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    • singingsister
    • By singingsister 14th Oct 19, 10:01 PM
    • 473Posts
    • 67Thanks
    singingsister
    Getting a pet mid tenancy
    • #1
    • 14th Oct 19, 10:01 PM
    Getting a pet mid tenancy 14th Oct 19 at 10:01 PM
    Hi everyone,

    We've lived in our current property (rented) for 5 years now.

    We've decided we'd love to get a little doggie to join our family.

    Obviously we want permission from our landlord, however a few years ago, we got 2 guinea pigs and he wanted "confirmation" that they were only going to be in the cage! We had no pet related (or any other infact!) problems and we now want to word an email to him asking him for permission to get a little dog.

    We know we can only have a little one as we live in a townhouse with a shared (massive) communal garden so we are not looking outside our means.

    We want to email our landlord asking permission to actually get a dog however I'm unsure how to word the email.

    I get he is concerned about the condition of his property and I understand that. However, as I've said we have lived here 5 years with no problems at all.

    Lots of other identical properties on our road also have dogs so we don't have a problem getting a home visit approved before getting a particular dog.

    We are happy to pay some kind of "doggie deposit" so should the dog cause any problems the landlord has some money set aside.

    We are 2 or 3 months into our 5th years rental agreement so I'm not sure how to go about getting this approved.

    There are also medical reasons why we want to get a dog (no need to explain them here).

    Does anyone have any suggestions of how to move forward on this? I've tried googling about a "doggie deposit" but they all talk about a landlord letting to a new tenant, I can't seem to find anything about what to do mid tenancy, or if indeed a "doggie deposit" is still legal since the tenancy laws recently changed.

    Does anyone have any suggestions or advise for us?
Page 2
    • tom9980
    • By tom9980 15th Oct 19, 9:13 AM
    • 1,521 Posts
    • 4,237 Thanks
    tom9980
    These answers are why I thank the lord I was lucky enough to be able to buy my own home.

    The level of control landlords think is reasonable to have over their tenants lives is insane.
    Originally posted by onwards&upwards
    The problem we have is that this is not Germany, if I as a Landlord only had to provide a shell and the tenant was responsible for everything internal including fixtures and fittings then I would be very happy indeed and accept less rent and secure tenancy agreements. Unfortunately we live in the UK where expectations and responsibility seem to be far lower, many tenants seem clueless to their responsibilities and unfortunately there is a not insignificant number of Landlords who are the same.
    Last edited by tom9980; 15-10-2019 at 10:48 AM.
    In order to change, we must be sick and tired of being sick and tired.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 15th Oct 19, 10:49 AM
    • 16,204 Posts
    • 19,441 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    The unintended consequences of the new deposit rules are Landlords even less likely to accept pets in their properties, tenants should expect to pay higher rents instead to compensate for the near certainty that their pets will cause some damage to the Landlords property.
    Originally posted by tom9980

    Add to that, if many tenants start enforcing their rights by coming in without a pet and then adding one as its "their right", LL's might start proactively raising rents to allow for that responsibility. Or perhaps they could proactively cater for that in the agreement, eg rent without cat or dog* x a month or x+500 a month with.

    Similar as the bar in ? Boston? that charges $200 for chips and salsa because they are legally obliged to offer food. And no one is going to order food at that price.


    * I do think LL's need to be more specific about what they specify, "no pets" rules out a great dane or a goldfish equally.
    Please dont criticise my spelling. It's excellent. Its my typing that's bad.
    • Crumble2018
    • By Crumble2018 15th Oct 19, 10:59 AM
    • 169 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    Crumble2018
    * I do think LL's need to be more specific about what they specify, "no pets" rules out a great dane or a goldfish equally.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe

    This. We have 3 guinea pigs - they are kept in a pen, and don't have any contact with the property. Yet still we struggled to find a single property earlier this year that would accept them. Which is frankly ridiculous. Thankfully we are buying now, so wont have this battle anymore.


    If I were a landlord, I'd take a dog over children any day!!
    • EmmyLou30
    • By EmmyLou30 15th Oct 19, 11:01 AM
    • 509 Posts
    • 639 Thanks
    EmmyLou30
    Given that the government in their infinite wisdom have stopped landlords taking a pet deposit, it's likely rents will go up to cover the cost of pets if you want one to be sure they can rectify the damage they cause. As another poster said, dogs have the potential to wreck houses. So don't be surprised that a landlord isn't likely to want pets in his/her house.


    When you own your own home then do as you please of course. I'm still unsure as to why any tenant would want to limit their ability to find another rental in the future by having a dog or cat (plus as this is MSE; spend money on a pet that could be saved for a house deposit).


    To the OP, by all means ask but given the response to the guinea pigs I wouldn't get your hopes up.
    • Crumble2018
    • By Crumble2018 15th Oct 19, 11:11 AM
    • 169 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    Crumble2018
    I'm still unsure as to why any tenant would want to limit their ability to find another rental in the future by having a dog or cat (plus as this is MSE; spend money on a pet that could be saved for a house deposit).
    Originally posted by EmmyLou30

    Because for some people, their pets are their family, and sometimes their lifeline.
    • newsgroup_monkey
    • By newsgroup_monkey 15th Oct 19, 12:06 PM
    • 805 Posts
    • 982 Thanks
    newsgroup_monkey
    Given that the government in their infinite wisdom have stopped landlords taking a pet deposit, it's likely rents will go up to cover the cost of pets if you want one to be sure they can rectify the damage they cause. As another poster said, dogs have the potential to wreck houses. So don't be surprised that a landlord isn't likely to want pets in his/her house.
    Originally posted by EmmyLou30

    Nail >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Head


    Whilst I totally understand why the Government had to step in to stop some of the ridiculous long-term rental contracts that effectively meant that tenants could pay 50 a month to live in a 4 bedroom house (probably an exaggeration, but you get my point) the flip side means that there are few, if any, long-term rentals around.


    We've been in our current rental for 6 years and possibly would have stayed another 4. We would almost certainly have been prepared to take on the "shell" contract right at the beginning. Unfortunately, whilst we've been breaking even with little debt, we've not been in a position until now to buy. It's an annoyance, because effectively, we've proved over the last 13 years of never having missed a rental payment, that we'd be great for a mortgage.


    And before anyone mentions downsizing or cutting down, there is an element here of personal pride here. Me and my current wife had downsized and started putting >500 a month away to look to buy. However, only a couple of months in, my ex-wife died suddenly and the kids came to live with us. Where we lived wasn't appropriate and we had to upsize again. Not only did this cost more, but clearly, it wasn't fair on the kids going without just so that we could buy our own house. We made a decision to bring the kids up whilst budgeting sensibly. Kids have now moved out, hence why we're now in a position to buy.


    Going back to the original point, we'd have loved to rent a shell rather than being responsible for fixtures and fittings we would never have picked, whilst having ridiculous clauses like saying that bins must be hidden unless being collected and that I wasn't allowed to work on my car outside the house
    The smaller the monkey the more it looks like it would kill you at the first given opportunity.

    • Yalpsmol
    • By Yalpsmol 15th Oct 19, 12:23 PM
    • 201 Posts
    • 224 Thanks
    Yalpsmol
    I have a dog. And I would sooner be homeless than live without her.

    But if I was a landlord under current rules I wouldnt allow dogs. 5 weeks isnt a big enough deposit to protect against the damage a dog can do.

    My dog was fine for 6 years before she suddenly developed severe seperation anxiety (I had to get a new job and she had to take medication to stop her self mutilating and all sorts to semi resolve this). It relieved a lot of my anxiety that it was only my doors and windows she was scratching and eating, etc.

    I would hold off until you can buy and get the ideal dog for you.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 15th Oct 19, 12:37 PM
    • 33,859 Posts
    • 68,190 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    Add to that, if many tenants start enforcing their rights by coming in without a pet and then adding one as its "their right", LL's might start proactively raising rents to allow for that responsibility. Or perhaps they could proactively cater for that in the agreement, eg rent without cat or dog* x a month or x+500 a month with.

    Similar as the bar in ? Boston? that charges $200 for chips and salsa because they are legally obliged to offer food. And no one is going to order food at that price.


    * I do think LL's need to be more specific about what they specify, "no pets" rules out a great dane or a goldfish equally.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    Which is why the tenancy agreement my tenants have always had, says 'pets negotiable'.
    Member #10 of 2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 15th Oct 19, 1:41 PM
    • 6,795 Posts
    • 10,819 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    We have pets in our rentals. But we have very long rentals. A lot longer than 5 years so we would expect to have to do some work to a house when the tenants leave.



    The problem here is that the house is probably in very good condition inside. The kitchen, decorations, doors and skirting boards that the landlord paid for in buying the house could be damaged to the extend that the house if sold would have to be sold as one needing doing up and so not only damaged but significantly reduced in value without a small fortune being spent on it.



    I can quite understand why the landlord might say no.



    I would suggest that if you want to get a dog move and find a landlord that accepts pets. You might have to pay more rent or you might have to accept a not quite such nice house.
    • BarryBlue
    • By BarryBlue 15th Oct 19, 1:45 PM
    • 3,746 Posts
    • 12,688 Thanks
    BarryBlue
    At the beginning of tenancies as a LL I make it clear the property is not accommodating of pets.

    That view wouldn't change if I were faced with a tenants request whether they were long standing tenants or not.

    By all means contact your LL with a brief request but be prepared for the potential that the answer is no.

    A LL cant take an extra pet deposit anymore.That was one of the charges banned in the recent change in charging.

    Ultimately it is the decision of the LL whether to accept pets or not.
    If you wish to continue your idea of a dog going forward you may need to consider finding a LL who allows them.
    Originally posted by need an answer
    There is a proviso in that. In many cases the lease will expressly prohibit the keeping of pets. From memory all my BTL properties have that, so it is always in the tenancy agreement. It is perfectly understandable as in a small apartment block you don't need barking dogs and you don't want them doing their business on the grounds.

    I wouldn't want cats or dogs in my properties anyway, but if it's in the lease it saves any arguments.
    We're gonna be alright, dancin' on a Saturday night
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 15th Oct 19, 1:58 PM
    • 2,282 Posts
    • 2,753 Thanks
    need an answer
    There is a proviso in that. In many cases the lease will expressly prohibit the keeping of pets. From memory all my BTL properties have that, so it is always in the tenancy agreement. It is perfectly understandable as in a small apartment block you don't need barking dogs and you don't want them doing their business on the grounds.

    I wouldn't want cats or dogs in my properties anyway, but if it's in the lease it saves any arguments.
    Originally posted by BarryBlue
    I agree,I have several leasehold properties that all have either a no pet policy or only once registered after paying a fee.

    However I have a freehold house where it is my choice not to allow pets.

    My comments were made with the assumption that the OP was renting a property that was not covered by a lease restriction.

    Just because a property is BTL doesn't mean it will automatically have a lease restriction
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