Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 18th Jun 08, 9:50 AM
    • 8,864Posts
    • 19,048Thanks
    setmefree2
    My Energy use Diary
    • #1
    • 18th Jun 08, 9:50 AM
    My Energy use Diary 18th Jun 08 at 9:50 AM
    I have started another personal challenge. This one is to reduce our energy use:-

    I've analysed our use as follows:-

    GAS
    June Qtr 2006 61 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.34
    June Qtr 2007 42 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 0.96
    June Qtr 2008 50 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.12
    June Qtr 2009 30 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 0.78
    June Qtr 2010 37 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.16 TARRIFF INCREASE APR 2010

    Sept Qtr 2006 8 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 0.08
    Sept Qtr 2007 11 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 0.32
    Sept Qtr 2008 8 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 0.23
    Sept Qtr 2009 11 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 0.36

    Dec Qtr 2006 66Kilowat hrs per day Cost Per day
    1.43
    Dec Qtr 2007 66 Kilowat hrs per day Cost Per day 1.43
    Dec Qtr 2008 69 Kilowat hrs per day Cost Per day 1.50
    Dec Qtr 2009 51 Kilowat hrs per day Cost Per day 1.21


    Mar Qtr 2007 118 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 2.48
    Mar Qtr 2008 113 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 2.38
    Mar Qtr 2009 104 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 2.19
    Mar Qtr 2010 114 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 2.40

    ELECTRICITY

    June Qtr 2007 17 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.32
    June Qtr 2008 18 kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.39
    June Qtr 2009 15 kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.16
    June Qtr 2010 18 kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.84 TARRIFF INCREASE APR 2010

    Sept Qtr 2006 16 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.20
    Sept Qtr 2007 14 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per Day 1.12
    Sept Qtr 2008 11 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per Day 0.89
    Sept Qtr 2009 15 Kilowot hrs per day Cost Per Day 1.13

    Dec Qtr 2006 21 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.57
    Dec Qtr 2007 21 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.57
    Dec Qtr 2008 17 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.30
    Dec Qtr 2009 20 Kilowat hrs per day Cost Per day 1.50

    Mar Qtr 2007 23 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.72
    Mar Qtr 2008 25 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.73
    Mar Qtr 2009 20 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.48
    Mar Qtr 2010 21 Kilowat hrs per day Cost per day 1.58





    Both Mr and Mrs SMF2 work from home alot. Though Mr SMF2 is away alot. So the challenge is to try and get these usage figures down. At the moment we have a capped dual fule rate with BG fixed until 1st May 2010 - (it was capped in 2005, I think).

    This Forum Tip was included in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email

    Don't miss out on new deals, loopholes, and vouchers

    Last edited by setmefree2; 09-09-2010 at 12:35 PM. Reason: Update Jan 2009

Page 1
    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 18th Jun 08, 9:55 AM
    • 8,864 Posts
    • 19,048 Thanks
    setmefree2
    • #2
    • 18th Jun 08, 9:55 AM
    • #2
    • 18th Jun 08, 9:55 AM
    So we have:-

    1) Replaced bulbs with energy saving
    2) Cut down use of tumble drier, dish washer & washing machine
    3) Am using a flask for hot water
    4) Bought a carpet sweeper
    5) Make sure everything is switched off when not in use
    6) Reduced hot water being on to 1ce per day.

    I have been doing this for 9 days. Our average electricity use for this time of year is 15 Kilowat hours per day. For 7 days we have managed to use less than this (range 5 to 13) and matched it twice.

  • A fiend for life
    • #3
    • 18th Jun 08, 12:19 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Jun 08, 12:19 PM
    Highly commendable!

    I've just started keeping a similar log 3 weeks ago but I am cheating a little as I have only myself to answer to so no need to negotiate.

    I'm finding it hard to squeeze out more kilowatt hours though. Hand washing dishes in cold water is one I've adopted even better if stuff isn't greasy.

    I've cheated with the gas though cos I switched it off - central heating only.
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 20th Jun 08, 8:15 AM
    • 5,397 Posts
    • 5,024 Thanks
    thescouselander
    • #4
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:15 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:15 AM
    So we have:-

    1) Replaced bulbs with energy saving
    2) Cut down use of tumble drier, dish washer & washing machine
    3) Am using a flask for hot water
    4) Bought a carpet sweeper
    5) Make sure everything is switched off when not in use
    6) Reduced hot water being on to 1ce per day.

    I have been doing this for 9 days. Our average electricity use for this time of year is 15 Kilowat hours per day. For 7 days we have managed to use less than this (range 5 to 13) and matched it twice.
    Originally posted by setmefree2
    I tried all this a while back -

    1) Energy saving bulbs did not make a detectable difference to my daily usage - the benefits of these things have been totally overstated.

    2) Less use of the tumble drier definitely works but the effect of using the washing-machine less was much less noticeable (its A rated anyway).


    The biggest use of electricity in my house it the electric shower - rated at 10 KW it accounts for under half the electricity used in the house (4 units per day). If you have one of these I suggest you could make the largest savings here.
    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 20th Jun 08, 10:07 AM
    • 8,864 Posts
    • 19,048 Thanks
    setmefree2
    • #5
    • 20th Jun 08, 10:07 AM
    • #5
    • 20th Jun 08, 10:07 AM
    Hi

    Things are going well and I'm learning as I go.

    ELECTRICITY
    Over the last 10 days we have averaged 10 kilowot per hr usgae down from 15. That's a reduction of a THIRD on this time of year.

    I have been;-

    1) Line drying all clothes. (I am also going to buy some tumble drier balls for the winter when I'm next at the shops).
    2) Washing only twice a week with full loads and low temperatures.
    3) Using flask for hot water
    4) Everything turned off - nothing on stand by
    5) Stopped using dish washer (and it hasn't gone smelly - phew)
    6) Realised my lap top is more economical than a desk top computer (I work from home and so does Mr SMF2)
    7) Using carpet sweeper instead of vacuum cleaner
    8) Found some compact SES light bulbs, which I havn't seen before.

    GAS
    We don't use much of this in the summer but I am now heating water up once a day - instead of 2 times. This has worked well so far.

    The whole family is now involved. Mr SMF2 (aka gadget man) bought a gadget for measuring usage of appliances, gadgets, etc which is enlightening. But I was stunned to find that my kids are actually start to switch their lights of before they go to school. Unheard of. There's hope for us yet!

    All The Best

    SMF2
    Last edited by setmefree2; 20-06-2008 at 10:24 AM.

    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 20th Jun 08, 10:11 AM
    • 8,864 Posts
    • 19,048 Thanks
    setmefree2
    • #6
    • 20th Jun 08, 10:11 AM
    • #6
    • 20th Jun 08, 10:11 AM
    Less use of the tumble drier definitely works but the effect of using the washing-machine less was much less noticeable (its A rated anyway).
    Originally posted by thescouselander
    Agree with this - my washing machine does seem economical. But since we are reasonably clued up, any energy saving we do is going to be at the margins....every little helps.
    Last edited by setmefree2; 20-06-2008 at 10:24 AM.

    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 20th Jun 08, 10:13 AM
    • 8,864 Posts
    • 19,048 Thanks
    setmefree2
    • #7
    • 20th Jun 08, 10:13 AM
    • #7
    • 20th Jun 08, 10:13 AM
    The biggest use of electricity in my house it the electric shower - rated at 10 KW it accounts for under half the electricity used in the house (4 units per day). If you have one of these I suggest you could make the largest savings here.
    Originally posted by thescouselander
    Our weakness is PCs I think Followed by dishwasher, tumble drier (in winter) and my massive SMEG oven...though I have a smaller combination microwave/oven which I use alot.

  • moonrakerz
    • #8
    • 20th Jun 08, 2:23 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Jun 08, 2:23 PM
    1) Energy saving bulbs did not make a detectable difference to my daily usage - the benefits of these things have been totally overstated.
    Originally posted by thescouselander
    Don't really see how you can say that - it is a simple matter of arithmetic. Low energy lamps use about 20% of the power of tungsten filament lamps and last 6 to 10 times longer - the benefits are plain to see.

    For 8000 hrs of light.

    One 20W low energy lamp lasts 8000hrs, uses 160kWh over it's life, plus 1 for the lamp = 17 (assume electricity @ 10p/kWh)

    Eight 100W tungsten lamps use 800kWh over their life, plus 2 for 8 lamps = 82
    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 20th Jun 08, 5:09 PM
    • 8,864 Posts
    • 19,048 Thanks
    setmefree2
    • #9
    • 20th Jun 08, 5:09 PM
    • #9
    • 20th Jun 08, 5:09 PM
    Hi ,

    I have a 6.5 l slowcooker. I filled it with spag bol at 11 o'clock and have just switched it off. Using Mr SMF2's gadget it used 1.18 kilowats. I reckon that's about 7 or 8 pence. There is enough spag bol to feed at least 10 - if not more. Chuffed!

    • geordie joe
    • By geordie joe 20th Jun 08, 8:08 PM
    • 8,399 Posts
    • 8,454 Thanks
    geordie joe
    Don't really see how you can say that - it is a simple matter of arithmetic. Low energy lamps use about 20% of the power of tungsten filament lamps and last 6 to 10 times longer - the benefits are plain to see.

    For 8000 hrs of light.

    One 20W low energy lamp lasts 8000hrs, uses 160kWh over it's life, plus 1 for the lamp = 17 (assume electricity @ 10p/kWh)

    Eight 100W tungsten lamps use 800kWh over their life, plus 2 for 8 lamps = 82
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    Your maths are right, but the key words thescouselander used were "Energy saving bulbs did not make a detectable difference to my daily usage"

    Your calculations, ignoring the cost of the bulbs as we are only interested in the daily electricity usage, show that an energy saving bulb will save 64 over 8000 hours of use.

    Supposing you use the bulb for 6 hours per day, that makes it 1333.333 days of use you get from the bulb (8000/6). 6400 pence / 1333.333 = 4.8 pence per day.

    Every household is different, but I suppose some would find a saving of 4.8p per day to be undetectable. Especially if the amount the household uses per day varies, it would be difficult to detect a 4.8p drop.
  • moonrakerz
    Your maths are right, but the key words thescouselander used were "Energy saving bulbs did not make a detectable difference to my daily usage"
    Originally posted by geordie joe
    What about these "key words" ?
    "the benefits of these things have been totally overstated"


    - the benefits have not been overstated as I, and others, have shown - simple maths, they use MUCH less electricity.

    I really fail to see why these devices are poo-poohed, £17 against £82 for each light seems a no-brainer to me.

    Supposing you use the bulb for 6 hours per day .....Every household is different,
    Originally posted by geordie joe
    Very true - most houses have more than one light - if you have kids, every b****y light is on !
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 21st Jun 08, 7:41 AM
    • 27,995 Posts
    • 13,846 Thanks
    Cardew
    To emphasize moonrakerz's point, the use of one Energy saving bulb could save more in a year than the standby consumption for the whole house.

    Yet standby consumption is seen as the major problem by many!
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 21st Jun 08, 11:10 AM
    • 5,397 Posts
    • 5,024 Thanks
    thescouselander
    Yes, Gordie Joe has hit the nail on the head. When I say there was no detectable difference I meant that my average daily electricity consumption remained unchanged at around 9 units per day.

    I still say the benefits of these bulbs are overstated - you often see claims that these bulbs will save x many pounds per year per bulb - obviously this depends on usage but we are very good at turning lights off in our house and there are only two of us anyway. In our case I dont think the savings amount to much at all.
    • setmefree2
    • By setmefree2 21st Jun 08, 4:29 PM
    • 8,864 Posts
    • 19,048 Thanks
    setmefree2
    Hi

    It's going to be a every little helps approach for us. Indeed, if everyone used these light bulbs we'd all be better of as a nation, I think:confused:..Though I take your point that I'm not going to save lots of energy or money.

    In the winter our electricity shoots up, however, I think that most of this is due to our tumble drier but abit will be due to lighting.

    Had another good day yesterday. Came in under 15 KH, despite the fact we had to charge the car battery.

    • geordie joe
    • By geordie joe 21st Jun 08, 8:01 PM
    • 8,399 Posts
    • 8,454 Thanks
    geordie joe
    What about these "key words" ?
    "the benefits of these things have been totally overstated"


    - the benefits have not been overstated as I, and others, have shown - simple maths, they use MUCH less electricity.
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    Nobody ever said you overstated them, they just said they have been over stated.

    I really fail to see why these devices are poo-poohed, 17 against 82 for each light seems a no-brainer to me.
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    Yes but the original post was about not being able to see the saving on a day by day basis. You figures were for the lifetime of a light bulb, which you quoted as 8000 hours. Using a light for 6 hours per day makes that 3.65 years for a saving of 65.

    Per day that saving is very small and I can easily see that a heavy user would not notice the saving if they were checking their meter daily.

    Then there is the other side, an energy saving light bulb only saves money and electricity when it is switched on. When they are switched off the cost the same as any other bulb that is switched off.

    I have 12 of these bulbs in my house but only the two in the living room save me any measurable amount of money. This is because the others are either never switched on or switched on for a very few minutes only.

    Very true - most houses have more than one light - if you have kids, every b****y light is on !
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    If you have a bunch of kids who leave a lot of lights on the chance are you also have a bunch of kids who have every electric gadget known to man left switched on in their bedrooms. You washer, tumble drier and dish washer may appear to be on 24/7 too. This means you will be using a high amount of electricity, therefore the small amounts (per day) that the bulbs save may not be noticeable.

    After typing all that please don't get me wrong, I'm in favour of energy saving bulbs and know that save money compared to ordinary ones. The amount they save can be calculated, and has been in here many times.

    However, the amount of money you will save depends on how much you use the lights. If you are like me and don't use your lights much then you will save less money. If you have a large family that leave lights on a lot then you will save more money, but if you also have a lot of appliances running and consume a lot of electricity then the amount you save will be a small percentage of what you use.

    The claims that are overstated about these bulbs are the ones that say you can save MASSIVE amounts of money with these bulbs, or that they can reduce your electricity consumption by up to 35%. Or my favourite "If we all changed to energy saving light bulbs we could reduce our CO2 emissions and save the planet"
    • geordie joe
    • By geordie joe 21st Jun 08, 8:18 PM
    • 8,399 Posts
    • 8,454 Thanks
    geordie joe
    To emphasize moonrakerz's point, the use of one Energy saving bulb could save more in a year than the standby consumption for the whole house.

    Yet standby consumption is seen as the major problem by many!
    Originally posted by Cardew
    That's very true, but I think people jump on that band wagon because most things don't need to be on standby, therefore the electricity they are using is wasted.

    Just been off to look at the spreadsheet I made when I got my leccy meter thingy.

    According to that my one 100Watt bulb left on for 6 hours per day would cost 20.17 per year. A 14Watt energy saver would cost 2.82 per year making a saving of 17.35 per year.

    If I left all the items I have on standby for 12 hours per day it would cost 38.52 per year. That's more than the amount saved by two energy saving bulbs used for 6 hours per day. So if it's worth changing your living room bulb for an energy saving one it's worth turning things off instead of leaving them on standby.
  • moonrakerz
    . Or my favourite "If we all changed to energy saving light bulbs we could reduce our CO2 emissions and save the planet"
    Originally posted by geordie joe
    Actually you hit the nail right on the head there - but perhaps not in the way that you think.

    If we all DID change to energy saving light bulbs we would make a huge saving in electricity consumption - I will make no comment on CO2 emissions and saving the planet - because as you may well have gathered I am a bit of a sceptic on those points !
    • geordie joe
    • By geordie joe 21st Jun 08, 10:47 PM
    • 8,399 Posts
    • 8,454 Thanks
    geordie joe
    Actually you hit the nail right on the head there - but perhaps not in the way that you think.

    If we all DID change to energy saving light bulbs we would make a huge saving in electricity consumption -
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    I am in total agreement with you there, my point was that some will save a lot more than others.

    But the main point is that changing to energy saving light bulbs will save money/electricity. That saving is real and can be measured, and has been on here. But that measurement should not be expressed as a percentage of your electricity bill, nor should it be expressed as "a MASSIVE saving". It should be expressed as one light bulb will save you x per hour, then you should calculate how many hours your bulbs are on.

    I will make no comment on CO2 emissions and saving the planet - because as you may well have gathered I am a bit of a sceptic on those points !
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    Me too, I have no interest in saving the planet. I don't even think it needs saving.
    I certainly don't think changing to energy saving light bulbs, banning carrier bags and not leaving things on standby will save it anyway.

    I am interested in saving money, which is why I hang round here.
  • moonrakerz
    ........and what did I see in The Telegraph this morning !

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/06/21/eantrust121.xml
    • geordie joe
    • By geordie joe 22nd Jun 08, 8:49 AM
    • 8,399 Posts
    • 8,454 Thanks
    geordie joe
    ........and what did I see in The Telegraph this morning !

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/06/21/eantrust121.xml
    Originally posted by moonrakerz
    Just one of them can reduce your electricity bill by 74 a year
    I haven't done the maths, but I suspect you'd have to keep the light on 24 hours per day 365 days per year to save that much.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

3,296Posts Today

8,576Users online

Martin's Twitter