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  • FIRST POST
    • jinkster
    • By jinkster 4th Jan 18, 11:04 PM
    • 360Posts
    • 54Thanks
    jinkster
    Does anyone burn to Peat?
    • #1
    • 4th Jan 18, 11:04 PM
    Does anyone burn to Peat? 4th Jan 18 at 11:04 PM
    Does anyone burn Peat on a logburner? We have been going through quite a number of logs so wanted to try something different.
Page 1
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 4th Jan 18, 11:55 PM
    • 10,866 Posts
    • 28,890 Thanks
    suki1964
    • #2
    • 4th Jan 18, 11:55 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Jan 18, 11:55 PM
    Ive burned it in my multifuel and tbh I can't abide the smell
    if you lend someone 20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • owen_money
    • By owen_money 12th Jan 18, 2:25 PM
    • 449 Posts
    • 548 Thanks
    owen_money
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 18, 2:25 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 18, 2:25 PM
    I've burnt quite a bit in the past. I quite like the smell but can understand why some people wouldn't. Peat makes quite a lot of fine ash and I would say its more of a mess than logs. I does create a lot of heat, but wouldn't say it lasts longer than logs. It also stays hot for a long time. First time I used it I cleaned out the fire the next day, and the ash was still hot. I have a melted plastic bucket to prove it

    I would give it a go and see what you think
    One man's folly is another man's wife. Helen Roland (1876 - 1950)
    • mumf
    • By mumf 16th Jan 18, 7:30 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 226 Thanks
    mumf
    • #4
    • 16th Jan 18, 7:30 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Jan 18, 7:30 PM
    I've burnt quite a bit in the past. I quite like the smell but can understand why some people wouldn't. Peat makes quite a lot of fine ash and I would say its more of a mess than logs. I does create a lot of heat, but wouldn't say it lasts longer than logs. It also stays hot for a long time. First time I used it I cleaned out the fire the next day, and the ash was still hot. I have a melted plastic bucket to prove it

    I would give it a go and see what you think
    Originally posted by owen_money
    You clean ash out into a plastic bucket?
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 16th Jan 18, 11:15 PM
    • 2,933 Posts
    • 3,616 Thanks
    Ben84
    • #5
    • 16th Jan 18, 11:15 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Jan 18, 11:15 PM
    I don't. Fuel retailers say nice things about it, but what they don't tell you is how bad it is for the environment digging up peat bogs. They're a unique habitat for wildlife, and they take a very long time to deposit layers. I see them as similar to old-growth forests, distinct places that's won't come back if we remove them.

    One alternative I liked a lot is manufactured logs, they're often made from things like sawmill waste (you'd have to check what is in a brand if curious), but I found they can burn a long time with excellent heat output. Their lower moisture content and density really does make a difference.
    • owen_money
    • By owen_money 28th Jan 18, 11:39 AM
    • 449 Posts
    • 548 Thanks
    owen_money
    • #6
    • 28th Jan 18, 11:39 AM
    • #6
    • 28th Jan 18, 11:39 AM
    You clean ash out into a plastic bucket?
    Originally posted by mumf
    Well yes or I wouldnt have wrote it
    One man's folly is another man's wife. Helen Roland (1876 - 1950)
    • GothicStirling
    • By GothicStirling 28th Jan 18, 11:58 AM
    • 1,027 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    GothicStirling
    • #7
    • 28th Jan 18, 11:58 AM
    • #7
    • 28th Jan 18, 11:58 AM
    I don't. Fuel retailers say nice things about it, but what they don't tell you is how bad it is for the environment digging up peat bogs. They're a unique habitat for wildlife, and they take a very long time to deposit layers. I see them as similar to old-growth forests, distinct places that's won't come back if we remove them.

    One alternative I liked a lot is manufactured logs, they're often made from things like sawmill waste (you'd have to check what is in a brand if curious), but I found they can burn a long time with excellent heat output. Their lower moisture content and density really does make a difference.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    As well as releasing carbon into the atmosphere. Peat contains a lot of CO2, responsible for Climate Change
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 28th Jan 18, 8:08 PM
    • 5,183 Posts
    • 6,591 Thanks
    A. Badger
    • #8
    • 28th Jan 18, 8:08 PM
    • #8
    • 28th Jan 18, 8:08 PM
    As well as releasing carbon into the atmosphere. Peat contains a lot of CO2, responsible for Climate Change
    Originally posted by GothicStirling
    Which, even if it is true, is also going to be a problem with any of the fuels discussed on this forum.
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