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  • FIRST POST
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 9th Jun 15, 6:25 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Green, ethical, energy issues in the news (last 2 weeks)
    • #1
    • 9th Jun 15, 6:25 AM
    Green, ethical, energy issues in the news (last 2 weeks) 9th Jun 15 at 6:25 AM
    MSE Insert:

    We've seen some debate on this thread about the relevance of some posts to the topic.

    To ensure the thread remains on topic for forumites wanting to discuss the latest news we're asking that all posts contain a link to the news you're discussing.

    For the purposes of this thread the "news" needs to be within the last two weeks.

    Back to Martyn1981's original post.

    ---

    I thought it might be a good idea to have a thread for posting general news items that may be of interest.

    PV and the 'Solar in the news' thread attract a lot of interest, so here's a thread for all the other goings on.

    Mart.
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 09-10-2018 at 9:41 AM.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
Page 185
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 15th Oct 19, 2:43 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Close, but no cigar, yet.

    Concerns as EU bank balks at plan to halt fossil fuel investments

    The European Investment Bank (EIB) has balked at a proposal to halt new investments in fossil fuels, raising concerns that Germany and other nations are plotting to water down what would be one of the financial sector’s most ambitious climate moves.

    The EIB, the largest public bank in the world, announced this year that it would end lending to new gas projects, having already curtailed funding for coal and oil. This would free up more money for renewable energy developments. The details of the plan were expected to be confirmed by a board meeting of EU finance ministers on Tuesday but last-minute lobbying has forced a postponement.

    Executives of the bank, which is owned by EU member states, said the plan was still on course and would probably be approved next month.
    The EIB says it has provided more than €65bn of new financing for renewable energy projects, but the bank’s president, Werner Hoyer, has called for more urgency. “We believe that gas emissions are too high and cannot be maintained. We must move out of these fossil fuels. We are aware it takes a transition period. We are aware that it takes help for the regions that are dependent on coal and gas. But one should not hide behind these arguments in order to perpetuate the use of these types of materials,” he said in a recent interview.
    Yet the world of finance continues to move in the opposite direction, particularly in the private sector. In a weeklong investigation, the Guardian revealed the world’s largest investment banks and asset management companies had aggressively expanded into new coal, oil and gas projects since the 2016 Paris climate agreement. The governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, has warned that many of these assets will be left stranded, leading to bankruptcies and a growing risk of a global financial crash.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 15th Oct 19, 3:03 PM
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    Martyn1981
    22 more BYD-ADL electric buses for London

    BYD’s British partnership with ADL has delivered another 22 electric buses to Transport for London (TfL) operator Go-Ahead London. The latter has now received a total of 98 electric buses from BYD ADL with a new model being on the way.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 15th Oct 19, 3:06 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Following the recent and successful off-shore wind auctions, here is the start of the next round, looking at the leases/sites.

    Oil giants hover as UK starts offshore wind lease round

    The UK on Monday launched the first step of its 7GW-plus Round 4 offshore wind leasing process, which is expected to see more of the world’s oil and gas giants seek a slice of future development rights for turbines off Britain's coast.

    Seabed landlord the Crown Estate issued the pre-qualification questionnaire (PQQ) designed to gauge developers’ financial and technical ability to deliver the massive projects the round hopes to spur off England and Wales into the late 2020s.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • ASavvyBuyer
    • By ASavvyBuyer 15th Oct 19, 4:26 PM
    • 1,047 Posts
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    ASavvyBuyer
    A team of university scientists have developed fully autonomous robots which are able to inspect wind farms for damage.
    Rhondda Cynon Taf, 4kWp, W roof, 30° pitch, 16 x 8.33 Eternity 250w E+10 panels, Solar Edge SE4000-16A Inverter + P300 Optimisers. Inst Aug 2015.
    REUK Diverter, Toshiba RAS-10G2KVP-E Ultra High Efficiency Air Conditioner/Heat Pump, Kia Soul EV & 100% Green Electric Tariff.
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 15th Oct 19, 4:35 PM
    • 296 Posts
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    pile-o-stone
    Analysis: UK renewables generate more electricity than fossil fuels for first time
    https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis-uk-renewables-generate-more-electricity-than-fossil-fuels-for-first-time

    "In the third quarter of 2019, the UK’s windfarms, solar panels, biomass and hydro plants generated more electricity than the combined output from power stations fired by coal, oil and gas, Carbon Brief analysis reveals.

    During the three months of July, August and September, renewables generated an estimated total of 29.5 terawatt hours (TWh), compared with just 29.1TWh from fossil fuels, the analysis shows.

    This is the first-ever quarter where renewables outpaced fossil fuels since the UK’s first public electricity generating station opened in 1882. It is another symbolic milestone in the stunning transformation of the UK’s electricity system over the past decade.

    Nevertheless, a lack of progress in other parts of the economy means the UK remains far off track against its upcoming legally-binding carbon targets, let alone the recently adopted goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

    New capacity
    Over the past year, the most significant reason for rising renewable generation has been an increase in capacity as new offshore windfarms have opened. The 1,200 megawatt (MW) Hornsea One project was completed in October, becoming the world’s largest offshore windfarm. The 588MW Beatrice offshore windfarm was completed in Q2 of this year.

    These schemes add to the more than 2,100MW of offshore capacity that started operating during 2018. Further capacity is already being built, including the 714MW East Anglia One project that started generating electricity this year and will be completed in 2020.

    In total, government contracts for offshore wind will take capacity from nearly 8,500MW today to around 20,000MW by the mid-2020s. The government and industry are jointly aiming for at least 30,000MW of offshore wind capacity by 2030, with two further contract auctions already expected.

    In September, the latest auction round produced record-low deals for offshore windfarms that will generate electricity more cheaply than expected market prices – and potentially below the cost of running existing gas plants."
    Last edited by pile-o-stone; Yesterday at 4:39 PM.
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
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    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 15th Oct 19, 4:42 PM
    • 296 Posts
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    pile-o-stone
    Solar now ‘cheaper than grid electricity’ in every Chinese city, study finds
    https://www.carbonbrief.org/solar-now-cheaper-than-grid-electricity-in-every-chinese-city-study-finds

    "Solar power has become cheaper than grid electricity across China, a development that could boost the prospects of industrial and commercial solar, according to a new study.

    Projects in every city analysed by the researchers could be built today without subsidy, at lower prices than those supplied by the grid, and around a fifth could also compete with the nation’s coal electricity prices.

    They say grid parity – the “tipping point” at which solar generation costs the same as electricity from the grid – represents a key stage in the expansion of renewable energy sources.

    While previous studies of nations such as Germany and the US have concluded that solar could achieve grid parity by 2020 in most developed countries, some have suggested China would have to wait decades.

    However, the new paper published in Nature Energy concludes a combination of technological advances, cost declines and government support has helped make grid parity a reality in China today."
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
    Vegan household with 100% composted food waste
    Mini orchard planted and vegetable allotment created.
    • ASavvyBuyer
    • By ASavvyBuyer 15th Oct 19, 4:43 PM
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    ASavvyBuyer
    Not sure if a link to this site has been posted before, but it has some interesting info/graphs/maps.

    https://www.mygridgb.co.uk/historicaldata/

    https://www.mygridgb.co.uk/map/
    Rhondda Cynon Taf, 4kWp, W roof, 30° pitch, 16 x 8.33 Eternity 250w E+10 panels, Solar Edge SE4000-16A Inverter + P300 Optimisers. Inst Aug 2015.
    REUK Diverter, Toshiba RAS-10G2KVP-E Ultra High Efficiency Air Conditioner/Heat Pump, Kia Soul EV & 100% Green Electric Tariff.
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 15th Oct 19, 4:49 PM
    • 3,860 Posts
    • 2,890 Thanks
    GreatApe
    https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis-uk-renewables-generate-more-electricity-than-fossil-fuels-for-first-time

    "In the third quarter of 2019, the UK’s windfarms, solar panels, biomass and hydro plants generated more electricity than the combined output from power stations fired by coal, oil and gas, Carbon Brief analysis reveals.

    During the three months of July, August and September, renewables generated an estimated total of 29.5 terawatt hours (TWh), compared with just 29.1TWh from fossil fuels, the analysis shows.

    This is the first-ever quarter where renewables outpaced fossil fuels since the UK’s first public electricity generating station opened in 1882. It is another symbolic milestone in the stunning transformation of the UK’s electricity system over the past decade.

    Nevertheless, a lack of progress in other parts of the economy means the UK remains far off track against its upcoming legally-binding carbon targets, let alone the recently adopted goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050."
    Originally posted by pile-o-stone

    The new interconntors under construction will reduce gas burn in the UK grid considerably

    2 X 1GW links to France almost finished one is due in January I think and the other later in 2020

    Just those two will likely import enough net energy to cover the annual energy consumption of 4 million homes which is all of the homes in London and then some


    Heating needs to be addressed
    Maybe deploy heat pumps and or resistance heaters (depending on demand for a given type of property) on all council properties

    That is almost 5 million properties that should create a market and the skills to then deploy it on the other 25 million or so private homes
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 15th Oct 19, 4:50 PM
    • 296 Posts
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    pile-o-stone
    https://interactive.carbonbrief.org/how-uk-transformed-electricity-supply-decade/

    This is a great history lesson of how the UK has transformed its energy supply over the last decade. It was interesting to see the energy companies saying a decade ago that we had to build new coal-fired power stations "or the lights would go out" and then see how they were discredited.
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
    Vegan household with 100% composted food waste
    Mini orchard planted and vegetable allotment created.
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 15th Oct 19, 5:56 PM
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    GreatApe
    https://interactive.carbonbrief.org/how-uk-transformed-electricity-supply-decade/

    This is a great history lesson of how the UK has transformed its energy supply over the last decade. It was interesting to see the energy companies saying a decade ago that we had to build new coal-fired power stations "or the lights would go out" and then see how they were discredited.
    Originally posted by pile-o-stone

    Makes me smile
    The UK didn't do much to transform it's electricity industry
    What happened was mostly random factors and I'll try to post them in order of importance

    Efficiency especially of light bulbs reduced peak demand from roughly 65GW to 50GW
    The UK nukes got life extensions
    New CCGTs were built
    Shale gas reduced global natural gas prices and LNG trade allowed gas to be more secure than in the past

    These factors allowed the UK to implement a carbon tax which made coal unprofitable and the coal fleet could be closed because of the factors above.

    Wind and PV played a small part
    Going from about 5.5 TWh to 70.0 TWh
    That Means the UK over the decade added wind and solar at s rate of about 2% per year of its grid
    And remember we use more for heating and transport than we do electricity generation.

    The hard work was done mostly by efficiency
    Things like 65% efficient boilers replaced by 90% efficient ones
    Houses insulated.
    35% efficient coal stations replaced by 61% efficient CCGTs
    Not to mention a recession and globalisation kicking down our bulk manufacturing capacity
    I think the last of the UK aluminium smelters was closed not long ago not to mention steel capacity closure

    So yes UK fossil fuel consumption is down a lot over the decade but wind and solar are only a small side story but who wants to hear about efficiency or aluminium and steel plants closing down.....
    Last edited by GreatApe; Yesterday at 6:10 PM.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Oct 19, 7:08 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Other the years I think we've talked about the return of sails to ships (and the use of large kites by many, to reduce fuel consumption), but here's a new article/update:

    Wind Power Returns To Oceangoing Cargo Ships, Finally
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Oct 19, 7:15 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Tories also appear to be considering a revision to the 2040 date for the end of ICE sales, cool! And if we see a 'green war' erupting between the major parties, then we could all benefit from the collateral damage!

    UK plans to accelerate decarbonisation of transport sector

    The UK government has vowed to accelerate its climate action for transport sector by drafting new plans to end emissions from trains, planes and cars by 2050.

    Ministers promised to begin the groundwork on the government’s first detailed plan to decarbonise the transport sector immediately, and unveil the plan in full next year.

    The climate action roadmap will be one of many new government climate proposals expected in 2020 to help meet the UK’s legally binding target to build a carbon neutral economy by 2050.

    The plans follow a damning rebuke from the UK’s Committee on Climate Change (CCC) earlier this year, in which John Gummer, the committee chair, likened the government’s climate efforts to the TV comedy Dad’s Army.
    The transport climate roadmap is expected to bring forward a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2040 after Shapps told the Conservative party conference this month that the government would “thoroughly explore the case” for a 2035 deadline.

    And there's more:

    The government also hopes to unleash a large-scale battery boom by cutting red tape in the planning system for energy storage projects larger than 50MW. This should help energy companies build bigger batteries faster, and at lower costs, to make help use more of the UK’s renewable electricity projects.

    Under separate plans the government has proposed setting out tougher minimum energy efficiency standards for rented workplaces which could put British businesses in line for savings of around £1bn a year on energy bills.

    But even more would be even better:

    The campaign group Transport and Environment said the plan to accelerate the transport sector’s climate agenda does not go far enough. The group said ministers should have announced a 2030 ban on the sale of new combustion engine vehicles, an end to the fuel duty freeze and new taxes on aviation.

    Chris Stark, the chief executive of the CCC, said: “When it comes to preparing for the effects of climate change, the government’s approach continues to rest on the need for further research and guidance, instead of action. Meanwhile, the country remains unprepared for even a 2C rise in global temperature.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Oct 19, 1:00 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Great news for large scale storage in the UK as regulations are to be changed / eased.

    BEIS unveils ‘significant’ changes to planning regulations for energy storage

    The government is set to remove a significant barrier to utility-scale storage sites, proposing changes to planning regulations to allow projects over 50MW to proceed without government approval.

    The new proposals, unveiled yesterday by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) follow a previous consultation in January​ on planning policy for storage sites.

    As it stands, projects over 50MW in England and 350MW in Wales must secure approval via the Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP) process. The previous consultation proposed to keep the 50MW threshold but create a new capacity threshold for co-located storage to bypass the requirement for NSIP approval.​

    But under the new proposals, larger storage projects could receive consent from tlocal planning authorities under the Town and Country Planning Act.

    Requiring storage projects to go through the NSIP has been cited as a significant hurdle for large storage projects, in particular by the Electricity Storage Network (ESN), for the additional time and cost it requires.

    According to ESN members, NSIP adds an estimated 18 months to three years to project lead times and costs can reach hundreds of thousands, compared to tens of thousands through the local planning regime.

    Madeleine Greenhalgh, policy lead for the Electricity Storage Network, said the new proposals are a “significant and positive change”.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 16th Oct 19, 1:27 PM
    • 701 Posts
    • 2,955 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Tories also appear to be considering a revision to the 2040 date for the end of ICE sales, cool!
    :
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    I guess we have to applaud any revision for the date to end ICE sales but given that most cars have at least a 15year life span these days then why not go for something more radical! If it was stopped at the end of next year most would still be on the road beyond 2040! As it is currently, most would still be going in 2065!

    We're obviously not taking this matter very seriously!
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus one dirty diesel. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Oct 19, 1:35 PM
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    Martyn1981
    I guess we have to applaud any revision for the date to end ICE sales but given that most cars have at least a 15year life span these days then why not go for something more radical! If it was stopped at the end of next year most would still be on the road beyond 2040! As it is currently, most would still be going in 2065!

    We're obviously not taking this matter very seriously!
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    I'm with you, but the problem seems to be supply limitations at the moment. More than one Tesla Euro Gigafactory .... perhaps?
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 16th Oct 19, 2:11 PM
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    Coastalwatch
    I'm with you, but the problem seems to be supply limitations at the moment. More than one Tesla Euro Gigafactory .... perhaps?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Point taken and agreed with. Just thinking a little further, I wonder if by setting such a deadline there would be a huge demand to get the last ICE's produced so that it may be another three of four years before EV production would need to ramp up significantly to replace them. So about five years hence! Seeing how most of the manufacturers are going hook, line and sinker to get their EV's into the market place asap I wonder if the biggest problem would be the cost to manufactureres of divesting from ICE rather than gearing up to satisfy the mass market for EV's.
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus one dirty diesel. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
    • 1961Nick
    • By 1961Nick 16th Oct 19, 3:22 PM
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    1961Nick
    I'm with you, but the problem seems to be supply limitations at the moment. More than one Tesla Euro Gigafactory .... perhaps?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    There appears to be a golden opportunity for the UK to get in on the ground floor of the likely explosion of EV manufacture. We have the facilities, the workforce & the design/engineering expertise to be out in front of this business.

    Bringing the date of the ICE ban forward to 2040 probably wont make any practical difference. Doing it by 2035 would give the migration to EVs some impetus now without being too onerous on a struggling car industry.

    I'll take a view on 2030 when the outcome of Brexit is known.
    4kWp (black/black) - Sofar Inverter - SSE(141°) - 30° pitch - North Lincs
    Installed June 2013 - PVGIS = 3400

    Sofar ME3000SP Inverter & 5 x Pylontech US2000B Plus Batteries - 12kWh
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 16th Oct 19, 4:33 PM
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    GreatApe
    A ban on petrol cars makes no sense as hybrids are perfectly acceptable

    It should be a ban on any car which doesn't have 40 mile real world electric Only range
    Such a ban can be put in place much sooner and would be far more realistic

    With charging infrastructure everywhere a plug in hybrid with 50 mile range would see average users like me become 98% electric miles 2% petrol. Perfectly acceptable and even better for the environment as you can build 5-10x as many plug in Hybrids as pure BEVs for a given number of battery cells

    There can be 50 mile hybrids and 100 mile hybrids.
    Probably 90% would buy the 50 mile version and 10% the 100 mile version

    In fact if a 70 mile hybrid Tesla model 3 existed I would wager it would be the best seller of the lot
    It would have a lower mass and a lower cost to manufacture. And Tesla could make 3x as many with the same number of batteries. Could even be rear wheels Electric front wheels petrol and in sports mode can use both combined.


    Medium range Hybrids solve all the problems of electrification
    50 mile range X 5,000 cycles = 250,000 miles which is more than enough for a typical car
    All the good sides of petrol and electric and you get 95-99% electric miles


    Why carry around a petrol engine and fuel tank if your almost never use it?
    Well why carry around 200-400 miles of batteries if you almost never go beyond 70 miles?
    A small petrol engine and a small fuel tank would weigh less than the Batteries to take a hybrid from 70 miles to be a full BEV with 300 miles
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 16th Oct 19, 4:43 PM
    • 3,860 Posts
    • 2,890 Thanks
    GreatApe
    There appears to be a golden opportunity for the UK to get in on the ground floor of the likely explosion of EV manufacture. We have the facilities, the workforce & the design/engineering expertise to be out in front of this business.

    Bringing the date of the ICE ban forward to 2040 probably wont make any practical difference. Doing it by 2035 would give the migration to EVs some impetus now without being too onerous on a struggling car industry.

    I'll take a view on 2030 when the outcome of Brexit is known.
    Originally posted by 1961Nick

    The UK isn't particularly strong in car manufacturing
    The three big countries are China Japan Germany USA
    The UK forcing BEV only doesn't give the UK industry a boost as we have free trade any country can sell into the UK

    The 2020s will be the decade electrification actually starts

    BEVs. 250-400 miles on electric. 100% miles electric
    Oil cars. 0 miles electric 500 miles oil. 0% miles electric
    Hybrids. 50 miles electric 400 miles oil. Overall 95% miles electric

    Longer range Hybrids have the best of all worlds
    70 mile hybrid model 3 for say £33k is more interesting than a 210 mile model 3 BEV for £40k
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