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  • FIRST POST
    • furndire
    • By furndire 14th Jun 19, 9:21 PM
    • 7,171Posts
    • 31,470Thanks
    furndire
    Boiler not working in rented property
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 19, 9:21 PM
    Boiler not working in rented property 14th Jun 19 at 9:21 PM
    My grandaughter and her boyfriend are sharing a house. The boiler has not been working for 4 weeks. The landlord has had gas engineers looking at it - they say it’s obsolete and needs replacing. Landlord is insisting on get more engineers round to repair it. They’ve only lived there 6 months and this is the second time the boiler has packed up.
    Advice needed please
Page 2
    • bris
    • By bris 15th Jun 19, 8:24 PM
    • 8,816 Posts
    • 7,706 Thanks
    bris
    What's the make and model of the boiler, I will tell you if it's obsolete or not.


    A lot of engineers want to sell boilers so you can't trust one engineer as they are possibly looking for a bigger sale.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 15th Jun 19, 9:44 PM
    • 1,380 Posts
    • 1,286 Thanks
    lookstraightahead
    All of our energy on here and you and your granddaughter because of a lazy penny pinching landlord.
    • markin
    • By markin 16th Jun 19, 7:19 PM
    • 846 Posts
    • 692 Thanks
    markin
    How about there's a leak in the roof that you own (or that you are the landlord of). You want more than one quote to put it right. The tenant isn't about to let people in. Do you just let it go on for months or do you, as a landlord, feel a sense of urgency because it's going to affect you one way or another?

    Landlords react differentlt depending on sho us going to suffer.
    Originally posted by lookstraightahead



    Thats a terrible example, they don't need a key to get on the roof. And in an emergency the LA,LL can just let themselves in.


    This isn't an emergency, but it should be easier to arrange a key in less than a month.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 16th Jun 19, 8:21 PM
    • 1,380 Posts
    • 1,286 Thanks
    lookstraightahead
    Thats a terrible example, they don't need a key to get on the roof. And in an emergency the LA,LL can just let themselves in.


    This isn't an emergency, but it should be easier to arrange a key in less than a month.
    Originally posted by markin
    Ok maybe a bad example. But you can bet that if there was something going on in the house (slow leak maybe) that the landlord would get it fixed quickly as it will affect them. This just puts the tenant out so there's no rush.
    • antilles
    • By antilles 16th Jun 19, 8:35 PM
    • 353 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    antilles
    I had a boiler stop working in 2017. It was 2 years old and had been fitted about a year before I bought the house. Called an engineer (recommended by a friend) to look at it. They told me the boiler and the storage tank needed replacing due to corrosion and the tank was about to burst. Quoted me 3.5K for the work - when I balked at the price they immediately dropped 1K from the quote. Said I'd think about it.

    Called another engineer for a second opinion. He diagnosed a buildup of dirt on a sensor - cleaned the sensor and everything starting working again. Said system was in good working order - no sign of corrosion. Cost: £60. Been working great ever since and a different engineer has serviced it and confirmed good working order and good condition.

    The first guy (3.5K quote) had hundreds of 5 star review on Trustatrader and Google. Can't always trust people or reviews.

    Landlord is right to get a second quote. What is odd is that things are taking so long - however it sounds like there is some story regarding missed appointments or engineers not calling ahead. All sounds a bit vague.

    Could someone else wait in? Would the Landlord be prepared to wait in the property if the tenants can't be there? Where do they work? Can they not get time off to wait in - surely having hot water and heating is important? Not criticising here as I have no idea what they do or why they can't get the time off - just wondering why they can't wait in.

    Hope you get it sorted soon.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 17th Jun 19, 7:16 AM
    • 1,380 Posts
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    lookstraightahead
    Antilles lots of common sense there, but at the end of the day the landlord appears to not be bothered. They are in no rush and it doesn't look as if they will put themselves out. It's not like it happened yesterday.
    • anselld
    • By anselld 17th Jun 19, 7:25 AM
    • 6,428 Posts
    • 6,369 Thanks
    anselld
    Antilles lots of common sense there, but at the end of the day the landlord appears to not be bothered. They are in no rush and it doesn't look as if they will put themselves out. It's not like it happened yesterday.
    Originally posted by lookstraightahead
    Its a two way street. L probably feels the same about Ts who cannot arrange to let the gas man in.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 17th Jun 19, 7:37 AM
    • 24,836 Posts
    • 24,213 Thanks
    AdrianC
    I am a trtadesman (electrician) and I do a lot of work in rental properties.

    If the tenants can't be in during the day, then it is very common for an arrangement for me to be given a key to go and do the work while the tenants are out.

    Why can't they do that? The LL will have a key, he can give that to the gas man if the tenants agree to that.
    Originally posted by ProDave
    They will do that. Problem has been that tradesmen have made arrangements to call round but failed to turn up. Or go round without making arrangement to call.

    They are living on a shoestring and cannot afford to take time off other than their work days off which they’ve already made arrangements.
    Originally posted by furndire
    So all they need to do is say to the agent "We can't be about - but we're happy for the plumber to visit whenever - pass them a key." - job jobbed.

    Then it simply doesn't matter whether the tenants are in or not...
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 17th Jun 19, 10:11 PM
    • 1,380 Posts
    • 1,286 Thanks
    lookstraightahead
    What would the landlord do if the tenant was away for a few weeks?
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 18th Jun 19, 7:36 AM
    • 2,194 Posts
    • 2,633 Thanks
    need an answer
    What would the landlord do if the tenant was away for a few weeks?
    Originally posted by lookstraightahead
    probably be able to gain access and fix the boiler properly,but only if the tenant told the LL they were going away and were happy for the fix to happen in their absence.

    If the tenant doesn't tell the LL that they are away then no the LL can do nothing,they cant enter the property without notice unless it is an emergency

    It becomes a bit of a catch 22 if the tenant wont allow access the LL is unable to fix

    Surely the tenant needs to co operate to some level to allow the fix/replacement/whatever to take place.

    It does sound as if the LL could be more proactive with getting people to look at the boiler,but in the same turn if the tenant wont take time off or at least allow a key to be issued they are not helping the situation either.


    Hopefully if the tenant were going on a long holiday and needed to advise the LL of their extended break in line with any tenancy/insurance requirement they could come to an agreement about the boiler being fixed whilst they were away

    I've yet to meet a heating engineer who can fix boilers remotely without accessing the property,I'm sure if there were some they would be worth their weight in gold,until then the tenant if they want something investigating will need to allow some form of access.
    Last edited by need an answer; 18-06-2019 at 8:07 AM.
    in S 46 T 16 F 43
    out S 39 T 14 F 58
    2017 -32 2018 -33
    • lisyloo
    • By lisyloo 18th Jun 19, 7:43 AM
    • 25,441 Posts
    • 13,643 Thanks
    lisyloo
    Would one of them be able to return on a lunchtime to give access?

    Is there a retired neighbour or stay at home mum who could take a key?

    Can the agent help? My agent lets people in if we can’t make it.

    If no other options are available the there are commercial key holders e.g. shops who will look after the key for a fee.

    This is not impossible, just need some organisation and communication.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 18th Jun 19, 8:08 AM
    • 9,927 Posts
    • 11,927 Thanks
    Comms69
    What would the landlord do if the tenant was away for a few weeks?
    Originally posted by lookstraightahead


    Probably nothing?


    You're acting as if the LL is somehow to blame for this?


    Clearly there is a breakdown in communication - probably because of the agent.


    Alternatively, they can just move.
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