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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Sarah
    • By MSE Sarah 11th Jun 19, 2:15 PM
    • 208Posts
    • 87Thanks
    MSE Sarah
    Money Moral Dilemma: Should I tell my employer it has overpaid me?
    • #1
    • 11th Jun 19, 2:15 PM
    Money Moral Dilemma: Should I tell my employer it has overpaid me? 11th Jun 19 at 2:15 PM
    This week's MoneySaver who wants advice asks...

    A few months ago I started a new role, in return for an 'acting-up' allowance. This was paid correctly the first month, but for the following two months they incorrectly added it to my base salary, and still paid a separate acting-up allowance on top.

    Unfortunately the MSE team can't always answer money moral dilemma questions as contributions are often emailed in or suggested in person. They are intended to be enjoyed as a point of debate and discussed at face value.

    If you havenít already, join the forum to reply!

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Page 3
    • BFH6BA
    • By BFH6BA 12th Jun 19, 12:40 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    BFH6BA
    Would you tell them if they underpaid you? Of course you would, cos' you'd want fair play.
    You are dishonest & IMMORAL of you don't advise them of overpay. They will find out in the end anyway.
    Put it this way, if you worked for me and showed dishonesty like that, I'd FIRE you at the earliest opportunity as untrustworthy. It wouldn't look good on your CV...
    • happyinflorida
    • By happyinflorida 12th Jun 19, 8:31 PM
    • 779 Posts
    • 668 Thanks
    happyinflorida
    Of course you should tell them - why haven't you done so immediately?

    You do realise by not telling them, you probably now won't get promotion because you'll be seen as untrustworthy?

    I cannot believe you are even asking this question.

    What a dishonest person you are. Shame on you.
    • antonic
    • By antonic 13th Jun 19, 2:51 AM
    • 1,834 Posts
    • 2,665 Thanks
    antonic
    In the Civil Service its a disciplinary offence NOT to notify HR is you spot a mistake on your monthly payslip , such as in this case.
    The onus is on YOU as the jobholder to make them aware you cant get away with blaming HR.
    (Or you could if you want to be dismissed !).
    LBM Sept 2005 spoke to Payplan - brilliant !
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    • Autumn86
    • By Autumn86 13th Jun 19, 3:25 AM
    • 209 Posts
    • 59 Thanks
    Autumn86
    Wow this forum literally is just packed full of timid wimpy wussy goody-goody neeks and nerds!!

    In reality ofcourse any/every normal person wouldn't say anything!

    It's not your job to 'pay yourself' what you think your monthly salary is meant to be,
    Nor do you have any legal responsibility to actually even check your bank balance each month to see how much you got paid exactly.

    If the employer overpays you that's their loss.
    You simply need to ''not notice ", and subsequently not rock the boat.


    I have previously been overpaid by nearly £4,600 total (split between 2-occassions at 2 different employers), where I booked annual-leave days that I wasn't entitled to (or rather wouldn't be unless I actually worked the required number of shifts that year to qualify in retrospect).

    It was simple tbh, as both very huge companies so mass admin, thus minimal attention to details by them;
    And whilst I had full-time permenant employment contracts with both companies, ultimately my shifts were assigned by the site which I was working at, not by the corporate head-office company itself....
    So all I did was simply work a few weeks at a site (over the course of 2-3 months), take 14-days in a row of annual-leave, got paid those 14-days at the end of that month; But I then simply declined to opt-in for future shifts at that site, and thus basically just being forgotten about by them, but yet still showing on the head-company's book as being a permenant employee of theirs (since I hadn't ever resigned).


    At the time that setup suited me fine as I already had a solid regular monthly income from benefits, a weekend cash-in-hand job, and student finance loan + grant money | So was a excellent opportunity and gift of a few thousand in free cash.
    • Kentish Dave
    • By Kentish Dave 13th Jun 19, 4:55 AM
    • 806 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Kentish Dave
    Autumn, I know that you are only here to wind people up, but do you not think that being the sort of person who does this and your dishonesty is why you are not doing so well in life?

    Your written English while not great is decent enough, suggesting that you did at least pay attention in school, and have some ability to learn so you need to ask yourself what else brought you here, glorying in trying to make other people unhappy.

    You donít earn much money, you are not in a good job, and you get your fun by being unpleasant. What would your mother think if she saw this? Do you genuinely think that when you grow up youíll feel pleased that you did it?

    I do feel sorry for you, but this is no way for any decent person to act.
    • Autumn86
    • By Autumn86 13th Jun 19, 5:04 AM
    • 209 Posts
    • 59 Thanks
    Autumn86
    Actually all of what I did was perfectly legitimate and legal.

    As I was perfectly entitled to book annual-leave, and I was perfectly entitled to choose if I opt-in for working for a specific employer or not.


    If they had chosen to contact me and requested any money back, I would of reviewed their request and then refunded them any money which they were legally entitled to...
    But if they didn't contact me to submit any such request, well that's their responsibility for failing to check their payroll setup properly (or maybe they were aware but felt I deserved the money).
    • Autumn86
    • By Autumn86 13th Jun 19, 5:09 AM
    • 209 Posts
    • 59 Thanks
    Autumn86
    In the Civil Service its a disciplinary offence NOT to notify HR is you spot a mistake on your monthly payslip , such as in this case.
    The onus is on YOU as the jobholder to make them aware you cant get away with blaming HR.
    (Or you could if you want to be dismissed !).
    Originally posted by antonic

    You have no obligation to check your payslip if you choose not to,
    as it's the employer's job to operate payroll, and pay you the sum of money which they choose to each month.

    You have no duty whatsoever to proof-read & check their sums for them, nor any obligation to look at your payslip if you choose not to.


    So they couldn't ''blame you for not noticing a mistake they made".
    • Angelfeathers
    • By Angelfeathers 13th Jun 19, 7:32 AM
    • 371 Posts
    • 1,371 Thanks
    Angelfeathers
    Not exactly a dilemma, is it!
    I'm broke, not poor. Poor sounds permanent, broke can be fixed. (Thoroughly Modern Millie)
    LBM June 2009, Debt Free (except mortgage) Sept 2016 - DONE IT!
    • Exodi
    • By Exodi 13th Jun 19, 11:00 AM
    • 850 Posts
    • 1,079 Thanks
    Exodi
    You have no obligation to check your payslip if you choose not to,
    as it's the employer's job to operate payroll, and pay you the sum of money which they choose to each month.

    You have no duty whatsoever to proof-read & check their sums for them, nor any obligation to look at your payslip if you choose not to.


    So they couldn't ''blame you for not noticing a mistake they made".
    Originally posted by Autumn86
    So by extension you'd take no issue with being underpaid and wouldn't expect reimbursement?
    Know what you don't
    • Yep789
    • By Yep789 13th Jun 19, 4:25 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Yep789
    Absolutely, yes
    If you know that you have been paid incorrectly but fail to declare it you will end up having to pay it back possibly in installments for ages if you can agree a repayment plan. Your other dilemma is your employer will think that you are dishonest and not to be trusted which could lead to no further opportunities being offered to you.
    • Autumn86
    • By Autumn86 13th Jun 19, 6:16 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 59 Thanks
    Autumn86
    So by extension you'd take no issue with being underpaid and wouldn't expect reimbursement?
    Originally posted by Exodi

    It is upto me if I choose to look at my payslip, in the privacy of my own home, or not | Thus something which can never be proven...

    But so it'd always just happen to be a lucky coincidence that I did notice any underpayments, but didn't notice any overpayments.


    *In my job my actual takehome pay varies each month though (depending on how many of my shifts were on a Saturday, Sunday, or Night | As all those shifts are pair with an enhancement rate ontop of my pay-band base salary),
    So for all I know I could be getting underpaid/ or overpaid by £100+ per month.
    • Lou lou12345
    • By Lou lou12345 13th Jun 19, 7:10 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Lou lou12345
    As a Payroll Manager my advice is to tell your employer. They are within the law to recover the overpayment from you. They will notice eventually and you will have to pay it back. If you bring their attention to it you will be respected for your honesty.
    • Jubee
    • By Jubee 13th Jun 19, 8:54 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Jubee
    Yes
    If your employer realises in due course that you have been overpaid they will ask you to repay the sum owed. Most employers will adopt a reasonable approach and if you cannot afford to repay it as a lump sum may allow you to repay it in instalments. However if your employer doesnít take this approach , even if you have not agreed to repay, the law allows them to deduct the overpayment from your salary.
    They employer will know that most employees will know if an overpayment has occurred because your salary is more than was expected and could take a dim view of your failure to notify them. The exception will be if your contract is incorrect or in your case if the arrangements for your temp increase in pay were incorrect and your salary is aligned with the incorrect statement in your contract.
    • charlie792
    • By charlie792 15th Jun 19, 8:22 AM
    • 1,698 Posts
    • 5,390 Thanks
    charlie792
    As others have said not really moral dilemma.
    Employers can (and will) seek re-imbursment, and depending on what your contract says can deduct this from your salary automatically without agreement from you.

    We actually had this very situation recently, an employee had an agreement with management at the outset to work a set number of days a week and was offered X salary. Due to a misunderstanding they were paid the full salary rather than it pro-rata based on the days they worked. The employee genuinely didn't know the salary they were receiving wasn't correct. This went on for two years and only came to light when they put in an application to go full time - when payroll said 'hang on your full time already'
    The employee ended up owing several thousand pounds - due to the amount it was agreed a repayment plan was set up with an agreed amount deducted automatically each month until repaid, with the proviso that any balance outstanding is repayable in full if they leave employment with the company.

    Things catch up with you eventually.
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    • Ebenezer_Screwj
    • By Ebenezer_Screwj 19th Jun 19, 7:45 AM
    • 437 Posts
    • 231 Thanks
    Ebenezer_Screwj
    If you were being underpaid would you say anything? Tell them about it now, it will catch up with you in the end.
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