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  • FIRST POST
    • Penelope Penguin
    • By Penelope Penguin 24th Apr 10, 7:57 PM
    • 17,087Posts
    • 132,754Thanks
    Penelope Penguin
    Lots more Sneaky Ways to save the pennies
    • #1
    • 24th Apr 10, 7:57 PM
    Lots more Sneaky Ways to save the pennies 24th Apr 10 at 7:57 PM
    Official MSE Insert:

    Thanks to Penlope Penguin for starting this legendary thread, which includes everything from growing your own veg to washing & reusing plastic bags.
    Scroll down for tons more tips.

    If you havenít already,
    join the forum.

    Back to the original post...

    The original Sneaky Ways thread is now very long so time for another

    My Sneaky Way - always ask yourself if you really need a non-essential item, and even if you do, wait a week to see if you still need it This has saved DH and I loads

    What are your ways of sneakily saving pennies that your family doesn't notice? I challenge you all to come up with a brand new Sneaky Way that isn;t on the original thread

    Penny. x

    If you havenít already, join the forum to reply! Thanks to Penelope Penguin for posting the tip originally.
    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Rhiannon; 14-05-2019 at 9:52 AM.
    Sheep, pigs, hens and bees on our Teesdale smallholding
Page 4
    • septemberblues
    • By septemberblues 6th May 10, 3:17 PM
    • 825 Posts
    • 3,456 Thanks
    septemberblues
    I dont have any rhubarb growing yet, but when i do what do you do with the leaves?
    Originally posted by lauren_1
    I think they are poisoness
    KEEP CALM AND keep taking the tablets
  • JayJay14
    I've boiled up my rhubarb leaves in some water and put the strained result in a spray bottle - Blackfly deterant for my broad beans.
    • stilernin
    • By stilernin 6th May 10, 6:13 PM
    • 1,217 Posts
    • 1,615 Thanks
    stilernin
    Rhubarb leaves? - I used to use them to cover emerging potatoes if a frost was forecast. Next morning just chuck 'em onto the compost heap.
    • bubbs
    • By bubbs 6th May 10, 7:59 PM
    • 55,489 Posts
    • 642,570 Thanks
    bubbs
    You are not supposed to compost rhubarb leaves as previous poster said they are poisonus(sp)
    • stilernin
    • By stilernin 6th May 10, 8:19 PM
    • 1,217 Posts
    • 1,615 Thanks
    stilernin
    I have composted them for the past 40 years and am still here.

    Have just 'googled' and found this.....

    Can I compost my rhubarb leaves

    Many folks have been concerned about adding rhubarb leaves to their compost piles. If the leaves are poisonous, they must be bad for compost as well, since rhubarb stalks contain a high concentration of oxalic acid which slightly toxic. What actually occurs when rhubarb is added to a compost pile is that the oxalic acid is decomposed and pH balanced rather quickly. People do not eat compost piles as a rule anyway, and even if a child were to eat compost dirt, there would be problems other than residuals from the decomposing rhubarb stalks. Experience has also shown that the level of acid does not inhibit the microbial action of composting. Compost piles which were nearly all rhubarb leaves and stalks have decomposed very nicely and the compost has behaved like ordinary compost and no inhibition of plant growth was noticed from the compost. Note that some items are a problem for composting including: eucalyptus leaves and bark, omnivore (cat and dog) pet faeces, meat scraps, and treated wood.
  • sock-knitter
    Good luck, you'll love it! It's like getting new clothes for free. Let us know how it goes...
    Originally posted by zoelb
    well i got the dylon dye, only 2.99 and chucked it in washing machine, with a faded, pair of old blue jeans, which also had an oil stain on, turned on machine,
    couple hours later, brand new black jeans
    zoelb, your a star, those jeans were destined for the bin, now i cant wait to wear them, thank you again for such a wonderful tip
    loves to knit and crochet for others
    • Apricot
    • By Apricot 6th May 10, 8:53 PM
    • 2,339 Posts
    • 7,486 Thanks
    Apricot
    Wrap an elastic band around the pump part of handwash - stops people pressing it down too much and wasting it.
    DD July 2011


    Aug 13 £4235.19 £2550.00
  • BitterAndTwisted
    I'd be too ashamed to do that: my hand-wash pump dispenser is filled with Asda's 18 pence a litre foam-bath. And it's diluted 50/50 with water. I certainly wouldn't hesitate if I was using top-quality stuff, that's for sure. Canny Princesleah
    • septemberblues
    • By septemberblues 7th May 10, 10:22 AM
    • 825 Posts
    • 3,456 Thanks
    septemberblues
    Wrap an elastic band around the pump part of handwash - stops people pressing it down too much and wasting it.
    Originally posted by princessleah_
    Haha, that is a great idea especially if it is diluted/cheap already!
    KEEP CALM AND keep taking the tablets
    • Winchelsea
    • By Winchelsea 7th May 10, 10:52 AM
    • 691 Posts
    • 9,316 Thanks
    Winchelsea
    As I posted a couple of days ago, rhubarb leaves are supposed to be a good mordant (fixative) when dyeing clothes with veg dyes, e.g. beetroot, red cabbage, onions etc.
    Keeping three cats, the car and myself on a small budget, and enjoying life while we're at it!
  • zoelb
    well i got the dylon dye, only 2.99 and chucked it in washing machine, with a faded, pair of old blue jeans, which also had an oil stain on, turned on machine,
    couple hours later, brand new black jeans
    zoelb, your a star, those jeans were destined for the bin, now i cant wait to wear them, thank you again for such a wonderful tip
    Originally posted by sock-knitter
    Ooh £2.99 is a good price - where did you buy it? I need to do some more dying!! I'm having withdrawal symptoms!

    Glad they came out well, I knew they would ... you will do it all the time now I bet
    • curlytop12
    • By curlytop12 7th May 10, 3:29 PM
    • 1,101 Posts
    • 1,204 Thanks
    curlytop12
    £2.99 is great! £5 at hobby craft,not seen it for sale anywhere else.(thats the one you can put in the washing machine btw)
  • sock-knitter
    hi gem, just pm'ed you, for everyone else i got the machine dye from morrisons
    sk
    loves to knit and crochet for others
    • babyshoes
    • By babyshoes 7th May 10, 5:51 PM
    • 1,709 Posts
    • 3,325 Thanks
    babyshoes
    Love the dye tip, pity my jeans tend to wear a hole in the crotch before they fade enough to dye!!!
    Trust me - I'm NOT a doctor!
    • squiggles
    • By squiggles 7th May 10, 6:34 PM
    • 1,372 Posts
    • 2,574 Thanks
    squiggles
    £2.99 is great! £5 at hobby craft,not seen it for sale anywhere else.(thats the one you can put in the washing machine btw)
    Originally posted by gem68
    I've saw it in Lloyds the chemist but sorry i dont recall the price but thaught i would mention it anyway as it would give you another option of where to purchase it.
    • Uniscots97
    • By Uniscots97 7th May 10, 7:55 PM
    • 6,422 Posts
    • 23,816 Thanks
    Uniscots97
    Here's some ideas I've put into practise recently:-

    - using old envelopes for shopping lists
    - leaving my oven door open after cooking to help heat the room
    - when making 2 cups of tea using 1 tea bag (I like my tea pretty weak anyway)
    - if I find tiny holes in t-shirts caused by them snagging on zips on other items of clothing I'll darn them and cover over with beads or sequins and arrange in a pattern (started this using a small bead necklace found at a jumble sale for 10p). This also works for updating clothes too.
    - in the colder weather I'll wear my summer vest tops with complimentary coloured long sleeved tops, saves buying lots of clothes and keeps you warm.
    - when I snapped the laces on my deck shoes I used the ribbon out of my tops I keep and tied them together to make pretty laces.
    CC2 = £8687.86 (£10000 )CC1 = £0 (£9983 ); Reusing shopping bags savings =£5.80 vs spent £1.05.Wine is like opera. You can enjoy it even if you don't understand it and too much can give you a headache the next day J
  • ceridwen
    As I posted a couple of days ago, rhubarb leaves are supposed to be a good mordant (fixative) when dyeing clothes with veg dyes, e.g. beetroot, red cabbage, onions etc.
    Originally posted by Winchelsea
    Thanks for that. What is the process one uses to turn those rhubarb leaves into a mordant please?

    I'm guessing its a case of grab a good handful of rhubarb leaves/chop up small and boil up with enough water to cover them for, say, 10 minutes. Drain off the water and keep (ie thats the mordant)? Would that sound right?

    Once the mordant is made - then how does one actually use it please? Again - I'm guessing - but I assume one would dye the clothes with vegetables to required colour/let them dry and then just swirl them round in say a small trug of mordant (diluted say 10:1 with water). Would that sound right for that?

    EDIT: Now googling - and the first thing I found was very vague. The only practical how-to was its 1lb of rhubarb leaves and they have to be simmered for an hour and one must do it outdoors......
    Last edited by ceridwen; 08-05-2010 at 8:12 AM.
    • cyclingyorkie
    • By cyclingyorkie 8th May 10, 8:07 AM
    • 4,198 Posts
    • 59,581 Thanks
    cyclingyorkie
    when my DD's were throwing out their exfoliating gloves I grabbed them - they're fantastic for cleaning the bath with!
    • lauren_1
    • By lauren_1 8th May 10, 8:45 AM
    • 1,984 Posts
    • 5,256 Thanks
    lauren_1
    For those who use washable nappies/washable sanitary wear, you can make the pads/liners so much easier and cheaper than what they are sold for, just cut up a fleece blanket in to sanitary towel sized shaped, voila...a nappy liner or panty liner

    Cut the same shape from a single layer of towelling, sew to liner.....voila.....booster pad for nappies OR a pad/panty liner

    You can make your own wipes too! cut make the above square *the toweling back works best. keep in a watertight pot, i found the tupperwear oyster a ideal size, wet the wipes with mix of cold camomile tea and a tea spoon of baby wash.
    • Winchelsea
    • By Winchelsea 9th May 10, 3:12 PM
    • 691 Posts
    • 9,316 Thanks
    Winchelsea
    ceridwen

    About the rhubarb leaves as mordant, I don't really know the answer, but your ideas sound good to me.

    I was at the Eden Project last spring, and a woman was knitting bunting from lovely shades of wool. When I spoke to her she told me she spins and dyes all her own yarn, using vegetable dyes.

    I asked her how she fixed the colours and she told me about rhubarb leaves. She made it sound very simple, i.e. on the lines of "throw them in and see what happens"!
    Keeping three cats, the car and myself on a small budget, and enjoying life while we're at it!
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