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  • FIRST POST
    • stronginthesun
    • By stronginthesun 18th Aug 19, 7:47 AM
    • 12Posts
    • 17Thanks
    stronginthesun
    conservatives planning to raise retirement age to 75
    • #1
    • 18th Aug 19, 7:47 AM
    conservatives planning to raise retirement age to 75 18th Aug 19 at 7:47 AM
    please tell me they cant do this . they retire early on massive pensions . us peasants work until we drop .
Page 4
    • metrobus
    • By metrobus 19th Aug 19, 2:44 AM
    • 1,510 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    metrobus
    I'm a peasant myself but have just retired at age 57. I will be providing for myself until SP at age 67. I started full time work at 16, did A levels then professional exams both whilst working full time (and overtime) and was studying into my 30's.

    I do sympathise with people who are strapped for cash but if it's possible you can achieve a lot by working hard and living within your means.
    Originally posted by waveydavey48
    If this think tank gets its way you'll be in your 70s before getting any state pension.I hope you allowed for this when retiring early and did not factor SP income in when planning how you will be funding yourself between 67-75.
    • msallen
    • By msallen 19th Aug 19, 4:04 AM
    • 1,080 Posts
    • 1,354 Thanks
    msallen
    If this think tank gets its way you'll be in your 70s before getting any state pension.I hope you allowed for this when retiring early and did not factor SP income in when planning how you will be funding yourself between 67-75.
    Originally posted by metrobus
    If you imagine for a second that the SP age would be raised from 67-75 within a decade you've got even less idea than the OP.
    • bugslett
    • By bugslett 19th Aug 19, 7:32 AM
    • 348 Posts
    • 1,300 Thanks
    bugslett
    If this think tank gets its way you'll be in your 70s before getting any state pension.
    Originally posted by metrobus

    I factored in the abolition of the state pension as a worst case scenario and I'd get by.
    Yes I'm bugslet, I lost my original log in details and old e-mail address.
    • crv1963
    • By crv1963 19th Aug 19, 7:57 AM
    • 992 Posts
    • 2,255 Thanks
    crv1963
    This parliament, the next parliament and probably the one after are all tied up with Brexit. There is little policy being implemented or even suggested.

    Any reforms to age 75 for SP will be 20+ years down the line. No party is going to go into an election with a pledge to raise it to 75 for any of the current voters. It may well become means tested which may or may not be a good thing, there may be a flat Govt contribution rather than the current 20% and 40% claim.

    I've encouraged my sons and some that I work with to look to see when they want to go and how much they'll need to go. From that they get a plan, then start.

    I disagree with the assertion that my generation has had it lucky with house price increases and inheritances. I'm afraid it has been graft for me, sometimes doing jobs I didn't enjoy but I chose to stay in my sector because of the pension, once I'd realised how good it was, in return I work hard and long.

    My choices are for me and mine, others work to their goals. I've tried to teach and think I have taught my sons- no one owes you a living, you get what you pay for, you are responsible for you. Also don't count on an inheritance there are too many variables on the way, including care costs.

    The moral of the suggestion by the "think tank" is that they got what they wanted- reaction, discussion and publicity. The Politicians get to put a finger into the wind and find out if their identified or target voters will support something more watered down.

    All anyone can do really is save within the current rules.
    CRV1963- Light bulb moment Sept 15- Planning the great escape- aka retirement!
    • Paul_Herring
    • By Paul_Herring 19th Aug 19, 9:34 AM
    • 6,921 Posts
    • 3,600 Thanks
    Paul_Herring
    The current retirement age is not sustainable currently.
    Contrary to some opinions, the NHS has gotten too effective at keeping people alive for longer and generally people are healthier and are living longer.
    Originally posted by ToxicWomble
    But, but, but, forcing people to give up smoking and drinking is going to save the country squillions!! We're told so, so it must be true!

    You're implying the opposite must somehow be true...
    Conjugating the verb 'to be":
    -o I am humble -o You are attention seeking -o She is Nadine Dorries
    • cfw1994
    • By cfw1994 19th Aug 19, 10:05 AM
    • 385 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    cfw1994
    (sorry, this is a bit of a ramble!)
    I'll just hop on to say that I feel I *have* been very fortunate through my career.

    My family encouraged me to get out & do things (first job aged 10!!), I become the first in our family to go to Uni (when, let's be honest, it cost a lot less than it does now).
    I got into IT early, and again, that has been a 'lucky' career choice for the past 30 or more years for those in it.
    I've certainly worked very hard during those times, but also been lucky enough to make a good couple of career moves that worked well for me. I've been lucky to be in a company that went from a handful of UK folk when I joined to over 250 (& to become a rare company that blows on past $5bn in value, with some outstanding leaders over the years)

    I do count those blessings, but also look back & think "well, I chose to make those leaps of faith", & they did each come with a risk.
    Each time I have moved roles/companies(even house moves!), I have literally written down pros & cons for leave or stay. Being in IT makes me reasonably analytical and perhaps slightly 'dispassionate' about these things - I have never been a 'political' mover in these matters.

    BUT: I don't think things are far worse for youngsters today.
    The opportunities are huge - there is access to a phenomenal amount of information, where back in the 80s, we had none!
    Despite the awful news we get used to reading about, the world IS becoming a better, more informed, healthier place to live. Take a look at this TED talk - sadly he died a couple of years back, but his son continues the research.
    Yes, I have concerns like many over the environment, but that is (& will be) a huge growth area for the next 20-30+ years. I maintain the belief that whilst there are some terrible humans we give headline news to the majority are decent hardworking people who want to improve things. Maybe my rose-tinted specs are too strong

    Yes, Uni fees are far higher, but they are literally a future tax on their future earnings, assuming they get a decent wage. People (& especially parents) who think of it as a huge debt need to read Martin Lewis' pages on this and educate them selves and their offspring more accurately.
    Housing: well, my parents last house (bought in the 60s!) cost 600, so certainly things change....& I look at other economies - in Germany, even 30 years ago when I went on sports exchange trips, City-dwellers would generally rent until their late 30s - perhaps we are moving the same way. Japan has 60+ year mortgages. Who knows how that will end.
    But I remain positive for the future!
    • Freeman24reverseFpenny
    • By Freeman24reverseFpenny 19th Aug 19, 12:11 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Freeman24reverseFpenny
    Raise SPA to 75?

    They will be out for a generation.

    People would prefer the risk of Corbyn to that.
    Originally posted by ffacoffipawb
    100% agreed. This was zany thinking by some idiot in a think thank. Not only a massive vote loser, but also out of kilter with global retirement ages. There aren't any above 70.
    • metrobus
    • By metrobus 19th Aug 19, 12:15 PM
    • 1,510 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    metrobus
    If you imagine for a second that the SP age would be raised from 67-75 within a decade you've got even less idea than the OP.
    Originally posted by msallen
    That's not what I said,go back and read it through a little slower.
    • metrobus
    • By metrobus 19th Aug 19, 12:16 PM
    • 1,510 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    metrobus
    I factored in the abolition of the state pension as a worst case scenario and I'd get by.
    Originally posted by bugslett
    Good for you,well done.
    • westv
    • By westv 19th Aug 19, 12:26 PM
    • 4,860 Posts
    • 2,441 Thanks
    westv
    I've not factored in abolition of the state pension or a rise to 120. I don't think either will ever happen.
    • msallen
    • By msallen 19th Aug 19, 12:28 PM
    • 1,080 Posts
    • 1,354 Thanks
    msallen
    That's not what I said,go back and read it through a little slower.
    Originally posted by metrobus
    Yes it is. Your comment was in response to someone 10 years away from SP age. Try writing a little slower.
    • waveydavey48
    • By waveydavey48 19th Aug 19, 1:09 PM
    • 62 Posts
    • 84 Thanks
    waveydavey48
    If this think tank gets its way you'll be in your 70s before getting any state pension.I hope you allowed for this when retiring early and did not factor SP income in when planning how you will be funding yourself between 67-75.
    Originally posted by metrobus
    Yes I did factor in that (in my opinion incredibly unlikely) scenario, thank you. I think such changes are only implemented after a lot of notice and the fact that it would be electoral suicide suggests to me it won't happen.
    • bugslett
    • By bugslett 19th Aug 19, 2:20 PM
    • 348 Posts
    • 1,300 Thanks
    bugslett
    I've not factored in abolition of the state pension or a rise to 120. I don't think either will ever happen.
    Originally posted by westv
    Just for clarity, neither do I, but whilst thinking about retiring I thought I may as well look at multiple scenarios.
    Yes I'm bugslet, I lost my original log in details and old e-mail address.
    • Anonymous101
    • By Anonymous101 19th Aug 19, 3:28 PM
    • 1,397 Posts
    • 1,118 Thanks
    Anonymous101
    Yes I did factor in that (in my opinion incredibly unlikely) scenario, thank you. I think such changes are only implemented after a lot of notice and the fact that it would be electoral suicide suggests to me it won't happen.
    Originally posted by waveydavey48


    Yes that's a huge factor. The grey vote is only getting bigger and more powerful so any proposed changes would have to be so far down the line that the current generation with their eyes on retirement wouldn't kick off too much.
    • bonnyrigger
    • By bonnyrigger 19th Aug 19, 4:07 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    bonnyrigger
    Easy way to deal with this is just say no - if any Party brings this forward they will be toast. No need to accept any of this garbage - stop reading the Daily Mail/Daily Express, stop voting self-servative, and stop kicking the younger generation - you'll feel so much better!
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 19th Aug 19, 6:05 PM
    • 14,478 Posts
    • 12,818 Thanks
    zagfles
    Just stop believing fake news posted on the internet.

    Maybe we should all report this thread as the title is a lie.
    • pensionpawn
    • By pensionpawn 19th Aug 19, 8:06 PM
    • 176 Posts
    • 155 Thanks
    pensionpawn
    Yes that's a huge factor. The grey vote is only getting bigger and more powerful so any proposed changes would have to be so far down the line that the current generation with their eyes on retirement wouldn't kick off too much.
    Originally posted by Anonymous101
    Me and my wife will start to receive, in quite a few years time, our SP within 6 months of each other. That's 17,500 tax free pa at today's rate which is way too much for me to disregard from our pension planning. If any government even try to erode / take that away after paying into the system for 35 years the ensuing sh1tstorm will make Brexit look like a minor disagreement between friends!
    • penners324
    • By penners324 19th Aug 19, 8:27 PM
    • 107 Posts
    • 68 Thanks
    penners324
    The state retirement age has to go up. State pensions are rapidly becoming unaffordable as average age goes up, thus the number of people of pension able age also goes up.
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 19th Aug 19, 9:10 PM
    • 6,256 Posts
    • 5,709 Thanks
    mgdavid
    The state retirement age has to go up. State pensions are rapidly becoming unaffordable as average age goes up, thus the number of people of pension able age also goes up.
    Originally posted by penners324

    ...and round we go in circles....
    as was said in this or a similar thread a couple of days ago, average age is not going up, longevity has stabilised and in some parts of the union it has even turned back downwards a little.
    The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....
    • Paul_Herring
    • By Paul_Herring 19th Aug 19, 9:27 PM
    • 6,921 Posts
    • 3,600 Thanks
    Paul_Herring
    ...and round we go in circles....
    as was said in this or a similar thread a couple of days ago, average age is not going up, longevity has stabilised and in some parts of the union it has even turned back downwards a little.
    Originally posted by mgdavid
    T'was me earlier in this one.

    Conjugating the verb 'to be":
    -o I am humble -o You are attention seeking -o She is Nadine Dorries
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