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    • fleetingmind
    • By fleetingmind 24th Jun 19, 7:52 AM
    • 422Posts
    • 61Thanks
    fleetingmind
    Suggestions for good Knife/Knives Set
    • #1
    • 24th Jun 19, 7:52 AM
    Suggestions for good Knife/Knives Set 24th Jun 19 at 7:52 AM
    Really want a decent knife set and it's a bit of a minefield. Ours are cheap supermarket ones and go blunt very easily.

    Parents have got a set of Global ones but far too pricey for me sadly.

    Any ideas of a decent set. About £50 but would go to £100 for the rights set that would last me well.

    Friend suggested Sabatier Professional range.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by fleetingmind; 24-06-2019 at 7:54 AM.
Page 1
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 24th Jun 19, 8:03 AM
    • 4,318 Posts
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    Ebe Scrooge
    • #2
    • 24th Jun 19, 8:03 AM
    • #2
    • 24th Jun 19, 8:03 AM
    When it comes to kitchen knives, you really do get what you pay for. Sabatier are good, you might also want to look at Victorinox (manufacturer of the original Swiss Army Knife). Neither will be cheap, but if you look after them they really will last you forever. Don't keep them in a cutlery drawer with everything else, that's a surefire way to ruin them. Keep them in a wooden block or on a magnetic strip (we bought one from Ikea for just a couple of quid years ago, but you can get them anywhere).

    You may be better off buying individual knives, rather than a set. This spreads the cost, plus you won't end up with knives that you never use. Start off with one or two that you know you need (carving, paring, filleting, whatever it may be), then buy individual knives when you decide that you really do need it and will use it. Get a decent sharpening steel as well, and like I say they should last you forever. Hope this helps.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • Kentish Dave
    • By Kentish Dave 24th Jun 19, 8:14 AM
    • 452 Posts
    • 742 Thanks
    Kentish Dave
    • #3
    • 24th Jun 19, 8:14 AM
    • #3
    • 24th Jun 19, 8:14 AM
    I’ve no idea about cheaper ones, sorry, so my suggestion would be to buy good ones over time, and my favorites are Global.

    Get one 17 -20 cm utility knife and something to sharpen it properly with and you’ll use that for nearly everything until you want the next one.
    • fleetingmind
    • By fleetingmind 24th Jun 19, 8:20 AM
    • 422 Posts
    • 61 Thanks
    fleetingmind
    • #4
    • 24th Jun 19, 8:20 AM
    • #4
    • 24th Jun 19, 8:20 AM
    Iíve no idea about cheaper ones, sorry, so my suggestion would be to buy good ones over time, and my favorites are Global.

    Get one 17 -20 cm utility knife and something to sharpen it properly with and youíll use that for nearly everything until you want the next one.
    Originally posted by Kentish Dave
    Thank you.

    I assume you can't put these in the dishwasher?

    What would you use to sharpen them and do you have to sharpen every time you use them which I have read earlier?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 24th Jun 19, 9:25 AM
    • 27,131 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 24th Jun 19, 9:25 AM
    • #5
    • 24th Jun 19, 9:25 AM
    I'd agree that you probably only need one large chef's knife and a sharpener.

    I have a couple of identical and cheap and cheerful John Lewis own brand chefs knives that are in one piece, like the global ones, and one smaller one for occasionally odd things like slicing into an avocado without taking my fingers off. I have a Joseph Joseph sharpening tool as I find it more reliable than the sharpening rods - one of those in the wrong hands and they can completely blunt a knife!

    I'm sure if you're proper cheffy, there's need for wider range, which you can build up over time, but I know I've got better knife skills and speed than most people and it's mainly because of my big knife! The weight in the wider part of the blade is so satisfying and you barely need to lift the top end from the board.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • chippy2u
    • By chippy2u 24th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    • 298 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    chippy2u
    • #6
    • 24th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    • #6
    • 24th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    Do not put chefs knives in the dishwasher! All the banging about will soon take the edge off the knife. Plus the detergent used can be very abrasive. Hand wash in warm soapy water.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 24th Jun 19, 10:44 AM
    • 24,769 Posts
    • 52,148 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    • #7
    • 24th Jun 19, 10:44 AM
    • #7
    • 24th Jun 19, 10:44 AM
    Thank you.

    I assume you can't put these in the dishwasher?

    What would you use to sharpen them and do you have to sharpen every time you use them which I have read earlier?
    Originally posted by fleetingmind
    I have a mixture Wusthof and Zwilling JA Henckels knives (both of which I would recommend). I put mine in the dishwasher, doesn't seem to harm them but they are in slots so they don't 'bang about' in a cutlery canister.

    Buy a good steel and hone the knife on it before you use it, only needs a few strokes.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 24th Jun 19, 10:56 AM
    • 7,053 Posts
    • 5,549 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #8
    • 24th Jun 19, 10:56 AM
    • #8
    • 24th Jun 19, 10:56 AM
    Global or Gustav Emil Ern.
    Donít be a canít, be a can.
    • jimbo6977
    • By jimbo6977 24th Jun 19, 12:03 PM
    • 240 Posts
    • 129 Thanks
    jimbo6977
    • #9
    • 24th Jun 19, 12:03 PM
    • #9
    • 24th Jun 19, 12:03 PM
    Opinel.

    Obvs the traditional wooden handled ones won't go in the dishwasher, but they do make d/w safe versions.
    • daveyjp
    • By daveyjp 24th Jun 19, 12:15 PM
    • 8,146 Posts
    • 6,730 Thanks
    daveyjp
    Another Zwilling owner here. Had them about 20 years, cost £150 for a block of 5, plus steel and scissors. I'll never need to replace them.

    Whilst there are Zwilling blocks for £100 I'd need to see and feel them to see how they compare with a more expensive option.
    • maisie cat
    • By maisie cat 24th Jun 19, 12:35 PM
    • 714 Posts
    • 890 Thanks
    maisie cat
    You don't actually need that many knives, a paring knife, a cooks knife and a bread knife if you slice your own bread are a minimum. I have around 8 Wustof knives bought around 20 years ago, I use 5 of them max and resharpen regularly. I would personally go for the best you can afford and buy the knives you use most first.
    • knightstyle
    • By knightstyle 24th Jun 19, 4:31 PM
    • 5,184 Posts
    • 1,980 Thanks
    knightstyle
    Don't want to be alarmist but it is better to have knives in a drawer, in wooden slots.
    This means they are not on display so if an intruder comes in they are much less likely to be grabbed and used as a weapon.
    • davemorton
    • By davemorton 24th Jun 19, 6:53 PM
    • 27,197 Posts
    • 325,334 Thanks
    davemorton
    Iíve no idea about cheaper ones, sorry, so my suggestion would be to buy good ones over time, and my favorites are Global.

    Get one 17 -20 cm utility knife and something to sharpen it properly with and youíll use that for nearly everything until you want the next one.
    Originally posted by Kentish Dave
    Exactly this!.
    ďQuis custodiet ipsos custodes?Ē
    Juvenal, The Sixteen Satires
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 24th Jun 19, 7:52 PM
    • 8,309 Posts
    • 7,192 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    I've got a mix of cheap and slightly less cheap knives and a knife sharpener. They probably loose their edge quicker than expensive knives but the sharpener is very quick and easy to use. What are you cutting on? I've got friends who cut on glass. slate and marble. Unsurprisingly their knives are blunt.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

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    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 25th Jun 19, 7:12 AM
    • 5,714 Posts
    • 13,191 Thanks
    onomatopoeia99
    I'd agree with everyone that said buy good ones. Even if you only buy one to start with, if you look after it (hand wash in warm soapy water, not let it clatter around the dishwasher, cut on a board that gives rather than something like granite) it will last a long time.

    When I finally got bored of cheap knives that didn't cut a few years ago, and bought a block of Global that were on special, I immediately wondered why I'd waited so long.
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek. Home is where my books are.

    5.2kWp system, SE facing, >1% shading, installed March 2019.
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 25th Jun 19, 8:49 AM
    • 13,502 Posts
    • 9,243 Thanks
    theonlywayisup
    We have Global and they are nearly as old as time itself. I use their sharpener once a week to keep them razor sharp. I have a block of 6 but mostly use the same 3 knives - paring, bread and cleaver.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 25th Jun 19, 2:17 PM
    • 36,633 Posts
    • 22,563 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Learn to hone and sharpen.

    Good stones with something to set the angle
    Steel to touch up.

    A good heavy cleaver is an option you can do a lot with them.
    A longer chefs can cover carving till you feel the need for one.
    A tiny one for peeling stuff that can't be done with a y-peeler.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 26th Jun 19, 1:13 PM
    • 6,591 Posts
    • 7,306 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    I have 3 Flint & Flame knives. 3 1/2" paring knife, 5" Utility and 5 1/2" deep bladed Santoku. They cover the vast majority of my needs. They weren't cheap but are exceptionally sharp. The 'party piece' at the demo was cutting horizontally through a tomato, without holding the tomato in place! I used the 5 1/2" yesterday to remove the skin from a pineapple. Almost no pressure required.

    I store them in the boxes they arrived in as then there is no risk of anybody shoving them in a drawer and suffering the consequences later.
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