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    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 6:09 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    Downsizing
    • #1
    • 5th Aug 14, 6:09 AM
    Downsizing 5th Aug 14 at 6:09 AM
    Everyone says you should do it while you can rather than wait until you are too old/ill/frail and in principal I agree with this.

    We have a mid-terrace Victorian house so not a huge amount to downsize from. But we decided to look anyway.

    We wanted a bungalow on a bus route and near shops in a decent area. So we had a look round and came up with this:

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-41561581.html

    It is near a bus stop, near shops and other amenities and even has a local railway station just up the road (the railway runs along the back of the property but that does not bother us as it is only a local line). It has a garage (which we've never had before) and a small garden. We had a look through the windows (the property is empty) and could see that it needs a bit of work doing but we don't mind that.

    It looks just what we want.

    However..... we came back home and looked at our nice house with wildlife garden and pond and thought how could we possibly move from that into a small bungalow? We would lose a dining room, one bedroom and a large dry cellar which is used for storage and the garden is much smaller. We could just see ourselves being crammed into this little place and feeling caged up and hating it. But the point of downsizing is to have a smaller house and garden, right??

    The downsides to our house are - no garage, the street outside is like a linear car park on both sides and my husband is increasingly worried about the area declining, as more houses become buy-to-lets and more eastern European immigrants arrive (the area has always been multicultural, but the latest arrivals do seem to be very intrusive and not attempting to fit in).

    At the moment we have decided to stay put and in fact are spending a few grand on a summerhouse for the top of our long garden.

    But I'm wondering whether this is the right decision? Absolute dilemma. It's a head and heart situation.

    Discussion welcomed.

    (We are fit and healthy mid-60s. My husband does have arthritis in his knees, although this usually does not bother him too much).
    Last edited by seven-day-weekend; 05-08-2014 at 6:48 AM.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
Page 1
    • ceewash
    • By ceewash 5th Aug 14, 6:40 AM
    • 1,086 Posts
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    ceewash
    • #2
    • 5th Aug 14, 6:40 AM
    • #2
    • 5th Aug 14, 6:40 AM
    I would knock down the shed and make the garden bigger. Is there any scope in the budget / any space for a small extension to give you a dining room?
    My parents moved into a similar property aged about 65, made some alterations to it and now at the age of 80 say that it was the best thing they did. Big gardens can be such a problem as you get older. It depends on whether you want to make some money on the downsize or just find a home for the next phase of your life.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 6:48 AM
    • 34,021 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    • #3
    • 5th Aug 14, 6:48 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Aug 14, 6:48 AM
    My husband would be lost without his shed . The way the bungalow is configured there actually isn't room for a sensible extension as the bedroom goes all along the back. We did think we could convert the garage but then there would be no storage.

    We wouldn't make any money on the downsize, the price is about the same as we would get for our house.

    Thanks for your advice, I really appreciate it, as it gives ideas
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • zygurat789
    • By zygurat789 5th Aug 14, 9:08 AM
    • 4,229 Posts
    • 1,993 Thanks
    zygurat789
    • #4
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:08 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:08 AM
    Everyone says you should do it while you can rather than wait until you are too old/ill/frail and in principal I agree with this.

    We have a mid-terrace Victorian house so not a huge amount to downsize from. But we decided to look anyway.

    We wanted a bungalow on a bus route and near shops in a decent area. So we had a look round and came up with this:

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-41561581.html

    It is near a bus stop, near shops and other amenities and even has a local railway station just up the road (the railway runs along the back of the property but that does not bother us as it is only a local line). It has a garage (which we've never had before) and a small garden. We had a look through the windows (the property is empty) and could see that it needs a bit of work doing but we don't mind that.

    It looks just what we want.

    However..... we came back home and looked at our nice house with wildlife garden and pond and thought how could we possibly move from that into a small bungalow? We would lose a dining room, one bedroom and a large dry cellar which is used for storage and the garden is much smaller. We could just see ourselves being crammed into this little place and feeling caged up and hating it. But the point of downsizing is to have a smaller house and garden, right??

    The downsides to our house are - no garage, the street outside is like a linear car park on both sides and my husband is increasingly worried about the area declining, as more houses become buy-to-lets and more eastern European immigrants arrive (the area has always been multicultural, but the latest arrivals do seem to be very intrusive and not attempting to fit in).

    At the moment we have decided to stay put and in fact are spending a few grand on a summerhouse for the top of our long garden.

    But I'm wondering whether this is the right decision? Absolute dilemma. It's a head and heart situation.

    Discussion welcomed.

    (We are fit and healthy mid-60s. My husband does have arthritis in his knees, although this usually does not bother him too much).
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    I would normally think that there are plenty of properties available you may see a better one next week, keep looking. You make this sound like just what you want, could you get a family member/friend to play devil's advocate, just to remove those rose-tinted specs, after all nothing is perfect.
    If you do go ahead consider using the garage as another room/shed, after all you've never had a garage and many of those who have don't use it to put a car in (putting a wet car in a garage encourages it to rust)
    The only thing that is constant is change.
    • Goldiegirl
    • By Goldiegirl 5th Aug 14, 9:17 AM
    • 8,522 Posts
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    Goldiegirl
    • #5
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:17 AM
    • #5
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:17 AM
    Downsizing is one of those things that we feel we will do, but at some point in the future.

    We live in a 4 bedroom detached house. We've lived here for 25 years, are completely comfortable and love our home.

    But we are going to stop working, almost certainly by the end of the year.

    I'm 54, husband will be 63 in October

    So we are still relatively young and not ill or frail. Looking at it logically, it could be a good time to downsize.

    But we are not ready to move yet, and intend to enjoy living here for a good few years yet.

    We've got no target date for downsizing, but we think we we will just *know* when the time is right to move, whether it's for financial reasons or if we can no longer physically manage the upkeep of the house.

    If you are happy where you are, I would favour staying where you are.
    Early retired - 18th December 2014
    If your dreams don't scare you, they're not big enough
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 9:20 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    • #6
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:20 AM
    • #6
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:20 AM
    Downsizing is one of those things that we feel we will do, but at some point in the future.

    We live in a 4 bedroom detached house. We've lived here for 25 years, are completely comfortable and love our home.

    But we are going to stop working, almost certainly by the end of the year.

    I'm 54, husband will be 63 in October

    So we are still relatively young and not ill or frail. Looking at it logically, it could be a good time to downsize.

    But we are not ready to move yet, and intend to enjoy living here for a good few years yet.

    We've got no target date for downsizing, but we think we we will just *know* when the time is right to move, whether it's for financial reasons or if we can no longer physically manage the upkeep of the house.

    If you are happy where you are, I would favour staying where you are.
    Originally posted by Goldiegirl
    This is what I think we have decided to do. We'll keep vaguely looking, and if a place screams 'HOME!' to us, or my husband's concerns about the area we live in look as though they are coming to fruition, then we'll do something about it.

    We've lived in this house for nearly forty years, apart from the eight years we spent in Spain. It's going to take a lot to leave it.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 5th Aug 14, 9:22 AM
    • 67,732 Posts
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    PasturesNew
    • #7
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:22 AM
    • #7
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:22 AM
    The point of downsizing isn't just about size, it's about the house's suitability for you to live in it should you become less able/mobile.

    e.g. you have a cellar - you won't be going down there when you're confined to a chair. Will you really be "dining"?.... or eating your microwave dinner on a tray in your usual chair?

    Unless you've spent time trying to keep an elderly parent living in their own home you can't begin to imagine the problems it can bring.

    Maybe you're not ready to downsize.... I'd say 70 is a good age for most to start thinking about it, completing the move by 75 at the latest. You need time to get the place straight, get to know the local area, become known etc .... so 70-75 is really the best cut off point for a lot of people.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 9:25 AM
    • 34,021 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    • #8
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:25 AM
    • #8
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:25 AM
    The point of downsizing isn't just about size, it's about the house's suitability for you to live in it should you become less able/mobile.

    e.g. you have a cellar - you won't be going down there when you're confined to a chair. Will you really be "dining"?.... or eating your microwave dinner on a tray in your usual chair?

    Unless you've spent time trying to keep an elderly parent living in their own home you can't begin to imagine the problems it can bring.

    Maybe you're not ready to downsize.... I'd say 70 is a good age for most to start thinking about it, completing the move by 75 at the latest. You need time to get the place straight, get to know the local area, become known etc .... so 70-75 is really the best cut off point for a lot of people.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    If I ever get to that stage I would rather go into a home.

    I agree we are not ready to downsize. We will probably leave it ten years and then get a flat, unless we see an offer we can't refuse in the interim.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 5th Aug 14, 9:29 AM
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    PasturesNew
    • #9
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:29 AM
    • #9
    • 5th Aug 14, 9:29 AM
    If I ever get to that stage I would rather go into a home.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    Well, it could be for a temporary reason.... e.g. you took a fall down the cellar stairs and broke your hip .... so need carers to come in every day 4x a day as your OH can't get you up the stairs to bed alone, nor out of bed, can't help you shower and has turned out to be useless in the kitchen unless you want to eat toast.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 9:39 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    Well, it could be for a temporary reason.... e.g. you took a fall down the cellar stairs and broke your hip .... so need carers to come in every day 4x a day as your OH can't get you up the stairs to bed alone, nor out of bed, can't help you shower and has turned out to be useless in the kitchen unless you want to eat toast.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    That scenario is not going to happen (would have already downsized to a McCarthy and Stone place if either of us was that frail) and my husband already does all the cooking
    Last edited by seven-day-weekend; 05-08-2014 at 9:43 AM.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • iris
    • By iris 5th Aug 14, 11:34 AM
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    iris
    That scenario is not going to happen (would have already downsized to a McCarthy and Stone place if either of us was that frail) and my husband already does all the cooking
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend

    You don't have to be frail to need a hip replacement


    We moved into a bungalow 13 years ago and it was the best move we have ever made.


    My husband started having problems with his one hip in his early 60's and by 66 needed a total hip replacement and he certainly is not frail. Unfortunately his operation did not go totally to plan and he was told not to put weight on his operated leg for 3 months. I had to help him do everything. If we had had stairs I don't know how I would have coped. We also have walk-in showers, as we/he couldn't have coped with a bath at that time. Having a drive where you can take your car almost to the front door is also essential when one of you can't walk without crutches.


    Our daughter also needed a total hip replacement last year (she is only 50) and also now needs her other one replacing and also needs a knee operation. She lives in a 3 storey house and the stairs were/are a nightmare for her. They also only have a bath with shower over.


    I hope you find something suitable, but my advice would be don't leave it too long
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 11:47 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    Luckily our bathroom is downstairs and we have a walk-in shower in it. We could also temporarily use the front sitting room as a bedroom, we have done it before.

    It's just that the type of bungalow we can afford in the location we want is tiny. My husband certainly, and me probably, would go stir crazy. The particular one we have seen seems a good compromise on location and space. If we could afford it without selling our house, we would do it, so that it is ready for when we DO want to move. (Note to Self : Premium Bonds must do better ).

    Neither of us want to leave our house and garden.

    I think we are not ready to downsize yet. We are staying put for the moment, but vaguely looking whilst we are out and about.
    Last edited by seven-day-weekend; 05-08-2014 at 11:56 AM.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
  • Errata
    I think the trick to downsizing is to do it when you don't need it. The fickle finger of fate can strike at any time, don't wait until it's about to hit you.
    .....................I'm smiling because I have no idea what's going on ...
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 5th Aug 14, 12:27 PM
    • 34,021 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    I think the trick to downsizing is to do it when you don't need it. The fickle finger of fate can strike at any time, don't wait until it's about to hit you.
    Originally posted by Errata
    As I said in my OP, this is what I think too,....but now we find we don't want to leave our house for a little bungalow.

    That's the dilemma.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
  • archived user
    Every bit of me is screaming that I want to downsize. My house is not big by any stretch of the imagination but I am looking ahead.

    Sometimes when the arthritis is bad, walking down the stairs is bad enough, let alone going down the garden to peg out the washing as theres two deep steps to get down. When my son moves out I will have a bedroom that I will no longer need. The garden is too much. At the moment its not a problem but I'm looking ahead. Hubby is having mobility problems and if he has another stroke then I just wont manage it at all.

    Realistically though, I know my house isn't worth a lot and to buy something with the money tied up in my house, we will either have to spend money on it and do it up or put money to it.

    So for now I am trying to minimise everything, keep things simple. I'm getting the house how I want it but as for the garden... well that's hubbys department and he doesn't see it like I do..
    Last edited by Judi; 18-08-2014 at 8:58 PM.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 5th Aug 14, 1:02 PM
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    PasturesNew
    ....but now we find we don't want to leave our house for a little bungalow.

    That's the dilemma.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    No, you don't want to leave it for THAT little bungalow.... what you should do is get a detailed local map and take a walk around, marking down on the map the specific bungalows you WOULD consider buying.

    Then get online and look at rightmove to see if there are any past sales data on them - and photos/floorplans..... see if you could potentially afford them if/when they come up for sale next time.

    And, finally, you will have it nailed down to a few that you DO like.

    I had a neighbour some years ago that ONLY wanted to buy a bungalow in one road.... every time one came for sale she'd put her house up for sale.... (overpriced) ... and then she'd miss it. In the end, I don't know if she did ever buy a bungalow in her chosen road as I'd put mine up for sale and sold mine and moved on .... I think she waited 6-7 years before she finally sold her house (40k less than she'd first put it on at). She'd overpriced hers by about 20-25k to start with.
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 05-08-2014 at 1:05 PM.
  • Errata
    As I said in my OP, this is what I think too,....but now we find we don't want to leave our house for a little bungalow.

    That's the dilemma.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    Have you considered that the older you get the more you won't want to leave it? If you want to stay in it, why not draw up plans to future proof it and implement them asap?
    Having said all that, your main problem appears to be that your neighbourhood is going downhill rapidly; that won't be reversed in your lifetime - doesn't even happen quickly in London.
    .....................I'm smiling because I have no idea what's going on ...
    • SailorSam
    • By SailorSam 5th Aug 14, 1:23 PM
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    SailorSam
    People talking about stairs, there are always stairlifts.
    This was my Mums house before she died and has a stairlift, when i moved in i went to get rid of the lift but would have got peanuts for it, so decided to leave it in place, you never know what the future holds i may need it one day.
    It's much to big here but i tend to just clothes doors and forget what's behind them. I've got a big garden and massive garage which is great, but i suppose in 10yrs or so i may start to think they're to big.
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 5th Aug 14, 1:36 PM
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    pollypenny
    We've thought about downsizing, but rejected it. We have a big bungalow, three double beds and the garden is too big.

    However, it is a bungalow and roomy, easy to move around. it's location us ideal, as we can walk to shops, bank, hospital and library.

    We did pay a lot for it in 1987, as there were very few family homes on the market. Since 2000 there has been a number of new houses built, so I imagine families would not choose a bungalow.

    We are staying put.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
  • archived user
    People talking about stairs, there are always stairlifts.
    This was my Mums house before she died and has a stairlift, when i moved in i went to get rid of the lift but would have got peanuts for it, so decided to leave it in place, you never know what the future holds i may need it one day.
    It's much to big here but i tend to just clothes doors and forget what's behind them. I've got a big garden and massive garage which is great, but i suppose in 10yrs or so i may start to think they're to big.
    Originally posted by SailorSam

    Stairlifts don't help you vacuum the stairs, which need to be done from time to time.
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