Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • bowkett
    • By bowkett 26th Oct 15, 4:19 PM
    • 15Posts
    • 1Thanks
    bowkett
    Advice and recommendations please! CCTV security cameras
    • #1
    • 26th Oct 15, 4:19 PM
    Advice and recommendations please! CCTV security cameras 26th Oct 15 at 4:19 PM
    Hi folks,
    Advice and opinions sought on purchasing cctv or security cameras. Looking for something that is easy to install and record from.
    Thanks folks
Page 1
    • enfield freddy
    • By enfield freddy 26th Oct 15, 4:45 PM
    • 5,920 Posts
    • 3,909 Thanks
    enfield freddy
    • #2
    • 26th Oct 15, 4:45 PM
    • #2
    • 26th Oct 15, 4:45 PM
    a piece of string can be anything from an inch long to several miles long ,please explain what you want better
    • bowkett
    • By bowkett 26th Oct 15, 5:45 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    bowkett
    • #3
    • 26th Oct 15, 5:45 PM
    • #3
    • 26th Oct 15, 5:45 PM
    Er, something to use at home. 24hr recording. Front and back of house. Want something that will record and keep for a few days or so. I have heard there are some wireless ones out there. Some you can view orver the internet etc. No nithing about any so asking for advice and opinions :-)
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 26th Oct 15, 5:48 PM
    • 5,692 Posts
    • 7,184 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    • #4
    • 26th Oct 15, 5:48 PM
    • #4
    • 26th Oct 15, 5:48 PM
    The B word is BUDGET
    Low budget = VGA quality potato cam.
    High budget = 4k recording with 720 steaming and low light capability with motion sensor alert and phone app remote viewing.
    • Delia Cardei
    • By Delia Cardei 27th Oct 15, 9:22 AM
    • 291 Posts
    • 2,140 Thanks
    Delia Cardei
    • #5
    • 27th Oct 15, 9:22 AM
    • #5
    • 27th Oct 15, 9:22 AM
    Hi, I guess the reason why you unable to add more specific details to your needs is that you're not a techie in cctv ah?
    Whatever. Will do my best to help you.

    There're many cctv security cameras costing not that much but with quite a good quality. But I haven't had a chance to test those, only having some experience with traditional cctv kit (dvr + cameras). I have a floureon 4ch 1200 tvl ahd cctv security camera kit and it's so far so good. This kit has four 720p cameras which offer a quite crispy view IMHO. DVR is responsible for the email alert and recording.

    If you only wanna buy some cameras with remote recording & reviewing function, ip cameras can be a good option. (IP camera can send and receive data via a computer network and the Internet, thus you can control remotely as long as hooking internet to it).

    As for ip camera, you need to focus on the following points.

    Type: Bullet or dome or turret . Bullet cameras are the most popular. They can be used inside or out. These security cameras casings are usually weather resistant and donít require added external protection. The dome cameras are obviously named for its dome shape. Dome cams are generally used inside buildings, although some domes can be used outside as well. Turret (ball) cams are also popular, I usually get them requested for indoors in professional offices. But now manufacturers make outdoor-weatherproof types of all three types of cams.

    Wireless or wired. Wired cameras can be a little bit difficult to install and not that easy to hide. While wireless cameras are plug-n-play which makes it much easier to set up.

    Weatherproof. You mentioned front and back of your house, so IP66 rating is a must.

    Lens. A camera lens with a higher focal length number will deliver more crispy viewing.

    P2P. To avoid complicated DDNS network setup, P2P function should take into account. It is the easiest and fastest one-step network setup function.

    Night vision. To see clearly under low light condition, IR led is required. Generally speaking how far the illumination of Infrared determines the night vision range.

    Network bandwidth. IP security cam requires network bandwidth to transmit and store images, video and data. The higher the resolution of your camera, the greater your bandwidth requirements.

    Hope those give you some hints.
    Men talk of killing time, while time quietly kills them.
    • mspritch
    • By mspritch 2nd Nov 15, 6:39 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    mspritch
    • #6
    • 2nd Nov 15, 6:39 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Nov 15, 6:39 PM
    If considering wireless cams, bear in mind that they still need power, and therefore wires.
    • s b
    • By s b 2nd Nov 15, 9:42 PM
    • 4,324 Posts
    • 2,348 Thanks
    s b
    • #7
    • 2nd Nov 15, 9:42 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Nov 15, 9:42 PM
    If considering wireless cams, bear in mind that they still need power, and therefore wires.
    Originally posted by mspritch
    more importantly in my opinion is the fact that people can see what your cameras are looking with basic equipment thus finding where they are and then smashing them prior to burgling you
    this is why i have gone back to wired
    • kwikbreaks
    • By kwikbreaks 3rd Nov 15, 9:59 AM
    • 8,972 Posts
    • 4,487 Thanks
    kwikbreaks
    • #8
    • 3rd Nov 15, 9:59 AM
    • #8
    • 3rd Nov 15, 9:59 AM
    And they can't figure out where wired cameras are pointing?

    Plus proper wireless IP cameras can be made reasonably private. They are still a more expensive option and still need power wires though.

    Lens. A camera lens with a higher focal length number will deliver more crispy viewing.
    Originally posted by Delia Cardei
    Focal length is much more about the field of view provided. Long focal lengths will limit the field of view which is probably not what you want unless you figure on having more cameras to cover the required area.

    Simplest to set up IMO is a CCTV DVR. You can get purpose made cables that will carry the video from and power to the cameras so it all becomes plug and play. You'll probably want to network the DVR so it can be viewed and controlled on a PC and maybe phones/tablets. There are cloud or P2P options that avoid the need to make any router settings but then you will be dependent on the manufacturers servers for remote access.
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 18th May 16, 8:56 AM
    • 5,078 Posts
    • 4,666 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    • #9
    • 18th May 16, 8:56 AM
    • #9
    • 18th May 16, 8:56 AM
    New poster, joins specifically on a thread from last year to recommend a specific camera or supplier - suspicious or what?
    • Nilrem
    • By Nilrem 18th May 16, 6:32 PM
    • 2,442 Posts
    • 1,615 Thanks
    Nilrem
    And they can't figure out where wired cameras are pointing?
    .
    Originally posted by kwikbreaks
    It's a lot harder to tell with a wired camera what the focal range of the camera is, the quality of the image, how it's dealing with low light

    For example if you've got a close in camera it might only cover the immediate area around your gate, if you've got a longer focal length camera it might cover the gate, the approach to the gate, and the edge of your drive, but just looking at the camera won't give that information.

    Personally one of the problems I would have with using wireless cameras is that if the channel gets busy, or there is interference from other devices the camera is likely to either stop working totally, or go very blocky.

    And if you go with a POE camera you can run a singe cable that does both power and signal which can be little larger than just the power cable.
    • googler
    • By googler 19th Apr 18, 3:38 PM
    • 15,211 Posts
    • 9,999 Thanks
    googler
    I/we use Arlo. There's no point in recording 24/7 if nothing is happening. The Arlo cams respond to movement. Wireless cams, cloud storage, operation from PC, tablet or smartphone, extra cams easily added to starter sets, no wiring, apart from connection between base unit and household broadband router
    • googler
    • By googler 19th Apr 18, 3:51 PM
    • 15,211 Posts
    • 9,999 Thanks
    googler
    Personally one of the problems I would have with using wireless cameras is that if the channel gets busy, or there is interference from other devices the camera is likely to either stop working totally, or go very blocky.
    Originally posted by Nilrem
    I/we have a three-camera wireless setup, and have NEVER known this to happen.
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 15th Oct 18, 10:02 AM
    • 29,147 Posts
    • 11,961 Thanks
    forgotmyname
    edwinimartin post #9 = SPAM

    csmbd post #15 = SPAM Although not as smart as edwini... it seems.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • Helpfulmum
    • By Helpfulmum 21st May 19, 1:46 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Helpfulmum
    I bought a floodlight security camera from LUTEC, they have a great range of different styles available and I highly recommend them. It's easy to access live footage from an app and communicate too, so great for your front door!
    • Frozen_up_north
    • By Frozen_up_north 21st May 19, 5:47 PM
    • 1,887 Posts
    • 964 Thanks
    Frozen_up_north
    A couple of points in addition to those already mentioned. IP network wired cameras (that are powered via the network cable) arenít that hard to install if you pick locations that allow for easy wiring. You will need to drill quite a hole to take an RJ45 plug though, not a problem with a decent DIY grade hammer drill. Donít forget that ďwirelessĒ camera needs power too.

    Spiders love cameras, make sure you can reach then with a long shaft cobweb brush. If you need a ladder to clear a cobweb itís not going to happen late at night when you notice the problem.

    An uninterruptable power supply (UPS) is well worth adding to your system, I use an APC BE700G-UK. Obviously it will power the cameras too when using network cameras powered from the recorder. Before fitting the UPS I had problems with mains glitches upsetting the recorder. Cost of the UPS is around £88 from eBay. The batteries are easy and cheap to replace when necessary. These particular supplies have 4 x ď13AĒ sockets (plus 4 that arenít battery backed) and are silent in use.
    • that
    • By that 22nd May 19, 10:02 PM
    • 1,051 Posts
    • 604 Thanks
    that
    .... how it's dealing with low light
    Originally posted by Nilrem
    Seen the IMX226 Sony starvis module? Amazing! Look on youtube.

    bowkett, if you so not know what you are doing, you may learn a lot from buying Neos Smartcam for £20 for indoor use and just fiddling
    Last edited by that; 24-05-2019 at 6:51 AM.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 23rd May 19, 10:37 AM
    • 4,393 Posts
    • 7,024 Thanks
    bouicca21
    Is it possible to have a camera indoors that covers outside through the window? I’m not allowed to mount one outside.
    • that
    • By that 23rd May 19, 7:22 PM
    • 1,051 Posts
    • 604 Thanks
    that
    Is it possible to have a camera indoors that covers outside through the window? Iím not allowed to mount one outside.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    Yessss.

    During the day it often works fine, Rain on the glass does spoil the picture a bit. some of the outside ones have a cowl (peaked lid) so the lens may stay drop free, a pointing downwards camera helps too.

    They work also at night, providing the camera does not have a built in IR source. When the IR hits the inside glass it reflects into the camera and it often makes the picture useless. Work around it is to put some black tape over the LEDs and put a pir spot light outside. On more expesive cameras you can turn the IR leds off.

    also if the room is lit, or sunlight comes in from another windows, hits the window where the camera is located, then that also could reflect. Putting a camera in a shoe box with the open side pressed against the window fixes this. Direct sunlight on the lens can also be an issue, so you would move the camera to the back of the box letting the top for a cowl (sunshade). A shortened cardboard core from a toilet roll held with duct tape also works to some extent

    My camera has movement detection. It sits indoors and monitors a small portion of my letter box. Should I get post , or should the door move I get alerts. it was once silver but clouds and sunlight made false triggers, so parts has a a strip of mat black gaffer tape on it
    Last edited by that; 24-05-2019 at 6:59 AM.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

81Posts Today

2,357Users online

Martin's Twitter