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  • FIRST POST
    • Ryanbell94
    • By Ryanbell94 18th Aug 19, 10:23 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Ryanbell94
    Renting my spare bedrooms out to my friends
    • #1
    • 18th Aug 19, 10:23 PM
    Renting my spare bedrooms out to my friends 18th Aug 19 at 10:23 PM
    Hi there Iím currently in the process of buying a house and will have 2 bedrooms spare and was wondering if I asked for my friends to move in with me and we split the mortgage, bills, council tax, boardband between the 3 of us, would I have to pay tax on the money they give me?
    Cheers
Page 2
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 19th Aug 19, 12:17 PM
    • 4,878 Posts
    • 8,277 Thanks
    Smodlet
    how double dare you lol. Dude calm down, I wasn't taking a dig at you.

    ... Still not a dude and don't tell me what to do, you little upstart... LOL; that forgives everything to the text generation, right?

    By their very nature, a landlord living or not living in the house can enter the room for whatever reason they wish. The person doesn't own that room.
    Originally posted by comedyseeker123
    No, they cannot. A tenant has the right to "quiet enjoyment", exclusive occupation and at least 24 hours' notice of inspection. In theory, they cannot refuse access; in practice, they are frequently exhorted to change the locks by, amongst others, many of the LLs who post on this board.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • MoneySeeker1
    • By MoneySeeker1 19th Aug 19, 12:24 PM
    • 130 Posts
    • 236 Thanks
    MoneySeeker1
    I can't emphasise strongly enough to NOT ever use the words "splitting the mortgage" with them or anyone else ever.

    Sometimes friendships end and people can turn out very differently to what you thought they were like.

    Never ever give anyone the chance of an excuse to grab for some of your house equity if it comes to it by saying "Well you said we were 'splitting the mortgage' and so I've paid into this house and own some of it".

    Just treat them the same way you would treat any lodger and apply for "Rent a room" tax relief.
    • Marvel1
    • By Marvel1 19th Aug 19, 12:24 PM
    • 4,358 Posts
    • 4,913 Thanks
    Marvel1
    I wouldn't be happy splitting the mortgage as the house is not mine.
    • comedyseeker123
    • By comedyseeker123 19th Aug 19, 2:08 PM
    • 162 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    comedyseeker123
    I wouldn't be happy splitting the mortgage as the house is not mine.
    Originally posted by Marvel1

    I think the poster was using it as a ball park figure for what to charge.
    • comedyseeker123
    • By comedyseeker123 19th Aug 19, 2:18 PM
    • 162 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    comedyseeker123
    A landlord not living in the property would have zero rights of access unless authorised by the tenant.
    Originally posted by Comms69

    So? Why would a landlord be going into a room anyway? I don't think a lock on the door is put on the door for any other reason for the tenants benefit and legally I don't think it does much.


    Both landlords want their rent to be paid and when this fails, do either side have extra rights? I just don't see what the differences are apart from "landlord entering room..... empty bins"
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 19th Aug 19, 2:27 PM
    • 9,813 Posts
    • 11,744 Thanks
    Comms69
    So? Why would a landlord be going into a room anyway? - I have no idea, perhaps they're stealing jewellery, or knickers, or? I don't know I don't think a lock on the door is put on the door for any other reason for the tenants benefit and legally I don't think it does much.


    Both landlords want their rent to be paid and when this fails, do either side have extra rights? I just don't see what the differences are apart from "landlord entering room..... empty bins"
    Originally posted by comedyseeker123


    Yes a live-in landlord doesn't require a court order to evict, a live out landlord does.


    If the basics of tenancy laws are confusing G_M has a sticky on the main sub-forum
    • mattvolatile
    • By mattvolatile 19th Aug 19, 2:30 PM
    • 95 Posts
    • 92 Thanks
    mattvolatile
    By their very nature, a landlord living or not living in the house can enter the room for whatever reason they wish.
    Originally posted by comedyseeker123
    I mean... this is 100% not true at all. I think you should probably refrain from commenting on this kind of thread of you don't understand even the basic principles of tenancy law
    • comedyseeker123
    • By comedyseeker123 19th Aug 19, 3:46 PM
    • 162 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    comedyseeker123
    I mean... this is 100% not true at all. I think you should probably refrain from commenting on this kind of thread of you don't understand even the basic principles of tenancy law
    Originally posted by mattvolatile

    It is true. If the landlord wants to do maintance on the rooms and conduct checks, they are entitled to do so, as long as the tenancy states it, and all of mine have done.
    • Honeylife
    • By Honeylife 20th Aug 19, 9:49 AM
    • 191 Posts
    • 247 Thanks
    Honeylife
    First, you must understand that a Tenant is COMPLETELY different to a Lodger! The latter lives with the Landlord, ie Live in Landlord or Resident Landlord is the terminology.

    A Licence Agreement (or Lodgers Agreement) does not grant a tenancy, merely a licence to occupy and is excluded under Section 3A(2) of the Protection from Eviction Act 1977. This is one of the key differences.

    Second there is a wealth of information on Google about having a Lodger under the Rent a Room scheme.

    Third, G_M sticky is excellent as is https://www.spareroom.co.uk/ AND http://lodgersite.com/

    Fourth, You can do a Search on these Forums for the many discussions on this topic to read viewpoints from several of us Resident Landlords.

    The Lock on the Lodgers Bedroom Door thing really seems to get some people going either way. If you have one lodger, they probably wont mind, but if you have two then perhaps one or other feel that the other lodger may be snooping around their Penthouse magazines room when they are not around. I sympathise there.

    However, as someone who has now had two lodgers for several years, of both genders, this has never ever been an issue. The only locks on the doors in this house are my bedroom and study! All rooms have night latches. The lodgers would have also had access to my adult children's rooms. However recently (three months ago) after much thought I put safes (slim ones that are big enough for a laptop) in each of the lodgers room fixing them to the floor of the built-in wardrobes.

    It is also written in the Agreement that they are not allowed to put any locks/bolts on the doors included the inside. I will never ever put locks on the bedroom doors and inform all viewers of this. If they don't like it they don't take it.

    If a potential viewer wants Privacy then they should really look at a Tenancy or an HMO without a Resident landlord.

    The vast majority of us Resident Landlords do not snoop around the lodgers rooms, we really are only interested that its kept in reasonable condition. I go into the lodgers rooms to close the windows when it rains, bleed the radiator, or if they are on holiday to unplug the electrics. I don't even empty the bins as in my book it is not an Airbnb/hotel I am not a chambermaid!
    Last edited by Honeylife; 20-08-2019 at 11:22 AM.
    "... during that time you must never succumb to buying an extra piece of bread for the table or a toy for a child, no." the Pawnbroker 1964
    • comedyseeker123
    • By comedyseeker123 20th Aug 19, 9:55 AM
    • 162 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    comedyseeker123
    First, you must understand that a Tenant is COMPLETELY different to a Lodger! The latter lives with the Landlord, ie Live in Landlord or Resident Landlord is the terminology.

    A Licence Agreement (or Lodgers Agreement) does not grant a tenancy, merely a licence to occupy and is excluded under Section 3A(2) of the Protection from Eviction Act 1977. This is one of the key differences.

    Second there is a wealth of information on Google about having a Lodger under the Rent a Room scheme.

    Third, G_M sticky is excellent as is https://www.spareroom.co.uk/ AND http://lodgersite.com/

    Fourth, You can do a Search on these Forums for the many discussions on this topic to read viewpoints from several of us Resident Landlords.

    The Lock on the Lodgers Bedroom Door thing really seems to get some people going either way. If you have one lodger, they probably wont complain, but if you have two then perhaps one or other feel that the other lodger may be snooping around their Penthouse magazines room when they are not around. I sympathise there.

    However, as someone who has now had two lodgers for several years, of both genders, this has never ever been an issue. The only locks on the doors in this house are my bedroom and study! All rooms have night latches. The lodgers would have also had access to my adult children's rooms. However recently (three months ago) after much thought I put safes (slim ones that are big enough for a laptop) in each of the lodgers room fixing them to the floor of the built-in wardrobes.

    It is also written in the Agreement that they are not allowed to put any locks/bolts on the doors included the inside. I will never ever put locks on the bedroom doors and inform all viewers of this. If they don't like it they don't take it.

    If a potential viewer wants Privacy then they should really look at a Tenancy or an HMO without a Resident landlord.

    The vast majority of us Resident Landlords do not snoop around the lodgers rooms, we really are only interested that its kept in reasonable condition. I go into the lodgers rooms to close the windows when it rains, bleed the radiator, or if they are on holiday to unplug the electrics. I don't even empty the bins as in my book it is not an Airbnb/hotel I am not a chambermaid!
    Originally posted by Honeylife
    On a personal level why don't you want locks on the door? If you have a key, what's the issue?
    Just for reference for 8 years I was renting and renting out rooms and I didn't have locks. However now im in a HMO I would get inside locks for rooms. The last house I was as a lodger, one of the other lodgers went into my room on a regular basis because he was an alcoholic. I will be getting inside locks on rooms in my house.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 20th Aug 19, 10:19 AM
    • 2,933 Posts
    • 3,917 Thanks
    FreeBear
    The Lock on the Lodgers Bedroom Door thing really seems to get some people going either way. If you have one lodger, they probably wont complain, but if you have two then perhaps one or other feel that the other lodger may be snooping around their Penthouse magazines room when they are not around. I sympathise there.
    Originally posted by Honeylife
    I don't have locks on interal doors, nor would I allow them to be fitted. There are thumb latches on bedroom & bathroom doors if the lodgers have any privacy concerns. With my current two lodgers, we trust and respect each others space, property, & privacy and locks have never been mentioned. With the previous couple, a lock on the drinks cabinet would have been a good idea, but they got their marching orders once I clocked the wine disappearing.

    If there is mutual trust and respect between the lodger(s) and landlord, then locks shouldn't be needed. If there is no trust, then get a different lodger.
    Her courage will change the world.

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    • Honeylife
    • By Honeylife 22nd Aug 19, 11:08 AM
    • 191 Posts
    • 247 Thanks
    Honeylife
    On a personal level why don't you want locks on the door? If you have a key, what's the issue?
    Just for reference for 8 years I was renting and renting out rooms and I didn't have locks. However now im in a HMO I would get inside locks for rooms. The last house I was as a lodger, one of the other lodgers went into my room on a regular basis because he was an alcoholic. I will be getting inside locks on rooms in my house.
    Originally posted by comedyseeker123
    Have visions of me with a Chatelaine of house keys swinging from my hips!!
    No we were advised years ago of the slightest possibility of creating a tenancy and that the Lodger could then change the lock, so we didn't think it was worth it.

    I have had people who want locks on doors. I have said no and they didn't take the room. End of. Next...

    When the local Fire Officer came over he actually said it was safer to have no locks on the internal doors as far too often people do not have thumb locks but regular key locks and lock themselves in their rooms - not a good move!
    Last edited by Honeylife; 22-08-2019 at 11:14 AM.
    "... during that time you must never succumb to buying an extra piece of bread for the table or a toy for a child, no." the Pawnbroker 1964
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