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    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 11:09 AM
    • 15Posts
    • 6Thanks
    robertboyd
    Noise Reduction in Terraced House?
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:09 AM
    Noise Reduction in Terraced House? 14th Jun 19 at 11:09 AM
    Hello all,

    I just had a baby recently and really enjoy the pleasure of being a parent. There was tough moments and also the joy of seeing the baby grow up.
    However, I recently received a courteous and kind note from our next door neighbor that baby crying in unsociable hours (1.30 am - 3.30 am) sometimes makes him unable to go back to sleep and hence affects his work the next day (he has to wake up early everyday for work). We live in a terraced house and so the walls between our houses are probably quite thin.

    Although he said that it is not a tremendous disturbance, we still feel very bad for interfering our neighbor, so now we need to find a way to reduce noise. I looked online and found that soundproofing the walls by sticking sound-dampening materials like acoustic foam, or sponge is the most suitable solution for our situation.

    Just before I storm out and purchase a lot of foam/sponge, I would just like to know if any of the members here has tried this before and whether it works or not? Does the foam absorb the sound well? Or doesn't do anything at all? There are mixed reviews about it everywhere I looked
Page 3
    • ruperts
    • By ruperts 15th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    • 2,430 Posts
    • 4,711 Thanks
    ruperts
    Introducing yourself to your neighbours, or dropping them a note is great.

    But why would you inflict your baby on them? Should I introduce my cat to the neighbouring flats, so they can bond with her? Or would that be presumptuous?

    It is a generic baby not a person. It becomes a person once it has a personality. Babies of the same ethnicity look similar and sound similar. Their screaming has evolved to be annoying. Hence I feel for the parents of any baby that cries a lot. But I do not want to have to fake coo over it.

    A significant minority of people either don't like babies, or don't like most babies.
    Originally posted by Fire Fox
    If you were keeping a wild animal such as a cat confined within a flat and it was consequently making so much noise that it was disturbing the neighbours I think your best bet would be to give the cat to some sort of animal charity who could re-house it to a more suitable environment.

    Babies aren't cats though and comparing the two is weird.

    On 2nd thoughts don't take the baby to see the neighbours, you never know how weird some people are, evidently.
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 15th Jun 19, 10:50 AM
    • 2,200 Posts
    • 2,637 Thanks
    need an answer
    So the neighbour came out of the womb as a fully functioning adult?


    We've all been a baby and a small child in the same way that everyone driving a car on a full licence at some time was "that learner driver infront"....

    Have consideration for the guy and his circumstances, but its just a case of giving someone at a different life stage to you a little bit of leeway.

    OP if your still there in 30 years times the chances are he'll be sat in front of his TV with the sound blaring out because he cant hear as well as he used to....Question is will you then ask him to turn it down or just accept that its the next life phase that he's in that you haven't reached yet.

    TBH there are loads of things that can wake any of us up at night,passing cars,even birdsong....

    You cant live in a world without noise.
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    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 15th Jun 19, 11:07 AM
    • 3,436 Posts
    • 5,317 Thanks
    NeilCr
    So the neighbour came out of the womb as a fully functioning adult?


    We've all been a baby and a small child in the same way that everyone driving a car on a full licence at some time was "that learner driver infront"....

    Have consideration for the guy and his circumstances, but its just a case of giving someone at a different life stage to you a little bit of leeway.

    OP if your still there in 30 years times the chances are he'll be sat in front of his TV with the sound blaring out because he cant hear as well as he used to....Question is will you then ask him to turn it down or just accept that its the next life phase that he's in that you haven't reached yet.

    TBH there are loads of things that can wake any of us up at night,passing cars,even birdsong....

    You cant live in a world without noise.
    Originally posted by need an answer
    But we are talking about two hours solid every night between 1.30-3.30. I think it's reasonable to hope for some peace at those hours

    I sleep with my bedroom windows open. The family across the path from me had a baby who cried for hours every night - usually started at midnight. They'd take it to the other bedroom (opposite mine) and open the window. Even across 50 yards the noise was awful. I was lucky. I could shut the window (which was a bit unpleasant on a hot night) but did block out most of the noise.

    I sympathise with the neighbour - if I hadn't been able to shut the window and kill the noise that would have driven me mad

    Add me to the list of those who don't want to meet next door's baby, too!
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 15th Jun 19, 11:12 AM
    • 2,200 Posts
    • 2,637 Thanks
    need an answer
    But we are talking about two hours solid every night between 1.30-3.30. I think it's reasonable to hope for some peace at those hours

    I sleep with my bedroom windows open. The family across the path from me had a baby who cried for hours every night - usually started at midnight. They'd take it to the other bedroom (opposite mine) and open the window. Even across 50 yards the noise was awful. I was lucky. I could shut the window (which was a bit unpleasant on a hot night) but did block out most of the noise.

    I sympathise with the neighbour - if I hadn't been able to shut the window and kill the noise that would have driven me mad

    Add me to the list of those who don't want to meet next door's baby, too!
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    As I said we've all been there.....

    You too I expect cried as a baby...i'd be worried if you didn't.
    You've clearly forgotten that potentially your parents walked the floor with you on occasion,no doubt often in your first year.

    You want peace those hours because it suits you...the shift worker who is awake at night might think differently when they cant sleep during the day.


    Its life.
    Last edited by need an answer; 15-06-2019 at 11:18 AM.
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    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 15th Jun 19, 11:25 AM
    • 3,436 Posts
    • 5,317 Thanks
    NeilCr
    As I said we've all been there.....

    You too I expect cried as a baby...i'd be worried if you didn't.
    You've clearly forgotten that potentially your parents walked the floor with you on occasion.

    You want peace those hours because it suits you...the shift worker who is awake at night might think differently when they cant sleep during the day.


    Its life.
    Originally posted by need an answer

    I didn't cry for two hours every night - nor do/did most babies that I am aware of. My partner has five kids and thirteen grandchildren and none of them did.

    My parents - had they been in this situation would have found a way - like moving around with the baby, as suggested. I suspect that's exactly what the family across the way were doing as it's a semi detached house and they were conscious of the problems the noise was causing to their neighbours.

    It's refreshing to see the OP trying to find a solution and taking account of their neighbours - as opposed to shrugging their shoulders and saying "it's life".
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 15th Jun 19, 12:42 PM
    • 12,335 Posts
    • 16,836 Thanks
    hazyjo
    I once owned a flat that was reasonably quiet for years. However, someone moved in in the flat next door and put a small adopted child that cried very loudly for hours at night in the adjoining room. It was truly terrible torture, and the bawling sounded as if it was in my room. I ended up sleeping in the conservatory (where I could still hear the noise). The room was too small to enable any form of soundproofing to be installed. I moved out quite quickly from that place, and still have nightmares about it.
    Originally posted by Sapphire
    Absolutely with you, it would drive me INSANE. I absolutely hate babies crying and an one of those awful non-maternal women who look at them on planes, public transport, etc and roll my eyes and thinks ARGHH FFS rather than cooing over them and wanting to hold them!

    But did you go next door and ask them to soundproof their house or stop their baby crying? Just trying to say it's the person suffering who should be soundproofing or choosing to move. As hard as that is.

    I had a baby next door once and would go keep in my spare room on really bad nights. Wouldn't have crossed my mind to tell them to do something to keep the noise down.

    Know it seems endless, but they don't cry all night forever. They grow up pretty quick.
    2019 wins: Bottle of Prosecco; Popcorn Shed popcorn; Moisturising 'M&S Time Capsules'; Case of Boost Sport + 30 Just Eat voucher; Battle Proms tickets and hotel; under-eye serum...

    "Should know better." Apparently.
    • markin
    • By markin 15th Jun 19, 1:12 PM
    • 846 Posts
    • 692 Thanks
    markin
    Its going to be a problem for the next 18 years, So yes i would fix it now. I don't see why it should cost more than 200 if you can do it yourself.

    Ideally on a new stud wall or batons, and 2 layers of sound board with over lapping joints.



    Knauf Sound Panel
    https://www.wickes.co.uk/Knauf-Sound-Panel-Tapered-Edge---12-5mm-x-1-2m-x-2-4m/p/224657


    British Gypsum Gyproc SoundBloc
    https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/British-Gypsum-Gyproc-SoundBloc-Tapered-Edge-2400mm-x-1200mm-x-12-5mm/p/865328

    Babys and kids are always a problem unless its a detached house, your neighbour Did choice to buy a terrace.
    Last edited by markin; 15-06-2019 at 1:48 PM.
    • _shel
    • By _shel 15th Jun 19, 4:27 PM
    • 2,355 Posts
    • 4,341 Thanks
    _shel
    So this baby is going to continue to scream for 2 hrs every night once it is 17! Most bizarre.

    Mostly stops within a couple of months.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 15th Jun 19, 4:46 PM
    • 4,890 Posts
    • 8,303 Thanks
    Smodlet
    So this baby is going to continue to scream for 2 hrs every night once it is 17! Most bizarre.

    Mostly stops within a couple of months.
    Originally posted by _shel
    How many 17 year olds have you been around recently?
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • jonnygee2
    • By jonnygee2 15th Jun 19, 4:55 PM
    • 1,520 Posts
    • 1,596 Thanks
    jonnygee2
    Its going to be a problem for the next 18 years
    I'm very far from an expert on children, but I'm still confident that night time crying normally stops earlier than 18 years old.
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 15th Jun 19, 6:08 PM
    • 2,200 Posts
    • 2,637 Thanks
    need an answer
    I didn't cry for two hours every night - nor do/did most babies that I am aware of. My partner has five kids and thirteen grandchildren and none of them did.

    My parents - had they been in this situation would have found a way - like moving around with the baby, as suggested. I suspect that's exactly what the family across the way were doing as it's a semi detached house and they were conscious of the problems the noise was causing to their neighbours.

    It's refreshing to see the OP trying to find a solution and taking account of their neighbours - as opposed to shrugging their shoulders and saying "it's life".
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    so youre not a dad yourself who has bought up his children?

    I'm not sure at what point ive shrugged my shoulders either....
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    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 15th Jun 19, 7:57 PM
    • 3,436 Posts
    • 5,317 Thanks
    NeilCr
    so youre not a dad yourself who has bought up his children?
    Originally posted by need an answer
    Nope. I do have experience of child noise, though!

    And, I am in a relationship with someone who, as I said, has five children and thirteen grandchildren (one of whom lives with her).

    We discussed this thread and she said what some here have said - move round with the child and have awareness of the neighbours if the noise is disturbing them - particularly as it is two hours a night. It's not just "it's life"

    Are you saying this is wrong?
    Last edited by NeilCr; 15-06-2019 at 8:02 PM.
    • markin
    • By markin 16th Jun 19, 2:10 AM
    • 846 Posts
    • 692 Thanks
    markin
    So this baby is going to continue to scream for 2 hrs every night once it is 17! Most bizarre.

    Mostly stops within a couple of months.
    Originally posted by _shel

    No, different noise as he/she grows up, and its a 2 way street, how long until they are telling him to keep the music down at 6pm with the kid trying to get to sleep, Or in 15 years he/she playing music when next door has got a night shift.


    The walls are clearly not that good.
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 16th Jun 19, 8:48 AM
    • 2,200 Posts
    • 2,637 Thanks
    need an answer
    Nope. I do have experience of child noise, though!

    And, I am in a relationship with someone who, as I said, has five children and thirteen grandchildren (one of whom lives with her).

    We discussed this thread and she said what some here have said - move round with the child and have awareness of the neighbours if the noise is disturbing them - particularly as it is two hours a night. It's not just "it's life"

    Are you saying this is wrong?
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    I'm not saying you are wrong...there is always people who will have a different opinion to ones own...and you are entitled to your opinion as am I and anyone else.

    I do believe that if the child is yours you have more appreciation of any noise...I didn't realise this until I had my own,its on e thing having experience,its another level having one.
    Friends always maintain that its easier to change your own childs nappy than someone elses...


    Noise is a very subjective thing and clearly some people suffer more from others noise than other people.The problem here with this neighbour is hes not in control of the noise

    The OP could put soundproofing in to their property.I have some recent experience of this where a friend has installed something against their walls that is around 5cm in thickness and claimes to block out general talking or TV noise ...I would be unsure that even that were able to block out the sound of maybe a crying baby if its something that the other party has tuned into and hears no matter what.

    What would be good for the OP to also establish is does the other neighbour on the other side hear or worry over the noise..thats a good indication if there really might be an issue.

    I get the feeling that this is never going away for the OP...at the moment its baby crying,there will be times where their child is ill I the night and will disturb neighbours.
    There will be times when the recorder years kick in and yes you do unfortunately subject the neighbours to practice sessions ...and then what about the times when youre all out in the garden playing in a paddling pool and having fun....that noise albeit happy can be irritating to the guy next door who just wants to sit in his chair and snooze.

    ...and all that before we've even got to the teenage years.

    If the neighbour really has a problem there is noise abatement departments at the local council...although with respect I really wouldn't think the case would be taken much further than the initial complaint

    Today is fathers day and there will be many enjoying their children,warts and all..there will be others who just wish they were in the position to hear their child cry,whisper or laugh one more time

    Yes I still maintain children are life...I make no apology that we disagree.
    Last edited by need an answer; 16-06-2019 at 8:57 AM.
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    • buel10
    • By buel10 16th Jun 19, 9:42 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    buel10
    I second the suggestion to sort out the baby rather than the wall,
    Originally posted by Smodlet
    I will put absolutely every penny I own on that you do not have children.
    • jamesperrett
    • By jamesperrett 17th Jun 19, 12:49 AM
    • 889 Posts
    • 527 Thanks
    jamesperrett
    Its going to be a problem for the next 18 years, So yes i would fix it now. I don't see why it should cost more than 200 if you can do it yourself.

    Ideally on a new stud wall or batons, and 2 layers of sound board with over lapping joints.



    Knauf Sound Panel
    https://www.wickes.co.uk/Knauf-Sound-Panel-Tapered-Edge---12-5mm-x-1-2m-x-2-4m/p/224657


    British Gypsum Gyproc SoundBloc
    https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/British-Gypsum-Gyproc-SoundBloc-Tapered-Edge-2400mm-x-1200mm-x-12-5mm/p/865328

    Babys and kids are always a problem unless its a detached house, your neighbour Did choice to buy a terrace.
    Originally posted by markin
    And this is where you need someone who knows what they are doing to make sure the details are exactly right. The picture misses out some vital information... The studs can be metal or wood but they must not be attached to the existing party wall. Gyproc's suggestion for good noise reduction is to use 19mm plasterboard plank next to the studs with a layer of 12.5mm acoustic plasterboard on top. For absolute best noise reduction a further layer of 15mm acoustic plasterboard can be used with Green Glue between the layers. Green glue isn't actually an adhesive but it forms a permanently flexible layer that is good at absorbing sound.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 17th Jun 19, 7:49 AM
    • 31,553 Posts
    • 80,895 Thanks
    Mojisola
    I will put absolutely every penny I own on that you do not have children.
    Originally posted by buel10
    It was my suggestion and I do have children.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 17th Jun 19, 8:23 AM
    • 10,149 Posts
    • 35,453 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    I absolutely agree with wandering around with screaming demon, for those two hours. Mostly as a full 120m minutes full lungs screaming is effortful & being cuddled may help. There is all of downstairs. There is also research that says being walked with is the most familiar and soothing sensation a baby knows, so gently shambling up & down may help?

    Depending on how alert you are (!) there may even be a car to go for a drive in. (I'm not advocating grand theft auto just the engine buzz soothed my three into oblivion. Getting them back into the house still out cold was tricky, though.)

    If you can't get the yelling to stop, please see your health visitor/GP. Colic is a known & familiar chore but the hours you mention aren't the traditional ones, so please, get some medical advice if a week of relocating, cuddling & shambling hasn't helped?

    We hung a rug up on the wall to help mop up some of the sound. Heavy, so we ended up playing 'hunt that joist' & fastening in three hooks to hold the broomhandle it was mounted on, but it did mop some noise & meant we had a nice rug later on.

    Your little 'un Will outgrow this. A note thanking the neighbour for their support & tolerance & that you are working on possible remedies should hopefully reassure them that you do know & care & appreciate the racket is a challenge.
    • Out, Vile Jelly
    • By Out, Vile Jelly 17th Jun 19, 9:08 AM
    • 4,492 Posts
    • 15,618 Thanks
    Out, Vile Jelly
    I once lived in a flat with a screaming baby on one side (cot up against the party wall) and a noisy toddler whose mother relentlessly yelled the f word at it on the other. We moved.
    They are an EYESORES!!!!
    • markin
    • By markin 17th Jun 19, 9:12 AM
    • 846 Posts
    • 692 Thanks
    markin
    And this is where you need someone who knows what they are doing to make sure the details are exactly right. The picture misses out some vital information... The studs can be metal or wood but they must not be attached to the existing party wall. Gyproc's suggestion for good noise reduction is to use 19mm plasterboard plank next to the studs with a layer of 12.5mm acoustic plasterboard on top. For absolute best noise reduction a further layer of 15mm acoustic plasterboard can be used with Green Glue between the layers. Green glue isn't actually an adhesive but it forms a permanently flexible layer that is good at absorbing sound.
    Originally posted by jamesperrett

    Green glue starts getting expensive at 22 a tube/plasterboard sheet, i did find cheaper brands.

    I also found a rubber mat, but at 39 for 3m x 1.25m it really starts adding to the cost.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Advanced-Acoustics-Soundproofing-1-25m-thin/dp/B00BSBMFBM/


    32 for a 12 pack of Everbuild-AC50-Acoustic-Sealant.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Everbuild-AC50-Acoustic-Sealant-Adhesive/dp/B006SV7PPS/

    Also resilient bars could be used, or even resilient tape. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Advanced-Acoustics-EPDM-Resilient-Sealant/dp/B00BSAAB1E/



    Last edited by markin; 17-06-2019 at 10:19 AM.
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