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    • RussWWFC
    • By RussWWFC 31st Aug 10, 10:58 AM
    • 555 Posts
    • 180 Thanks
    RussWWFC
    • #2
    • 31st Aug 10, 10:58 AM
    • #2
    • 31st Aug 10, 10:58 AM
    My 02 reg Ibiza costs around 13-14p a mile, that's without me really trying to dive economically. I worked out that is around 40mpg
    Wycombe Till I Die
    • Butti
    • By Butti 31st Aug 10, 11:53 AM
    • 4,901 Posts
    • 14,282 Thanks
    Butti
    • #3
    • 31st Aug 10, 11:53 AM
    • #3
    • 31st Aug 10, 11:53 AM
    For those of us without an indicator of exactly how much petrol is in the tank there's always the danger of running out of petrol. Last week 'just' managed to get to the petrol station - the guy behind me helped me push the car to the pump!

    B
    Debt LBM (08/09) £11,641. (08/12) £22,734. (2/19 )£4621
    Diary 'Butti's journey : A matter of loaf or death'.
    Diary 2 'The whimsical tale of the Waterbed of Debt'
    35% 35.4% 36.3% off mortgage
    'one day I will be rich and famous…for now I'll just have to settle for being poor and incredibly sexy'. Vimrod Member of MIKE'S MOB
  • msmyth18
    • #4
    • 31st Aug 10, 12:08 PM
    • #4
    • 31st Aug 10, 12:08 PM
    I use a Iphone app called roadtrip, my 97 fiesta 1.25 averages 40.02 MPG over the last 6 months. 13p per mile!
    • Bongedone
    • By Bongedone 31st Aug 10, 12:12 PM
    • 2,390 Posts
    • 1,636 Thanks
    Bongedone
    • #5
    • 31st Aug 10, 12:12 PM
    • #5
    • 31st Aug 10, 12:12 PM
    With correct driving my Citroen C3 HDi manages 70mpg. If I rag it around not taking any notice of my driving it drops to 63mpg.
    • Percy1983
    • By Percy1983 31st Aug 10, 12:38 PM
    • 4,990 Posts
    • 7,824 Thanks
    Percy1983
    • #6
    • 31st Aug 10, 12:38 PM
    • #6
    • 31st Aug 10, 12:38 PM
    As it is I need to start doing this, but the accelerator pedal isn't just a money pump but a happy button in my little C2 for me and i quite like to hit the rev limiter in 2nd on a slip road.

    As it is when I drive the focus, its big and slow and a never get such urges and use less petrol.

    As a side question on this and anybody tried the Shell fuelsave petrol? does it work?
  • JohalaReewi
    • #7
    • 31st Aug 10, 1:01 PM
    • #7
    • 31st Aug 10, 1:01 PM
    Check out Hypermiling...

    http://www.cleanmpg.com/cmps_index.php?page=hypermiling
    • pat428
    • By pat428 31st Aug 10, 1:04 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    pat428
    • #8
    • 31st Aug 10, 1:04 PM
    Tesco Fuel
    • #8
    • 31st Aug 10, 1:04 PM
    Tesco are advertising a new fuel which they promise you will get more miles from,not sure if you know about it,i'm going to try it as soon as I need a fill up.
    • camaj
    • By camaj 31st Aug 10, 1:13 PM
    • 496 Posts
    • 241 Thanks
    camaj
    • #9
    • 31st Aug 10, 1:13 PM
    • #9
    • 31st Aug 10, 1:13 PM
    Reading Martins post reminds me of something I could have written! I probably would have been a bit more scientific about it though if I wanted to do a proper test. If you have a very accurate fuel gauge, as Martin suggests, then you only need to compare two identical trips. You could make a note of your fuel level, drive for 5 miles, and return to the start and note how much petrol you've used. Fill up and repeat but drive more efficiently. If you don't have an accurate gauge I've read that you should fill up and then when you return note how much you needed to put in to fill up again (which would equal the amount you consumed). This might be the most accurate way since pumps measure in 10ml amounts (0.05 litres)

    When I drive I use similar techniques to the ones Martin describes. I always keep a good distance to avoid unnecessary breaking but it's also a very good safety measure. Older members (older than me anyway) may know the "only a fool ignores the two second rule" slogan from the 70's. You're supposed to measure the time it takes the back of the car in front and the front of your car to pass a fixed point on the road, or roadside. If it's less than two seconds then you're too close. I think a better way of explaing why breaking is bad is simply to say the more you break the more you have to use the accelerator to return to your original speed.

    Since I often did the same journey it was easier to judge things like lights. I would take my foot off the accelerator when I approached the traffic waiting at lights so I'd slow down gradually without breaking. Since there was already a queue there it wasn't like I was holding anyone back behind me either. Ideally you would reach the back of the queue without touching the break or stalling. Better yet, the traffic would start moving and you'd be able to put your foot back on the accelerator without coming to a stop. This works at junctions and roundabouts too. If you've got no one behind you could take as much time as you need.

    Martin says that when he does drive, it's often in urban traffic with a lot of sitting in queues. If that's your most common journey then buying a car with MHD (Micro hybrid drive AKA stop-start or mild Hybrid) should be your priority next time you buy a car. Essentially these are cars that switch the engine off when your stationary or crawling along, which is something you can't really do yourself in a normal car unless you're really not moving at all for a long time. They're not as complex as proper hybrids and you can even get a Smart car with MHD now. Sadly some hybrids aren't as efficient as people think because they're usually big cars that weigh a lot because of the extra bits they need.

    I've been obsessing about efficiency for years now, even before I bought a car. I remember being wowed at a Nissan review in the local paper that promised 50mpg! Now cars can offer 74mpg+ and that'll improve in the future. Hopefully these cars will trickle down the market in a few years but only if new car buyers pick them today.

    There's a couple, John and Helen Taylor, who constantly set world records for efficiency in even family cars. I think they get 100MPG+ I'd love to know how but they probably wouldn't want to let the competition in on it
    Last edited by camaj; 31-08-2010 at 1:29 PM.
    • Brydav
    • By Brydav 31st Aug 10, 1:16 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    Brydav
    Switch to diesel!
    Martin's figures of "around £37" and "around 30 litres" are a bit vague, but from them I calculate the MPG would be "around" 44.4 over the 293 miles. This is quite good for a petrol car in mostly urban driving - my old 998cc Nissan Micra only averaged 37 MPG in combined urban,rural and occasional motorway usage.

    I don't know anything about Smart cars so I checked their web site. The current range doesn't include a 699cc engine, but their official figure of 42.8 MPG (urban) for the 999cc model compares well with Martin's 44.4. This suggests that Smart's quoted MPG figures are fairly accurate, so Martin should trade his car in for the diesel model: at 85.6 MPG 30 litres would take him over 550 miles and, even assuming diesel costs a couple of pence more per litre, a cost per mile of 6.6p

    I've driven a 1.9 litre diesel Skoda Octavia for the last couple of years. I do around 450 miles between refills (but it's a bigger tank, 55 litres compared to the Smart's 33). I wouldn't say I was a 'bad' driver but I am aware that I tend to accelerate quite hard and brake late. Even so, my average is just over 50 MPG on a mix of motorway and urban driving. Skoda quote 58 MPG combined and 46.3 MPG urban, so even this relatively big, comfortable car would beat Martin's 44.4 in his petrol Smart car (but probably not as easy to park!)

    Does this make me sound like an evangelist for diesel? It probably does, but I can't see me ever buying a petrol engined car again until hybrid technology becomes mainstream.

    P.S. If 30 litres costs £37 that's 123.33p a litre, which is quite high (even in London) perhaps Martin should be following his own advice and shopping around! I don't know where Martin lives but in N1 (for example) Petrolprices.com says the cheapest petrol available today is 117.9p whilst the dearest is 125.9p


    - These are 'back of an envelope' calculations, I'm not a mathematician so they may not be 100% accurate
  • JohalaReewi
    Tesco are advertising a new fuel which they promise you will get more miles from,not sure if you know about it,i'm going to try it as soon as I need a fill up.
    Originally posted by pat428
    But it costs more than normal fuel and Tesco don't guarantee results.
    • Brydav
    • By Brydav 31st Aug 10, 1:35 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    Brydav
    Martin says that when he does drive, it's often in urban traffic with a lot of sitting in queues. If that's your most common journey then buying a car with MHD (Micro hybrid drive AKA stop-start or mild Hybrid) should be your priority next time you buy a car. Essentially these are cars that switch the engine off when your stationary or crawling along, which is something you can't really do yourself in a normal car unless you're really not moving at all for a long time. They're not as complex as proper hybrids and you can even get a Smart car with MHD now.
    Originally posted by camaj

    Two long posts in a row! Apologies to anyone hoping for a quick read!

    From a pollution point of view, I agree with camaj that a hybrid engine makes more sense for someone making mostly urban trips.
    However, if Martin sticks with Smart, their quoted mpg figures for the MHD are still lower than those for the diesel engined car. This might be due to the additional weight of batteries etc. in a particularly small car.

    BTW - the Smart website quotes the same 85.6 mpg for urban, extra urban & combined in the diesel, which sounds unlikely but it still beats 54.3, 70.6 & 62.8 for the MHD.
  • Eric Pisch
    there's money saving and there's ground for divorce
    My Weight Loss Journey
    - Phase 1 2010
    - 180.8lbs in 47 Weeks
    - Phase 2 2011 - 51.6lbs Week 37 ¦ Fat Git 2 5K - 27.16's
    - Lean Muscle Gained - 4.0lbs
    - Total Loss - 236.4lbs
    This stuff will make you a god damned sexual Tyrannosaurus, just like me.
    • DKLS
    • By DKLS 31st Aug 10, 1:44 PM
    • 12,761 Posts
    • 21,519 Thanks
    DKLS
    Mine varies between 26-18mpg depending on driving style.
    • Brydav
    • By Brydav 31st Aug 10, 1:55 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    Brydav
    Mine varies between 26-18mpg depending on driving style.
    Originally posted by DKLS
    ... but you don't say what car it is. That would be very low if you drive a Prius, but exceptionally good for a Lamborghini!
    • Impet Limpet
    • By Impet Limpet 31st Aug 10, 1:55 PM
    • 688 Posts
    • 310 Thanks
    Impet Limpet
    Me and my b/f like to compare what our average MPG over a journey is, I usually win! Never in my life before this has it been acceptable to get to trafford centre and say "72.1mpg average IN YOUR FACE" to him! It is a diesel vRS and we love the thing!
  • kevpartner
    Is the experiment valid?
    I'd have thought that "Within this trial, there was one 50 miles round-trip outside London on the motorway, which is likely to have helped a little." would have made a big difference to the results: perhaps enough to even up experiments 2 and 3.

    I've found that the difference between urban and long trips is between 15 and 20% and that's all about acceleration. Acceleration is the key and judging by the speed of the people who drive up and down the road at the end of my cul-de-sac petrol isn't expensive enough yet!
    • DKLS
    • By DKLS 31st Aug 10, 4:45 PM
    • 12,761 Posts
    • 21,519 Thanks
    DKLS
    ... but you don't say what car it is. That would be very low if you drive a Prius, but exceptionally good for a Lamborghini!
    Originally posted by Brydav
    Sadly not a Lambo, and definitely not a Prius.
    I hired a Prius whilst on holiday and it was dire and I could only get 35mpg out of it at best.

    Mine is a twin turbo Subaru Forester with a performance few tweaks,
    • alanfp
    • By alanfp 31st Aug 10, 5:09 PM
    • 140 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    alanfp
    'super/premium' fuel
    A few weeks ago I filled up with the more expensive diesel, you know the stuff I mean- has different names depending on the supplier - about 5 % more expensive than the standard stuff.

    Very sceptical, but on a 15 mile journey I do every week at 37-38 mpg, I got 39.8 - so about break even.

    But on another journey (8 miles from a cold start) I always get 43-44mpg - I got 48.4mpg , so I was showing a small profit.

    Probably inconclusive overall and maybe it's different for each engine, but I reckon it's worth trying a tankfull.
  • emiff6
    I drive a 207 (2009), which I use mostly to get to work, 10 miles each way. I was fairly happy with 39mpg, but since I started using what I believe is called short shift, I now get 49mpg, according to the trip computer.

    I've also timed a lot of traffic lights in my area, and they are rarely on red for more than 30 seconds, unless at a very complicated junction, and then not more than a minute, so putting your foot down to beat the lights wastes petrol and saves no time at all.

    Lastly, since I rarely drive more than 70 or 80 miles at a time on the motorways, I now allow an extra 20 minutes for the journey, and drive at 60mph. This means I don't have to keep pulling out to pass lorries, which must reduce, in a small way, the distance travelled, I'm getting better fuel efficiency, and it is more relaxing, as I find the faster I go, the more I have to concentrate on other traffic.

    If I'm over the hill, where was the top?
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