Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Lucia
    • By MSE Lucia 3rd Nov 16, 5:13 PM
    • 10Posts
    • 6Thanks
    MSE Lucia
    Have you suffered from not having a will? Tell us
    • #1
    • 3rd Nov 16, 5:13 PM
    Have you suffered from not having a will? Tell us 3rd Nov 16 at 5:13 PM
    Hi everyone,

    We’d really like to hear from any Forumites who have experienced the effects that not having a will can cause. If you’re happy to share your story, please post in the thread below. If you’ve seen any relevant threads or posts elsewhere on the forum, please do share the links.

    We’re looking to do a feature highlighting that whatever your age, if you've assets eg, a house, savings, or a business, and people or others you'd like to look after it, you should consider making a will; and Will Aid month gives you a chance to do it cheaply.

    Our feature will be in line with Will Aid month, which is a UK-wide scheme that runs every November, where the charity Will Aid teams up with over 900 solicitors to provide basic wills to people of any age. There's no set fee but Will Aid hopes you'll make a donation of around £95 for a single will (£150 for a couple). This is a good price for a solicitor-drafted will but of course if you can’t afford it, you can give less.

    Huge thanks,
    MSE Lucia
    Last edited by Former MSE Matt; 04-11-2016 at 9:04 AM.
Page 3
    • tick1986
    • By tick1986 24th Mar 18, 9:58 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    tick1986
    My nan passed away thinking she had a will and all in order. Turns out her maiden name was on the will. We have been told that even though we have her marriage certificate that the will is not valid. My mum had a brother and sister who passed away young. So she has been solely caring for both her parents who has now sadly passed away.


    Her brother, my uncle, had a child who my nan had not seen in about 20 years (didn't even turn up for her funeral) who now stands to inherit half their estate.


    Ridiculous!!
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 24th Mar 18, 10:59 AM
    • 30,225 Posts
    • 77,685 Thanks
    Mojisola
    My nan passed away thinking she had a will and all in order. Turns out her maiden name was on the will. We have been told that even though we have her marriage certificate that the will is not valid.
    Originally posted by tick1986
    It isn't because her maiden name is on the will - marriage automatically revokes any will previously made (unless made 'in contemplation of marriage').
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 24th Mar 18, 1:43 PM
    • 2,390 Posts
    • 3,638 Thanks
    badmemory
    My nan passed away thinking she had a will and all in order. Turns out her maiden name was on the will. We have been told that even though we have her marriage certificate that the will is not valid. My mum had a brother and sister who passed away young. So she has been solely caring for both her parents who has now sadly passed away.


    Her brother, my uncle, had a child who my nan had not seen in about 20 years (didn't even turn up for her funeral) who now stands to inherit half their estate.


    Ridiculous!!
    Originally posted by tick1986
    This should serve as a reminder to us all to regularly review & update our wills. We can't just write a will & decide that's it - done & dusted permanently.
    • Syntax753
    • By Syntax753 1st May 18, 4:23 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Syntax753
    20 years is roughly how long it was between the time I left home at 16 and my father died.

    In the meantime, I was cut out of my grandparents will as I had been out of contact and when my father died, the family shared the inheritance between them. However, they got in touch with me as I remained the last male to carry the surname of the family tree and as such I inherited the debts that my father had accumulated (25k).

    I didn't retaliate by disputing their sharing of the wealth, but instead had to battle to prove that I should not be considered part of the family for which I proved he wasn't my real father and that I'd left young enough to be considered not part of the family.

    I wish he'd had a will because he would certainly have left me out of it which at least would have stopped the family trying to pull this despicable selfish move on me.

    I've made a point of always leaving everything to my first love - and am clear about that in any relationship. That has caused rows of course, but generally those rows are good indications that the relationship is not what it may seem.

    Arguing my will whilst I'm alive is not a relationship for me. Spend the money you have with the people you love most. And leave the rest to those you respect the most.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 18th Sep 18, 7:17 PM
    • 5,655 Posts
    • 4,311 Thanks
    sheramber
    Make sure your will makes provision for the care of any children.

    My neighbour's brother and his wife were killed when the plane they were travelling in crashed. Their baby was at home with a nanny.

    My neighbour and her father immediately travelled to South Africa- where her brother and his family had been living.

    The mother's sister also travelled to SA. She arrived first and claimed the child.

    My neighbour's family were not happy about this as the sister and her husband had been about to divorce but now said they were no longer to divorce. She took the child back to England.

    My neighbour's family spent tens of thousands of pounds on lawyers and even a QC to fight for custody but by the time the case was finished the child had been with the sister for 2 years and the judgement was that it was not the child's interest to change things now.

    A provision for the future care of the child would have avoided a lot of stress and bad feeling and avoided a lot of expense.
    • easyhomevacuum
    • By easyhomevacuum 5th Oct 18, 5:06 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    easyhomevacuum
    If he dies first then I will make a will, but with an 18 year age difference that's unlikely. And if we die together in an accident then I am deemed to have died first anyway being the elder.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 5th Oct 18, 5:23 PM
    • 30,225 Posts
    • 77,685 Thanks
    Mojisola
    If he dies first then I will make a will, but with an 18 year age difference that's unlikely. And if we die together in an accident then I am deemed to have died first anyway being the elder.
    Originally posted by easyhomevacuum
    If you both die together (or within a set number of days - I think it's 28), the younger spouse no longer inherits from the older one.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 7th Oct 18, 5:50 PM
    • 20,473 Posts
    • 34,132 Thanks
    Spendless
    If you both die together (or within a set number of days - I think it's 28), the younger spouse no longer inherits from the older one.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    When did that change?


    This article mentions younger inheriting from older is dated beginning of this year.
    https://www.co-oplegalservices.co.uk/media-centre/articles-jan-apr-2018/what-happens-with-our-wills-if-we-die-together/
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 7th Oct 18, 6:04 PM
    • 30,225 Posts
    • 77,685 Thanks
    Mojisola
    www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Geo5/15-16/23/section/46

    F10(2A)Where the intestate’s [F2spouse or civil partner] survived the intestate but died before the end of the period of 28 days beginning with the day on which the intestate died, this section shall have effect as respects the intestate as if the [F2spouse or civil partner] had not survived the intestate.]
    • thaliadaniels
    • By thaliadaniels 7th Nov 18, 12:16 AM
    • 10 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    thaliadaniels
    Right now I'm preparing my assets to my beneficiaries/ wi/children so that if something happens to me, I will not be worried for the future of my family.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 2nd Jan 19, 5:09 PM
    • 31,661 Posts
    • 61,563 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    It's simply an expression of where you would like your assets to go when you die so all of them are 'in' the will, either in detail or as a lump sum of what is left after specific bequests.

    Just because you have few assets now it doesn't mean you won't have them in the (near) future.

    You might win the lottery and die from the shock


    It could be your last chance to tell people what you think of them too.
    Originally posted by Rain Shadow
    And also if your son is a minor, you can appoint a Guardian for him.
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 2nd Jan 19, 5:29 PM
    • 31,661 Posts
    • 61,563 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    Just read this thread, and I have a will dated 2016, so does my husband, in which we both state our wishes.

    However, I have just looked at mine again and wish to include two additional people as beneficiaries. Can I just type this out myself, and sign it in front of witnesses, or would I need to go back to my solicitor?
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

155Posts Today

1,884Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • This probably (who knows) makes it both more likely we'll remain in the EU via a 2nd referendum and more likely we'? https://t.co/GrNV48E1jS

  • Instant aftermath poll: After a defeat by over 230 votes on a flagship issue (Brexit) should Theresa May resign?

  • Wow losing by over 200. That's not defeat it's obliteration. Has there ever been a time before when a PM could lo? https://t.co/i0sVwL9P9P

  • Follow Martin