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  • FIRST POST
    • Spir4
    • By Spir4 26th May 19, 10:39 PM
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    Spir4
    What are these types of houses called
    • #1
    • 26th May 19, 10:39 PM
    What are these types of houses called 26th May 19 at 10:39 PM
    Hi,

    See attached picture. I was just wondering what these kind of houses / flats are called.
    So to clarify: the left hand door is a direct entrance to the bottom left living unit, the right hand door to the bottom right unit. The middle door has a staircase behind it, and on top of the staircase is the entrance to the top left living unit, and the top right living unit.



    Thanks
Page 1
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 26th May 19, 10:42 PM
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    davidmcn
    • #2
    • 26th May 19, 10:42 PM
    • #2
    • 26th May 19, 10:42 PM
    It might depend in which part of the world it is. In Scotland we would call ground floor flats with their own front door "main door flats", but there isn't a special name for a block which happens to include them.
    • Housebuy12345
    • By Housebuy12345 26th May 19, 11:13 PM
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    Housebuy12345
    • #3
    • 26th May 19, 11:13 PM
    • #3
    • 26th May 19, 11:13 PM
    Not sure. But why are you asking?
    • googler
    • By googler 26th May 19, 11:38 PM
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    googler
    • #4
    • 26th May 19, 11:38 PM
    • #4
    • 26th May 19, 11:38 PM
    In my part of Scotland, this is referred to as a Quarter Villa.

    A Main Door Flat is typically the one or two flats within a tenement block on the ground floor, with their own front door.
    • zagubov
    • By zagubov 27th May 19, 12:27 AM
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    zagubov
    • #5
    • 27th May 19, 12:27 AM
    • #5
    • 27th May 19, 12:27 AM
    Are they purpose-built or conversions of semi-detached houses. Conversions of existing houses are very much a major type of home here in London. Not needed so much in the rest of the UK I think, due to less land pressure.
    There is no honour to be had in not knowing a thing that can be known - Danny Baker
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 27th May 19, 6:00 AM
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    Doozergirl
    • #6
    • 27th May 19, 6:00 AM
    • #6
    • 27th May 19, 6:00 AM
    That's what I'd call maisonettes.

    Flats with their own private front doors.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 27-05-2019 at 6:03 AM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 27th May 19, 6:08 AM
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    AnotherJoe
    • #7
    • 27th May 19, 6:08 AM
    • #7
    • 27th May 19, 6:08 AM
    Ditto Doozergirl, maisonettes.
    Please dont criticise my spelling. It's excellent. Its my typing that's bad.
    • Splatfoot
    • By Splatfoot 27th May 19, 6:48 AM
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    Splatfoot
    • #8
    • 27th May 19, 6:48 AM
    • #8
    • 27th May 19, 6:48 AM
    A maisonette is an apartment on two floors with its own internal staircase. So I don't think this is a maisonette. It's just a purpose built flat isn't it, with the added bonus of its own entrance.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 27th May 19, 7:24 AM
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    • #9
    • 27th May 19, 7:24 AM
    • #9
    • 27th May 19, 7:24 AM
    A maisonette is an apartment on two floors with its own internal staircase. So I don't think this is a maisonette. It's just a purpose built flat isn't it, with the added bonus of its own entrance.
    Originally posted by Splatfoot
    I lived in one like the OP drawing as a child and it was called a maisonette. It had its own staircase inside - just the bottom floor was a lot smaller than the top floor!

    My aunt lived in one that was fully on two levels but had a communal staircase to get past the downstairs maisonettes, and its own staircase to its own second floor.

    Clear as mud
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 27th May 19, 7:26 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    Maisonettes, as they have their own front doors.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 27th May 19, 7:32 AM
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    AdrianC
    I'd call 'em flats. No more, no less.
    • scottishblondie
    • By scottishblondie 27th May 19, 7:34 AM
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    scottishblondie
    It might depend in which part of the world it is. In Scotland we would call ground floor flats with their own front door "main door flats", but there isn't a special name for a block which happens to include them.
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    I would call that "4 in a block" or "cottage flats". To me a main door flat is the ground floor of a tenement.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 27th May 19, 7:44 AM
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    davidmcn
    I lived in one like the OP drawing as a child and it was called a maisonette. It had its own staircase inside
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Maisonettes, as they have their own front doors.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    This is another regionalism (or nationalism perhaps) - Scottish maisonettes are duplex flats, but the English use it for flats with their own front door.

    I would call that "4 in a block" or "cottage flats". To me a main door flat is the ground floor of a tenement.
    Originally posted by scottishblondie
    4 in a block / cottage flats / quarter villa all suggest to me that every flat has its own private entrance, not like the OP's example where the upper flats have a communal stair. This seems more like a tenement (with main door flats), but fewer upper floors than we would consider standard (and to confuse things further, in Scottish legal jargon a "tenement" is any sort of block of flats, no matter the height or style).
    • Spir4
    • By Spir4 27th May 19, 7:45 AM
    • 23 Posts
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    Spir4
    Thanks for all the replies. I ask this just out of curiosity
    I thought it were maisonettes as well, but then the 2 upper living units do have a communal staircase so maybe just the bottom units are maisonettes and the top units flats?
    Then again, the front door leading to the staircase originally didn't have doorbells, letterboxes, not even a lock. So people, the mailman, ... would just walk in, go up, and then arrive at the actual front door of the upper living unites where the mailbox was, the doorbell, ... So back then I'd say the upper units were maisonettes as well.
    Now however that front door does have a lock, mailboxes, and wireless doorbells. Still maisonettes?
    • Spir4
    • By Spir4 27th May 19, 7:46 AM
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    Spir4
    Oh and it's in Scotland by the way
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 27th May 19, 7:52 AM
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    davidmcn
    Then again, the front door leading to the staircase originally didn't have doorbells, letterboxes, not even a lock.
    Originally posted by Spir4
    Most "traditional" tenements were originally built with open close mouths too - doesn't make the flats "maisonettes" (which, as discussed above, isn't what anybody in Scotland would call them anyway!) or "main door". I'm not aware of any special name for this design, it's just a block of flats. In practice everything works in the same way as a standard 3 or 4 storey tenement.
    Last edited by davidmcn; 27-05-2019 at 12:23 PM.
    • Spir4
    • By Spir4 27th May 19, 8:01 AM
    • 23 Posts
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    Spir4
    Most "traditional" tenements were originally built with open close mouthes too - doesn't make the flats "maisonettes" (which, as discussed above, isn't what anybody in Scotland would call them anyway!) or "main door". I'm not aware of any special name for this design, it's just a block of flats. In practice everything works in the same way as a standard 3 or 4 storey tenement.
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    So it doesn't matter that the bottom units have no communal parts whatsoever, they're flats as well?
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 27th May 19, 8:12 AM
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    davidmcn
    So it doesn't matter that the bottom units have no communal parts whatsoever, they're flats as well?
    Originally posted by Spir4
    They do have communal parts - the outside walls, the roof, any shared service media, any shared private ground etc will all normally be communal among all the flats in the block. Anything with another house above or below you is a flat.
    • jimbog
    • By jimbog 27th May 19, 8:19 AM
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    jimbog
    I would definitely get a survey done. Some of those walls have structurally issues
    Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else.
    • Spir4
    • By Spir4 27th May 19, 8:32 AM
    • 23 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Spir4
    Alright thanks for the replies!
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