally posted by verydeeppockets
    This particular one sounds interesting, would this be an extra cost for installation? was it all done by a HETAS expert or did it require another Gas safe engineer?

    Thanks
  • fin7
    Like a few have said, it boils down to personal choice. When I was looking for a stove i started looking on the net then went to a stove shop, after drooling over quiet a few I chose this one.........

    http://www.broseleyfires.com/Multifuel-Stoves/Serrano-5_Multifuel-Stove.html

    I was going to have a builder instal it, he told me he had installed loads, after reading about stoves on the net it became obvious he didn't have a clue what he was on about, he knew less than me and that was worrying to say the least! The final straw came when he said he'd use a still saw to cut the opening ( can you imagine the mess!!!!) then to cap it all he said stoves don't need signing off!!!! So I got a hetas fitter and can't fault his work, we sit with it on nicely toasting!!! He also recommended we get a carbon monoxide monitor.

    I know of a few around here that have been done by builders and havent been signed off. I showed the hetas fitter a picture of a fire belonging to someone I know, he was horrified, he even offered to go and check it out for free, she said shes happy with it and doesn't believe you have to have them signed off. Its a really frightening installation!

    fin
    • Swipe
    • By Swipe 23rd Jan 12, 10:46 AM
    • 2,254 Posts
    • 1,192 Thanks
    Swipe
    He also recommended we get a carbon monoxide monitor.
    Originally posted by fin7
    I hope this wasn't a recent installation as the regulations now require a CO alarm to be fitted for it to be signed off.
  • tee-bee
    Size of wood burner stove
    Hi there,

    The size of our living room & dinning (where the fireplace sits) is 8.8 long and 3.33 wide.

    We were wondering if a 5kw wood burner be sufficient?

    Ideally we would like a 8kw (Clearview Vision 500) but been told from the Hetas engineer that it will involve having did up the walls for a ventilation vent (5") for more air/oxygen to circulate in the room for the stove to be more efficient...

    As we are trying to minimise use of LPG bottled cylinder for our main source of CH & DWH, would a 5kw Clearview Pioneer 400 (5kw) be sufficient to heat up the downstairs?

    We are based in Berkshire.

    Thanks
    • smcqis
    • By smcqis 23rd Jan 12, 2:12 PM
    • 807 Posts
    • 243 Thanks
    smcqis
    is that metres or feet?
    • bobthedambuilder
    • By bobthedambuilder 23rd Jan 12, 2:30 PM
    • 474 Posts
    • 367 Thanks
    bobthedambuilder
    The size of our living room & dinning (where the fireplace sits) is 8.8 long and 3.33 wide.

    We were wondering if a 5kw wood burner be sufficient?
    Originally posted by tee-bee
    There are lots of variables in determining what size of stove you require for any particular location (type of building, size of windows, internal/external walls etc.).

    I've found this calculator very useful to determine the heat requirements of any room http://www.heatandplumb.com/radCalcs.html .

    Don't oversize a Clearview (or indeed any other) stove - it should work hot to get maximum efficiency.

    If you need additional ventilation, you don't need to dig up the floor - an air brick just above floor level behind the stove is fine (assuming the stove is in front of an external wall!). That's not a massive job.
    A bank is a place that will lend you money if you can prove you don't need it.
  • tee-bee
    Size of wood burner stove
    is that metres or feet?
    Originally posted by smcqis
    Oops, apologises

    8.8 meters x 3.4 meters (width).

    Height is about 2.4 meters
    • bobthedambuilder
    • By bobthedambuilder 23rd Jan 12, 2:36 PM
    • 474 Posts
    • 367 Thanks
    bobthedambuilder
    is that metres or feet?
    Originally posted by smcqis
    Well it wouldn't be a living room 3.33 feet wide, would it?
    A bank is a place that will lend you money if you can prove you don't need it.
  • tee-bee
    If you need additional ventilation, you don't need to dig up the floor - an air brick just above floor level behind the stove is fine (assuming the stove is in front of an external wall!). That's not a massive job.
    Originally posted by bobthedambuilder
    Unfortunately not, (1968 house build) our fire place is not located in front of an external wall....

    Would love to hear from ppl who own 5kW stoves as to whether it is sufficient for a 3 bed semi-D...
  • fin7
    I hope this wasn't a recent installation as the regulations now require a CO alarm to be fitted for it to be signed off.
    Originally posted by Swipe
    No, I was told about needing a co alarm when he first came to look at the job

    fin
  • highrisklowreturn
    That stove will easily heat the space provided, trust me. I live in a victorian mid terrace with no neighbours and poor insulation. I have had a 6kw Stanley Oisin stove for 3 months and the heat is lovely. In front of the fire is comfortable after 30 minutes of housecoal (longer for smokeless as it takes longer to get a large amount of it ignited) and after an hour the other side of the room, where the downstairs backroom would've been before the partition wall was removed, is nice and warm. The living room can get up to 33c 2.8 mtrs in front of the fire to maybe 28 at the other end of the room where I have my computer, but usually reaches a cosy temperature of 24/21 in front of the fire and away from it. The stove also raises the temperature in the house by maybe 2 or 3 degrees more - I never open the doors when running it.

    You could in my view get away with a 6kw - even a 5kw - but I have no doubt a 7 or 8kw would easily toast up your living room and surrounding areas.

    Btw if you haven't bought your stove yet don't believe the propaganda against cheaper brands; mine cost 370 and is perfect for my needs.
    • Swipe
    • By Swipe 23rd Jan 12, 7:54 PM
    • 2,254 Posts
    • 1,192 Thanks
    Swipe
    A 5.5KW stove will be fine for a semi. If it were for a detached bungalow with the chimney on an external wall I'd be tempted to go for a 7 or 8KW.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 26th Jan 12, 10:56 PM
    • 3,598 Posts
    • 2,312 Thanks
    Ectophile
    Unfortunately not, (1968 house build) our fire place is not located in front of an external wall....

    Would love to hear from ppl who own 5kW stoves as to whether it is sufficient for a 3 bed semi-D...
    Originally posted by tee-bee
    I have a 1968 3-bed semi. A 5kW stove easily heats the living room and dining room. When things get warm enough, I open the door to the stairs and warm the rest of the house as well.

    I wouldn't rely on it to heat the whole house, but it should heat the downstairs without any problems.

    That assumes that you have decent insulation, not draughty single-glazed windows.
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 28th Jan 12, 12:57 PM
    • 6,312 Posts
    • 30,275 Thanks
    pineapple
    I've got an Esse Montrose stove which is out of production. I can still get parts from Esse through. It's small but so is the house. I think its 5.5 kw maximum. Enough for my 2 bed cottage.
    Rather unhelpfully I can't remember the make of one in a previous house which 'kept in' better.
    This one will do a good 3 days continuous though - before it needs a thorough clean out.
    If I was starting from scratch I would have one with a back boiler. Also one with a fraction more area on the top (for pans).

    I'm doing an experiment at the mo to find which is cheaper - gas ch or solid fuel. I think gas is. An 8 bag of Excel will only last 3 days if on continuously - running hot in the evening and just turning over the rest of the time. So ground floor day time temperature around 16/17 degrees. Around 20 in the evening.
    The only trouble is I don't feel warm without that fireplace heat source.
    Last edited by pineapple; 28-01-2012 at 1:17 PM.
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 28th Jan 12, 11:10 PM
    • 5,287 Posts
    • 6,675 Thanks
    A. Badger
    Nice stoves Esse - shame they stopped makiing the wonderful Dragon model and went al minimalist on us!

    And I agree, mains gas (if you have it) is probably the cheapest energy but I'm with pineapple - I never feel properly warm in winter without a real fire!
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 28th Jan 12, 11:21 PM
    • 2,241 Posts
    • 5,954 Thanks
    Loanranger
    We've had a Rofer and Rodi woodburning stove for 13 years. Very happy with it. They are a Spanish company but operate in UK from Skipton.
    I agree about the wood being well dried out. If you burn newly cut logs or ones that have got wet you'll get a lot of smoke in the room and it'll also mark any brickwork around the fireplace.
    • bobthedambuilder
    • By bobthedambuilder 29th Jan 12, 10:12 AM
    • 474 Posts
    • 367 Thanks
    bobthedambuilder
    We've had a Rofer and Rodi woodburning stove for 13 years. Very happy with it. They are a Spanish company but operate in UK from Skipton.
    I agree about the wood being well dried out. If you burn newly cut logs or ones that have got wet you'll get a lot of smoke in the room and it'll also mark any brickwork around the fireplace.
    Originally posted by Loanranger
    You shouldn't be getting smoke or discolouration in your room if the stove and flue are properly sealed and airtight - unless you customarily leave the stove door open I suppose.
    A bank is a place that will lend you money if you can prove you don't need it.
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