Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Jak1211
    • By Jak1211 20th Sep 19, 7:13 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Jak1211
    Do I quit already??
    • #1
    • 20th Sep 19, 7:13 PM
    Do I quit already?? 20th Sep 19 at 7:13 PM
    This is quite a long story, so here goes...

    I was working in my last role for about 3 and a half years in B2B sales, It was a good job - very flexible, good commission scheme, I got on really well with my boss and colleagues and it was at a very stable reputable company.

    Just under 3 years in, I was promoted in to a management position and I grew to hate the role. I still got on with everyone around me, the money was still good and I still had the same flexibility but I hated not being in a sales role anymore and couldn't handle managing people.

    5 months in to my promotion, I made the decision to travel europe for 5 weeks and unfortunately because the company stance was no more than 2 weeks annual leave, I was told I would need to leave to do this and so I gave them 3 months notice. Fortunately I managed to secure a role at a start-up company ready for when I got back from my travels and they were happy to wait 3 months for me.

    6 weeks in and I do not like it, It isn't face to face, there isn't any customer interaction and I find myself clock watching. The funny thing is, I have done really well and generated £12k worth of sales profit for them during the short time I have been there. The company is actually a really great place to work, the directors are great and really happy with me, the people are nice, it's so flexible and I no longer have to work Saturdays. I am not earning anywhere near what I was earning in my last role but if I was to stay there for a couple of years it would be better financially in the long run. However, the plan is to start (currently doing part time) my own business in the next year or two, so this may be irrelevant.

    My old boss has since contacted asking me if I would like to go back to my old sales role, something I am really keen on doing as I know I can hit the ground running, earn good money straight away and work with good people in a role I find more enjoyable.

    I am now in a situation as to whether I stick out my new role and give it a good go or go back to my old role (let my new directors down who will probably take it personally as a start-up) and risk regretting everything, because sometimes it can just be the complete shock of change.

    In my situation, what would you do?
Page 1
    • Marcon
    • By Marcon 20th Sep 19, 8:27 PM
    • 1,269 Posts
    • 1,005 Thanks
    Marcon
    • #2
    • 20th Sep 19, 8:27 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Sep 19, 8:27 PM
    Ever heard the phrase 'going back never works'? If your old company had been that keen to keep you, they'd have let you take time off to travel.

    Unless you are very sure that the grass is greener in the old paddock, give this new job a fair trial - but don't worry how the directors might 'take it' if you leave. Not an issue you need to worry about - and they won't want an employee who isn't happy and isn't committed.
    Last edited by Marcon; 20-09-2019 at 10:27 PM.
    • tacpot12
    • By tacpot12 20th Sep 19, 10:00 PM
    • 2,906 Posts
    • 2,627 Thanks
    tacpot12
    • #3
    • 20th Sep 19, 10:00 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Sep 19, 10:00 PM
    I'm with Marcon on this. There are too many unknowns involved in going back. I would stick with the current job, and move into your own business as soon as you can make it sustainable.
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always check official information sources before relying on my posts.
    • JReacher1
    • By JReacher1 21st Sep 19, 6:30 AM
    • 3,226 Posts
    • 4,495 Thanks
    JReacher1
    • #4
    • 21st Sep 19, 6:30 AM
    • #4
    • 21st Sep 19, 6:30 AM
    There is nothing wrong with going back to your old job. A complicated decision like this can not be solved with a generic throwaway phrase of “going back never works”. In lots of occasions it does work. As an example I regularly recruit people who were previous employees of the company and it works out very well for all parties. I get an experienced employee who can hit the ground running and they get a higher salary, and a working environment they know.

    It is possible your previous employer only realised how important you were after you had left. As a result they are keen to have you back.

    Only really you can make this decision but I would go with your gut. If you don’t like your new job then return to your old one. Or even as a third option look for a completely new job.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 21st Sep 19, 7:17 AM
    • 37,445 Posts
    • 23,121 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #5
    • 21st Sep 19, 7:17 AM
    • #5
    • 21st Sep 19, 7:17 AM
    .........
    However, the plan is to start (currently doing part time) my own business in the next year or two, so this may be irrelevant.
    ............
    Originally posted by Jak1211
    If you want that to work you need to earn as much as you can from others while setting it up and/or pick the job that give the right amount of time to focus on the new business.

    If this venture is totally independent of the sectors of both companies then fine just be aware of any conflict of interests and any requirements to let the companies know you have another job.

    Don't be too bothered about upsetting people they will be ruthless when needed.

    how much of a gap would it be for the current place to match the old place, if you are pulling in the business might they counter offer?

    If they might be prepared, I would consider give them a chance to show they value you by putting a case for more money.

    Depending how they react you can decide to stay or move on.
    • Takeaway_Addict
    • By Takeaway_Addict 21st Sep 19, 8:51 AM
    • 6,094 Posts
    • 7,030 Thanks
    Takeaway_Addict
    • #6
    • 21st Sep 19, 8:51 AM
    • #6
    • 21st Sep 19, 8:51 AM
    Ever heard the phrase 'going back never works'? If your old company had been that keen to keep you, they'd have let you take time off to travel.

    Unless you are very sure that the grass is greener in the old paddock, give this new job a fair trial - but don't worry how the directors might 'take it' if you leave. Not an issue you need to worry about - and they won't want an employee who isn't happy and isn't committed.
    Originally posted by Marcon
    Not sure I agree, not many companies however well they like a person would allow this and it also depends on the time of year as well
    Don't trust a forum for advice. Get proper paid advice. Any advice given should always be checked
    • Jak1211
    • By Jak1211 21st Sep 19, 10:14 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Jak1211
    • #7
    • 21st Sep 19, 10:14 AM
    • #7
    • 21st Sep 19, 10:14 AM
    In regards to not wanting to keep me, my boss who hired me was desperate to keep me and did everything in his power to do so but being a PLC, company policy is company policy unfortunately and ultimately his decision was overuled.
    • Jak1211
    • By Jak1211 21st Sep 19, 10:20 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Jak1211
    • #8
    • 21st Sep 19, 10:20 AM
    • #8
    • 21st Sep 19, 10:20 AM
    In regards to money, the reason it is considerably less isn't because of a drop of salary but due to a different commission scheme. The plan at my last place was probably the best in its sector whereas now you really don't earn much until you start hitting mega numbers due to the bandings - something which will be difficult to do for the first couple of years as that particular industry is low volume sales with hundreds of competitors in the region.

    My last place, was the only one of it's kind in the area, so no real direct competition.

    So far it is probably costing me around £1k per NET in wages.
    • Jak1211
    • By Jak1211 21st Sep 19, 10:21 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Jak1211
    • #9
    • 21st Sep 19, 10:21 AM
    • #9
    • 21st Sep 19, 10:21 AM
    *£1k per month NET in wages.
    • amandacat
    • By amandacat 21st Sep 19, 12:16 PM
    • 85 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    amandacat
    Thereís a few things to consider here, firstly if you go back to your old job in sales, how will you find the transition from going from your previous management role back to sales? While you mightíve enjoyed sales more than management, do you think youíll cope with being back at a lower level working with people you perhaps previously managed or being managed by someone who may have previously been at the same level as you? This is easy for some people but more difficult for others.

    Also consider why you went from sales to management in the first place, was it simply a promotion or increased salary opportunity or were there aspects of the sales job you didnít enjoy? It is easy to look back on other roles with rose tinted glasses, particularly if you donít enjoy your current job. Was there something that stopped you asking to go back to sales then as if there was then that issue wonít have gone away.

    There is nothing worse than not enjoying a job or clock watching and ultimately you need to put yourself first and not worry about the business, provided you give the required notice then you shouldnít worry about leaving if itís the right thing for you. But you may want to give it a few weeks to see if things improve or even have a chat with your manager about how youíre feeling, they might be able to adjust your responsibilities. They might not but at least a frank discussion will allow them to know how you feel and if they canít help you then it wonít be a shock to them if you resign.

    I moved into management about 5 years ago and hated it initially but do now enjoy it a lot more. That said if I could go back to a client facing lower level role for similar cash then I would for less stress but I could never do it in my current company as Iíd find it difficult to be managed by someone who I may have previously managed myself as I know the business too well and know Iíd be too difficult to manage . Iíve seen staff leave and return, perhaps 6 staff members and all but 1 have left again as they remembered the reasons they left in the first place. That said the 1 who returned and has stayed is very happy with his decision.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,984Posts Today

8,342Users online

Martin's Twitter