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  • FIRST POST
    • autopilot
    • By autopilot 13th Jun 19, 11:49 AM
    • 19Posts
    • 6Thanks
    autopilot
    Advised to buy part for faulty appliance. Turns out it was not what I needed. What are my rights?
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 19, 11:49 AM
    Advised to buy part for faulty appliance. Turns out it was not what I needed. What are my rights? 13th Jun 19 at 11:49 AM
    I have a Bosch dryer which developed a fault out of warranty. It stopped working and just came up with an error code on the screen. I could not find the code online, so called the Bosch help line.

    The person on the phone put me on hold to speak to a colleague, then came back and told me the code indicated a control board fault, and gave me a price (either with an engineer visit, or without). A few weeks later I called back and ordered the part they advised I needed.

    Upon fitting the part, the same error code came up. So obviously the fault it being caused by something else, and the part I was advised to buy was not what is required.

    I called them back and they flat out refuse to take the part back for a refund, because it’s now ‘used’. When asked why I was advised to buy that part and if they took any responsibility for that, they stating they are ‘not engineers’ although I’m not sure how that is really my problem and really changes anything.

    What is the law here? Do I have any right to a refund?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by autopilot; 13-06-2019 at 11:59 AM.
Page 1
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 13th Jun 19, 12:55 PM
    • 29,464 Posts
    • 12,112 Thanks
    forgotmyname
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 12:55 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 12:55 PM
    As they had not tested it they simply told you what the code showed in their handbook.

    The code relates to a control board fault, but without further tests to see if something else was causing that fault then nobody is any closer to the cure.

    The problem is the original board may have been faulty due to another fault. The new board may also be faulty if the original fault killed it.


    I doubt they said 100% its the board and a new one will fix it. They said the code in the book shows a board fault.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • autopilot
    • By autopilot 13th Jun 19, 1:30 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    autopilot
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 1:30 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 1:30 PM
    As they had not tested it they simply told you what the code showed in their handbook.

    The code relates to a control board fault, but without further tests to see if something else was causing that fault then nobody is any closer to the cure.

    The problem is the original board may have been faulty due to another fault. The new board may also be faulty if the original fault killed it.


    I doubt they said 100% its the board and a new one will fix it. They said the code in the book shows a board fault.
    Originally posted by forgotmyname
    Thanks for replying.

    No, they didn’t say this ‘will 100% fix it’. No more than anyone selling any product would say it would ‘work 100%’. If I bought a TV, I’m sure them not saying ‘this will work 100%’ would negate any rights. But I did make the purchase on their advice that this was the part required.

    Also, if some thing else killed it, is the onus on me? If I bought a new fridge that didn’t work, could the seller say ‘well it could have been caused by your homes electrics’ and refuse a deal with the issue?

    So, in short, they can wash their hands of this and take no responsibility for their advice? I have no rights, under the consumer rights act or any other legislation, to return for a refund it in these circumstances?
    • wesleyad
    • By wesleyad 13th Jun 19, 1:40 PM
    • 585 Posts
    • 571 Thanks
    wesleyad
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 1:40 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 1:40 PM
    Yes you have rights, they cannot refuse a refund (unless its for hygiene reasons eg worn knickers), but they can offer a pro rata refund for use. I find it hard to believe installing it a circuit board would have any effect on "use" and so you should get near enough a 100% refund. You will have to pay for return shipping as it's effectively a "change of mind" rather than a faulty product.
    • autopilot
    • By autopilot 13th Jun 19, 1:54 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    autopilot
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 1:54 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 1:54 PM
    Yes you have rights, they cannot refuse a refund (unless its for hygiene reasons eg worn knickers), but they can offer a pro rata refund for use. I find it hard to believe installing it a circuit board would have any effect on "use" and so you should get near enough a 100% refund. You will have to pay for return shipping as it's effectively a "change of mind" rather than a faulty product.
    Originally posted by wesleyad
    Would it not come under it being ‘not fit for the purpose described’ (or whatever the exact wording is)?
  • archived user
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:08 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:08 PM
    Why did you not just get a repairman out, they tend to work with sale or return basis with most of the spares suppliers but that aside it would potentially have saved you the hassle you are now experiencing
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 13th Jun 19, 2:36 PM
    • 7,922 Posts
    • 7,748 Thanks
    DoaM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:36 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:36 PM
    Would it not come under it being ‘not fit for the purpose described’ (or whatever the exact wording is)?
    Originally posted by autopilot
    No. It is fit for the intended purpose, but it doesn't work because of something else.
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    • autopilot
    • By autopilot 13th Jun 19, 2:40 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    autopilot
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:40 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:40 PM
    Why did you not just get a repairman out, they tend to work with sale or return basis with most of the spares suppliers but that aside it would potentially have saved you the hassle you are now experiencing
    Originally posted by Simonr66
    Because it was a £100 call out fee. I didn’t want to pay someone all that money to remove 3 screws and unplug something, which I can do myself in about 3 minutes.

    But this is besides my point, I’m asking for advice on returning an item (which I’ve never had problems with before).
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 13th Jun 19, 2:55 PM
    • 29,464 Posts
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    forgotmyname
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:55 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 19, 2:55 PM
    Not just 3 screws though and if the original fault damaged that board then you may not get a refund.

    You need to fault find which is what your paying that money for. If you dont have the skill then you need to pay someone that does.

    Im fairly handy with a lot of things, but there will always be jobs i have to pay others to do. I would not paint a car, rip the engine out yes but not paint one. I wont tile a room either. A pro could do a better job in a fraction of the time i would take.

    Sometimes you need to pay.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • autopilot
    • By autopilot 13th Jun 19, 2:56 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    autopilot
    No. It is fit for the intended purpose, but it doesn't work because of something else.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    Ok. So going back to simply not wanting it, can it not be returned for a refund (with the cost of return covered by myself) if it’s been tried?

    I was under the impression it could be after reading this - https://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/advice/i-want-to-return-something-bought-online
    • cajef
    • By cajef 13th Jun 19, 3:02 PM
    • 5,055 Posts
    • 4,112 Thanks
    cajef
    You have used that board there is no guarantee that it is still servicable, they are probably just the spares department and as stated are not engineers.

    I doubt they have the facilities to test that board to make sure it is still working and can be put back into stock, it is now second hand so they cannot sell it as new.
    Last edited by cajef; 13-06-2019 at 3:08 PM.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • stragglebod
    • By stragglebod 13th Jun 19, 9:48 PM
    • 819 Posts
    • 740 Thanks
    stragglebod
    No. It is fit for the intended purpose, but it doesn't work because of something else.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    Is it though? It's purpose was to solve the 'error code xxxx' problem, and it failed to do so.


    From MSE's own guide
    Say you buy some new car headlights without checking which car they're for – if you get the wrong ones, that doesn't make them faulty. Yet if you get them having asked the shopkeeper if they'd work in your car – even though the box didn't say yes or no – then they aren't 'fit for purpose' and you can get your money back.
    • Jumblebumble
    • By Jumblebumble 14th Jun 19, 1:20 PM
    • 351 Posts
    • 126 Thanks
    Jumblebumble
    Yes you have rights, they cannot refuse a refund (unless its for hygiene reasons eg worn knickers), but they can offer a pro rata refund for use. I find it hard to believe installing it a circuit board would have any effect on "use" and so you should get near enough a 100% refund. You will have to pay for return shipping as it's effectively a "change of mind" rather than a faulty product.
    Originally posted by wesleyad
    How do you know that the fault on the machine has not fried the electronics of the replacement board ?
    Quick answer is you don't and I doubt that Bosch would want to send that board out to anyone else
    Please enlighten us on the legislation which mandates that Bosch have to accept the board and refund anything
    Last edited by Jumblebumble; 14-06-2019 at 1:23 PM.
    • Jumblebumble
    • By Jumblebumble 14th Jun 19, 1:24 PM
    • 351 Posts
    • 126 Thanks
    Jumblebumble
    How do you know that the fault on the machine has not fried the electronics of the replacement board ?
    Quick answer is you don't and I doubt that Bosch would want to send that board out to anyone else
    Please enlighten us on the legislation which mandates that Bosch have to accept the board and refund anything
    Originally posted by Jumblebumble
    Also you did not want to pay an engineer £100 to undo 3 screws but actually you would likely have been paying him to fix your machine which you were not able to do.
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