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    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 9th May 19, 7:38 AM
    • 39Posts
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    Green garnet
    Sheltered Housing Local Authority Criteria
    • #1
    • 9th May 19, 7:38 AM
    Sheltered Housing Local Authority Criteria 9th May 19 at 7:38 AM
    I have heard something which does not sound quite right. Turned down for sheltered housing because mental health not taken into account - told others with physical disabilities will always have more points and priority. The person has disability benefits for mental health for many years.

    Is it not the case that mental health is given the same 'status' (sorry if this is the wrong word) as other health criteria, such as physical disabilities?

    If the information that 'mental health' not taken into account in the assessment is right enough it seems to put the elderly person with longstanding mental health at a disadvantage. There would be no prospect of getting suitable housing. The person cannot afford to sell and buy a suitable home as the present home, which has a low value, is unsuitable and not enough points were allocated to be close enough to be considered for Local Authority sheltered housing.

    Thanks for any knowledge about this.

    Green garnet
    Last edited by Green garnet; 09-05-2019 at 8:05 AM.
Page 1
    • cattie
    • By cattie 9th May 19, 1:47 PM
    • 7,979 Posts
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    cattie
    • #2
    • 9th May 19, 1:47 PM
    • #2
    • 9th May 19, 1:47 PM
    I think it could depend on which council as they all have different criteria. In my previous borough I know it was fairly normal to offer sheltered accomodation to those who had quite severe & enduring mental health problems, especially if they were in unsuitable accomodation or became homeless due to being in hospital for some time.
    The bigger the bargain, the better I feel.

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    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 9th May 19, 2:28 PM
    • 39 Posts
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    Green garnet
    • #3
    • 9th May 19, 2:28 PM
    • #3
    • 9th May 19, 2:28 PM
    That is helpful to know, thanks cattie. I thought there would be something consistent about treating people equally with either mental or physical health issues - and it would apply across all local authorities.

    It seemed strange to me that they would assess, exclude mental health and focus only on physical problems.

    Green garnet
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 9th May 19, 4:41 PM
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    GlasweJen
    • #4
    • 9th May 19, 4:41 PM
    • #4
    • 9th May 19, 4:41 PM
    I think it would depend on what the sheltered housing is. In Glasgow some is for over 55s only and if you're young you're gubbed, some is zoned as mental health, some is wheelchair or other mobility aids users only, some is for learning disabilities etc. There's no point giving a bipolar 30 year old a ground floor wheelchair accessible flat in a retirement village is there?

    Has a needs assessment taken place?
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    • nicetomeetyou
    • By nicetomeetyou 9th May 19, 5:14 PM
    • 187 Posts
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    nicetomeetyou
    • #5
    • 9th May 19, 5:14 PM
    • #5
    • 9th May 19, 5:14 PM
    I know for my local authority to get sheltered housing when your under 55 years old you need either a psychical disability or a learning disability. Mental health isn't taken into account unless you have input from secondary mental health services, i.e. supporting letter from the CMHT.

    It's the same for bus passes here. If you have mental health issues / high functioning ASD and your not receiving support from social services or mental health psychiatric services you won't be entitled to a bus pass or it is harder to get a bus pass.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 9th May 19, 6:55 PM
    • 6,734 Posts
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    sheramber
    • #6
    • 9th May 19, 6:55 PM
    • #6
    • 9th May 19, 6:55 PM
    Why is the current house unsuitable?

    Could adaptions be made to make it suitable?
    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 9th May 19, 7:11 PM
    • 39 Posts
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    Green garnet
    • #7
    • 9th May 19, 7:11 PM
    • #7
    • 9th May 19, 7:11 PM
    Thanks for all the replies. Not sure what local criteria involve but elderly person struggling to cope alone at home. Mental health so Warden support wanted but physical adaptations to present accommodation not helpful as not needed.

    It seems housing staff said letter from a GP or Specialist would probably not help as no priority or consideration given for mental health needs. ? Needs assessment was only for physical needs so not appropriate - as far as I know.

    I thought it did not sound right but maybe their local policy is for physical disabilities. If so I thought that inequality would not be allowed.

    Green garnet
    Last edited by Green garnet; 09-05-2019 at 7:18 PM.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 9th May 19, 7:22 PM
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    sheramber
    • #8
    • 9th May 19, 7:22 PM
    • #8
    • 9th May 19, 7:22 PM
    There are no resident wardens at the sheltered housing in my area. Due to costs they have been dispensed with.

    the occupants get a phone call at 9am asking if they are okay and that is it.
    • nicetomeetyou
    • By nicetomeetyou 9th May 19, 7:31 PM
    • 187 Posts
    • 71 Thanks
    nicetomeetyou
    • #9
    • 9th May 19, 7:31 PM
    • #9
    • 9th May 19, 7:31 PM
    In my town they have different developments that cater for different needs. We housing with adaptations for people with limited mobility, we have flats for elderly with day room plus we have flats for people with learning disabilities and mental health difficulties with on-site warden. I live in supported housing that is run by a care company and since social services are moving towards direct payments a lot of our tenants are moving into council run sheltered housing and purchasing their own support with their care budget.
    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 9th May 19, 8:21 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Green garnet
    It sounds as if cutbacks are hard on everyone although nicetomeetyou #9 seems to show some still do provide much needed support.

    I wonder if anyone knows if it really is O.K. for a Local Authority to favour physical over mental health needs to the extent of excluding mental health from sheltered housing assessment. Thanks.

    Green garnet
    • nicetomeetyou
    • By nicetomeetyou 9th May 19, 8:40 PM
    • 187 Posts
    • 71 Thanks
    nicetomeetyou
    I wonder if anyone knows if it really is O.K. for a Local Authority to favour physical over mental health needs to the extent of excluding mental health from sheltered housing assessment. Thanks.
    Originally posted by Green garnet
    It shouldn't matter if you have a physical disability or learning/mental health disability. It used to go on if you received mid/high rate DLA you met the criteria for sheltered housing. Back in 2005 when I got my first bungalow on a sheltered housing area I met the criteria as I got high rate DLA for a learning disability. The council didn't do a in-depth assessment at all. This was before bidding for properties and I got offered a bungalow which I took (it was a mistake at the time as I was the youngest on the street by 30 years and I become isolated) I don't know if they operate the DLA criteria now but I should think they still do?

    Have you looked into housing association in your area.. They have properties / complex/flats/bungalows for people with disabilities. They might be more available than council properties.
    Last edited by nicetomeetyou; 09-05-2019 at 8:43 PM.
    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 10th May 19, 5:04 AM
    • 39 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Green garnet
    It shouldn't matter if you have a physical disability or learning/mental health disability. It used to go on if you received mid/high rate DLA you met the criteria for sheltered housing. Back in 2005 when I got my first bungalow on a sheltered housing area I met the criteria as I got high rate DLA for a learning disability. The council didn't do a in-depth assessment at all. This was before bidding for properties and I got offered a bungalow which I took (it was a mistake at the time as I was the youngest on the street by 30 years and I become isolated) I don't know if they operate the DLA criteria now but I should think they still do?

    Have you looked into housing association in your area.. They have properties / complex/flats/bungalows for people with disabilities. They might be more available than council properties.
    Originally posted by nicetomeetyou
    It is an elderly person with longstanding mental health. I just feel sorry they are feellng brushed off. As I mentioned - it does not seem quite right to me not to be more 'included' at assessment. I must be wrong but I really thought this 'disadvantage' because of mental health would not be allowed - especially in a Local Authority Sheltered Housing.

    I only have limited information and don't know if any other option is available.

    I hope you are happy with your housing.

    Thanks for replying.

    Green garnet
    • Prinzessilein
    • By Prinzessilein 10th May 19, 7:45 AM
    • 2,823 Posts
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    Prinzessilein
    I live in sheltered housing...I am a good few years off the 'usual' age for this particular place , but I was granted a place because it was the most appropriate way to meet my physical disability needs.

    Whilst I also have mental health conditions, these did not give me extra 'points' on the housing criteria. In fact, sheltered housing is NOT considered as an option for more serious mental health issues in this are, as we no longer have live-in wardens. (We have wardens who come in Monday-Friday for a set number of hours).

    Perhaps the OP's mother would find her needs better met in some sort of residential care? ...Or would regular carer visits allow her to stay in her own home?...I think a full needs assessment is advisable.
    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 10th May 19, 1:24 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Green garnet
    Thanks Prinzessilein. As far as I know (not privy to all the information though) it is not a major psychotic type of illness - more longstanding not curable but treatable type of mental health - with some relapses. The person is, when well enough, out and about most days and has regular out patient appointments.


    It just seems a pity that the elderly person really does feel brushed off and considered less in need than folks with other health (physical) problems who have priority. I guess it is 'the system.' Thank you for replying.


    Green garnet
    Last edited by Green garnet; 11-05-2019 at 4:32 AM.
    • Bananas123
    • By Bananas123 21st May 19, 4:39 AM
    • 312 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    Bananas123
    told others with physical disabilities will always have more points and priority.
    Originally posted by Green garnet
    the above is highly discriminatory BUT
    The person is, when well enough, out and about most days and has regular out patient appointments.
    Originally posted by Green garnet
    pretty sure sheltered accommadation is for people with less functioning then the above statement...
    • K80 Black
    • By K80 Black 22nd May 19, 12:48 PM
    • 413 Posts
    • 854 Thanks
    K80 Black
    There are supported accommodation places run by charities in many areas - I live in a flat run by one, and it's totally covered by my housing benefit. I am on the lowest tier of support, which involves a home visit once a week, but they also have accommodation with 24hr live in staff and a things in between. This might be an option if the council aren't helpful? Mine was recommended to me by my mental health team after I struggled to keep a normal tenancy - I'd get them to speak to their social worker, this sort of thing is right up their alley!
    • Green garnet
    • By Green garnet 22nd May 19, 3:22 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Green garnet
    the above is highly discriminatory BUT

    pretty sure sheltered accommadation is for people with less functioning then the above statement...
    Originally posted by Bananas123
    Just out of interest, Bananas, I also think it is discriminatory but in what way and how to demonstrate it? I have stepped back a bit from the situation (did my best to find out if it was allowed and failed.)

    It seems to be that Local Authorities set their own critetia when allocating places. Are there set guidelines or anything to show that it is not right or fair?

    Thanks.
    Green garnet
    • Towser
    • By Towser 24th May 19, 2:53 PM
    • 1,287 Posts
    • 2,330 Thanks
    Towser
    At what age can you put your name on the waiting list?
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