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  • FIRST POST
    • luksakura
    • By luksakura 1st Mar 18, 9:03 PM
    • 51Posts
    • 15Thanks
    luksakura
    Threat of hourly rate being reduced
    • #1
    • 1st Mar 18, 9:03 PM
    Threat of hourly rate being reduced 1st Mar 18 at 9:03 PM
    Hi.

    Out of the blue my husband has been told his hourly rate will be reduced or the sack. Ive spoken with Acas but im at a loss on how to raise a greivence politely. I dont want him to lose his job, but its scared me as im not sure it it were a idle threat or it will happen. Advise is to raise the greveince before it happens.

    Im trying to keep it brief but dont want to come over to strong as im worried he will just come up with another excuse and make him redundant. Hes worked there less than 2 years.

    Any tips would be appreciated.

    Thank you.
Page 1
    • Masomnia
    • By Masomnia 1st Mar 18, 10:02 PM
    • 17,243 Posts
    • 38,275 Thanks
    Masomnia
    • #2
    • 1st Mar 18, 10:02 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Mar 18, 10:02 PM
    Unfortunately if he's worked there less than two years then there's not much he can really do, as I think you know.

    In his situation I'd take it on the chin and look for other work ASAP. It's better than being sacked for any reason.
    I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled. - P.G. Wodehouse
    • luksakura
    • By luksakura 1st Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    • 51 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    luksakura
    • #3
    • 1st Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    Acas say its a breech of contract to reduce his hourly rate, so contract law. and to be dismissed would constitute unfair dismisal where it falls into employment law. If we raise the concern after hes docked his wage the letter will mean nothing.

    There are also issues about obtaining payslips and being paid on time. Just trying to word some thing without being threating.

    Re- Recent Issues

    Dear ....!

    I am raising concerns about recent convestaions between A and yourself regarding reducing my hourly rate. I have found this quiet ditressing and wish to point out that this is a breech of contract.!!

    Also, in regards to wage slips as an employee I have satatutory right to recieve these either the day before or on the day of payment.! Additionally, since starting on ..... I have been paid on time once. As stated in my contract this is to be on a Thursday of each week.

    I hope the above can be resloved as, the first issue has not yet happened this should not require a resolution. However regarding pay and pay slips I would like a response with 14 days. If printing is still an issue, please feel free forward electronic copies to .....

    Does this sound ok?
    • p00hsticks
    • By p00hsticks 1st Mar 18, 11:03 PM
    • 6,290 Posts
    • 6,794 Thanks
    p00hsticks
    • #4
    • 1st Mar 18, 11:03 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Mar 18, 11:03 PM
    Does this sound ok?
    Originally posted by luksakura
    If you are going to send a letter, make sure you check your spelling - there are at least five typos in your proposed wording.
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 2nd Mar 18, 7:56 AM
    • 6,226 Posts
    • 29,803 Thanks
    bugslet
    • #5
    • 2nd Mar 18, 7:56 AM
    • #5
    • 2nd Mar 18, 7:56 AM
    There can be a reduction in the hourly rate if it's with the workforce's agreement, in other words they need to consult properly.

    We did it in 2009, reduced pay by 10% for the drivers and 20% for management. We explained why and put a time limit on it, after which wages would revert to normal.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 2nd Mar 18, 8:41 AM
    • 32,419 Posts
    • 19,477 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #6
    • 2nd Mar 18, 8:41 AM
    • #6
    • 2nd Mar 18, 8:41 AM
    Does this sound ok?
    Originally posted by luksakura
    If you send that(even with the language coorections) he won't have a job.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 2nd Mar 18, 9:46 AM
    • 2,982 Posts
    • 2,944 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #7
    • 2nd Mar 18, 9:46 AM
    • #7
    • 2nd Mar 18, 9:46 AM
    Acas say its a breech of contract to reduce his hourly rate, so contract law. and to be dismissed would constitute unfair dismisal where it falls into employment law. If we raise the concern after hes docked his wage the letter will mean nothing.

    There are also issues about obtaining payslips and being paid on time. Just trying to word some thing without being threating.

    Re- Recent Issues

    Dear ....!

    I am raising concerns about recent convestaions between A and yourself regarding reducing my hourly rate. I have found this quiet ditressing and wish to point out that this is a breech of contract.!!

    Also, in regards to wage slips as an employee I have satatutory right to recieve these either the day before or on the day of payment.! Additionally, since starting on ..... I have been paid on time once. As stated in my contract this is to be on a Thursday of each week.

    I hope the above can be resloved as, the first issue has not yet happened this should not require a resolution. However regarding pay and pay slips I would like a response with 14 days. If printing is still an issue, please feel free forward electronic copies to .....

    Does this sound ok?
    Originally posted by luksakura
    He's worked there less than two years. there is no unfair dismissal.


    He's out the door and that's that. (with a weeks pilon most likely)
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 13th Mar 18, 5:04 PM
    • 6,640 Posts
    • 8,630 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 18, 5:04 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 18, 5:04 PM
    Is there an employee manual or hand book which sets out the grievance procedure.

    If not, then a simple

    "I wish to raise a formal grievance about the proposed reduction in my hourly rate. I do not consent to a reduction of my hourly from X to Y"

    The other issues are separate. If he wants to raise those then I would suggest that in the first instance he raises those separately, with HR / Payroll - either verbally or with a short note
    "I'm concerned that I haven't been getting pay or pay slips on time. My understanding is that wages are paid every Thursday, but on[list dates] payments have been made late. This does create problems. I have also typically been receiving my payslips late.

    (in relation to the pay slips, how late is late? if he is getting these a day or two late I would be inclined to let that go and focus on the delay in actual payments.)

    Are they reducing everyone's hourly rate? If so, raising it together is likely to be more effective (and less likely to result in his being singled out for retaliation). if not, does he know why?

    I would also suggest that he starts urgently looking for a new job. If the current employers are seeking to cut wages, and are also paying late, that sounds as though they are either chronically disorganised, or in financial difficulties, and either way, he's likely to be better off elsewhere.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 14th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • 16,175 Posts
    • 44,560 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    Awful feeling that there's not much he can do about this - though the firm is clearly in the wrong.

    In his position - I think I'd probably "hold my horses" on sending them a letter telling them not to do this to me. But - I would refuse to sign anything saying I had agreed to it - as I would be hoping I might stand a chance of having them for "constructive dismissal" somewhere along the line. Also making sure any paycut was notified to me in writing - and I kept it (in case I could use it as "evidence" against them in the future).

    Meanwhile - with them doing that and trying not to even pay him on time = I'd regard the firm as either mean or struggling (possibly both) and be looking hard for another job.

    When I'd safely got a job lined-up to go to (and had actually started it) then I'd investigate further as to whether I might be able to have this firm for constructive dismissal and reclaim the money they'd underpaid me by.
    ****************
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th Mar 18, 9:33 AM
    • 32,419 Posts
    • 19,477 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Awful feeling that there's not much he can do about this - though the firm is clearly in the wrong.

    In his position - I think I'd probably "hold my horses" on sending them a letter telling them not to do this to me. But - I would refuse to sign anything saying I had agreed to it - as I would be hoping I might stand a chance of having them for "constructive dismissal" somewhere along the line. Also making sure any paycut was notified to me in writing - and I kept it (in case I could use it as "evidence" against them in the future).

    Meanwhile - with them doing that and trying not to even pay him on time = I'd regard the firm as either mean or struggling (possibly both) and be looking hard for another job.

    When I'd safely got a job lined-up to go to (and had actually started it) then I'd investigate further as to whether I might be able to have this firm for constructive dismissal and reclaim the money they'd underpaid me by.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    No chance,

    Signing is not relevant to contract changes except for a few limited situations.

    with out working under protest which needs something in writing if you work and accept the new wages you have agreed to the chage in terms.
    • CKhalvashi
    • By CKhalvashi 14th Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    • 8,838 Posts
    • 25,325 Thanks
    CKhalvashi
    There can be a reduction in the hourly rate if it's with the workforce's agreement, in other words they need to consult properly.

    We did it in 2009, reduced pay by 10% for the drivers and 20% for management. We explained why and put a time limit on it, after which wages would revert to normal.
    Originally posted by bugslet
    In a personal situation there was the opposite route of freezing pay around the same time when times were tight, with the agreement that the pay would rise with inflation and be backdated as a one-off bonus payment when circumstances permitted.

    It kept the business in question running for 2 years longer than otherwise would have been possible, before being sold to a competitor with all jobs transferred and the 'bonus' being paid from the proceeds of sale, so the question has to be asked of whether it's worth having the security of a job over potentially not having one before going in all guns blazing.

    What Bugslet has said is reasonable if you take into account preventative measures to stop the company failing, should that be the case.
    "I kada sanjamo san, nek bude hiljadu raznih boja" (L. Stamenkovic)

    Call me Remainer or Romaniac, but not Remoaner. It's insulting and I have the right to have my voice heard too.

    I can spell, my iPad can't.
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