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  • FIRST POST
    • Moneysaving222
    • By Moneysaving222 14th Jun 19, 6:52 PM
    • 62Posts
    • 15Thanks
    Moneysaving222
    Is my vendor or real estate agent lying to me
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 19, 6:52 PM
    Is my vendor or real estate agent lying to me 14th Jun 19 at 6:52 PM
    Ive made an offer on a house not knowing there was structural movement, my mistake for not seeing it. My mortgage company picked it up and later my survey. I didnít realize that both did surveys.

    Anyway, the vendor reckons she doesnít know about the structural movement, got her to get a structural engineer to visit the property and do a report. It was agreed we would swap reports. In the meantime I spoke to the admin person for my mortgage application and she says the report would have to be in my name and that it would be best if I instructed my own structural report (I agreed).

    I have spoken to the vendors representative, aka the Estate Agent (EA) and apparently she had just got a voicemail at 2pm (I called 2:05pm. I sent an sms at 7pm because I hadnít heard. The issue with the subsidence is apparently the windows or the drains.

    Ok Iím clearly been taken for a mug - but by who? Are all EA liars? Did they do the structural report. Any ideas?
Page 3
    • martindow
    • By martindow 16th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    • 8,293 Posts
    • 4,858 Thanks
    martindow
    So I either spend £180 now or write of anything.
    Originally posted by Moneysaving222
    Where does £180 come from? I had to pay several times that for a structural engineer to come out and report on a crack in my house. I think it was around £500 about ten years ago.
    • Moneysaving222
    • By Moneysaving222 16th Jun 19, 12:29 PM
    • 62 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Moneysaving222
    The price agreed with the engineer to have a look at the cracks. Not the report.

    Yes the reports are starting from £400 and don’t include if they need to do further reports etc.
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 16th Jun 19, 1:50 PM
    • 2,430 Posts
    • 1,609 Thanks
    Nebulous2
    Hi Nebulous2, I called and canít get insurance for 12 months after work is done. Also I think pre-existing work isnít covered. Owner is in denial about structural movement.
    Originally posted by Moneysaving222
    I'm beginning to think I may have been very fortunate. As I said I wasn't asked for any information other than the homebuyers report. There is nothing to show any work has ever been done. I expect the insurer knows from the postcode that subsidence isn't common. My own view was that it has stood for almost 300 years and is likely to last a bit longer.
    • Moneysaving222
    • By Moneysaving222 16th Jun 19, 10:30 PM
    • 62 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Moneysaving222
    Hi Nebulous. Yes I don’t know. Perhaps the surveyor was happy with the work already carried out? Mine is obvious there needs to be work done and holes filled etc.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 17th Jun 19, 11:54 AM
    • 4,889 Posts
    • 8,301 Thanks
    Smodlet
    I'm beginning to think I may have been very fortunate. As I said I wasn't asked for any information other than the homebuyers report. There is nothing to show any work has ever been done. I expect the insurer knows from the postcode that subsidence isn't common. My own view was that it has stood for almost 300 years and is likely to last a bit longer.
    Originally posted by Nebulous2
    Hi Nebulous. Yes I donít know. Perhaps the surveyor was happy with the work already carried out? Mine is obvious there needs to be work done and holes filled etc.
    Originally posted by Moneysaving222

    No insurance policy is going to cover for historical damage.

    As far as I'm aware, no insurance companies are going to cover buildings where there is a present ongoing subsidence* issue (grounds for suspicion or proven)

    They may cover building where there is historic subsidence (i.e., it has been remedied, and in the expert of an appropriate qualified person, is unlikely to pose a problem in the future). There'll likely be an increased excess, and possibly higher premiums.

    As it stands, the property cannot be insured for subsidence. And even if it's fixed, a new insurance policy isn't going to cover old damage.
    Originally posted by kinger101

    Apologies if anything I wrote was unclear but kinger101 has clarified the situation admirably, I think. Should anything further be needed, I hope the below may help:

    If, when taking out an insurance policy, one can state without fear of contradiction that there is neither history nor present evidence of subsidence, one can obtain cover against such. If, however, there is evidence of either historical or current damage caused by same, one will not be able to insure against it without going to a specialist insurer, who will charge several times the cost of a "normal" policy and may still refuse to insure the property at all.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Jumblebumble
    • By Jumblebumble 18th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    • 346 Posts
    • 125 Thanks
    Jumblebumble
    Look.Ignore what people trying to sell a house are telling you. They just want to sell the house.


    I.
    Originally posted by G_M
    The same advice is actually good for all second hand items and to cars in particular
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