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  • FIRST POST
    Bryony84
    Uncovered central heating pipes in house.
    • #1
    • 25th Jan 11, 9:31 PM
    Uncovered central heating pipes in house. 25th Jan 11 at 9:31 PM
    Just had a look round a potential rental property and the one thing that stood out to me as odd was that all the central heating pipes were exposed, running from the radiators up the walls to the next radiator upstairs. They were partially secured to the walls with plastic fixings but some were loose.

    Its not something I've ever see before so I was wondering how safe it is. These pipes get pretty hot and you could easily burn yourself on them (or other people/visiting children etc could).

    Just wondered if there are any regulations with such things?
Page 2
  • clutton
    encasing water-carrying pipes within plaster is madness in my view.... if a leak developes it will take a long time to show itself and do untold damage before being repaired... not to mention haeing to hack out and replaster .... a stunningly mucky job...

    most pipes are either boxed in so that a few screws give you access to the pipework or are under floorboards which are relatively easily, and cleanly, taken up.
    • ££sc££
    • By ££sc££ 26th Jan 11, 12:11 PM
    • 245 Posts
    • 124 Thanks
    ££sc££
    ex-council proeprties are often like this too. It's not a problem unless you don't like look. If you don't box them in and decorate to match
    • googler
    • By googler 26th Jan 11, 12:31 PM
    • 15,166 Posts
    • 9,976 Thanks
    googler
    1970s build, concrete ground floor and brick/blockwork walls, CH installed at time of build - pipework runs between ground and upper floor, in void between floorboards and ceiling, and down walls to meet rads at ground level.

    As previously said, the pipes don't get hotter than the radiators.....
    • Alias_Omega
    • By Alias_Omega 26th Jan 11, 12:36 PM
    • 7,259 Posts
    • 3,954 Thanks
    Alias_Omega
    B&Q and some Ty-Wraps / Zipties would be your friend..





    Easily fitted, can be fitted up to XYZ height to prevent little hands, and easily removed..
  • Bryony84
    Thanks all, maybe I did overreact a little to it, but neither myself or my partner have ever seen anything like this particular setup before. Maybe you are right and it is just because the pipes are shiny copper and there seem to be a lot of them, 2 sets in the living room running straight down the wall rather than in a corner. I did some investigation and the central heating was only installed this year, which would explain why it is like that.

    If the landlord isn't happy to cover them, I will ask if we can paint them. The landlord probably has no idea what they look like currently as he lives abroad. He has been renting the property to a friend but now that the friend is moving on, he is going with an agency to continue renting the property.
    • vikingaero
    • By vikingaero 26th Jan 11, 12:58 PM
    • 10,438 Posts
    • 13,122 Thanks
    vikingaero
    Think of the exposed pipework as another radiator!
    The man without a signature.
  • Blitz01
    Its just a very cheap installation - landlord job.
    Bit of a stupid comment.
    My house is over 450 years old, and i purposely didn't hide the copper piping.
    The floors are made of very expensive wood, and the ceilings beamed.

    Are they hidden in your bedsit
    • Soot2006
    • By Soot2006 26th Jan 11, 2:56 PM
    • 1,305 Posts
    • 1,352 Thanks
    Soot2006
    2 sets in the living room running straight down the wall rather than in a corner. I did some investigation and the central heating was only installed this year, which would explain why it is like that.
    This might have been intentional -- are they running up next to a window?
    I opted to NOT have my pipes running up in the corner, but instead straight up from the rad, alongside the windows. Firstly, I might want to put a corner cabinet in the corner while I'm unlikely to ever put anything right beside the window. Secondly, I intend to install ceiling to floor length curtains in the living rooms - get non-melt-able fabric and the pipes are hey presto hidden!
    • Toiletduck
    • By Toiletduck 26th Jan 11, 3:44 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    Toiletduck
    Bit of a stupid comment.
    My house is over 450 years old, and i purposely didn't hide the copper piping.
    The floors are made of very expensive wood, and the ceilings beamed.

    Are they hidden in your bedsit
    Originally posted by Blitz01

    I donít think itís a stupid comment at all. I dont live in a bedsit, I own my house and the pipes are very neatly concealed. In my previous experience of renting many different houses/flats over a period of ten years I regularly came across cheap surface mounted plumbing and wiring installations.

    However and I donít know why no-one else seems to notice this, it is simply a cosmetic issue as itís is impossible for the pipes supplying hot water to the radiators to be anything other than exactly the same temperature as the radiators themselves. Therefore there is no more risk of being burned on the exposed pipes than there is on the radiators themselves!!!
  • DVardysShadow
    If the visible pipework is running up the walls and through the ceiling to the floor above (as described by the OP)
    it's surely irrelevant whether the downstairs flooring is solid. The pipework could still have been cut into the walls.

    It is, as others have said, an installation done on the cheap.

    If you are thinking about taking the property ask the LL to confirm in writing that all loose pipework will be properly affixed to the wall before you move in.
    Originally posted by tbs624
    The last thing I would do with pipework is cut it into a wall.Firstly, there is a risk of puncturing it [which is a risk you might not want if you rented a house out]. And every joint which is buried is a potential point of failure.

    There are discrete ways of running pipework which minimize the visual effect. For example behind curtains if you have the rads under windows rather than on inside walls

    As tenant, I think I would rather the landlord did not do too much to fix the pipework down - better to note it as loose on the inventory, possibly.
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