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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Rebecca
    • By Former MSE Rebecca 11th Nov 14, 10:48 AM
    • 113Posts
    • 96Thanks
    Former MSE Rebecca
    It's aitch not haitch
    • #1
    • 11th Nov 14, 10:48 AM
    It's aitch not haitch 11th Nov 14 at 10:48 AM
    Does it drive you up the wall when people 'literally' die laughing? Or how about those who give 110%?



    Check out Martin's top 10 list for word pedants

    Hit "reply" to add yours!

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 06-10-2017 at 12:02 PM.
Page 47
    • purpoise
    • By purpoise 5th May 19, 9:24 PM
    • 101 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    purpoise
    Beat on
    After English had already established itself in the USA the German speakers were the biggest (until now anyway) linguistic group to get there. Add to that the Jewish influence.

    I'm not sure about Yiddish but usually the German type prepositions are employed.

    The prepositions got very confused as the two languges were so similair.
    (Something like >70% of our used language is derived from German.)
    A verb like 'Aufschlagen' (to hit something 'on') is a composite of 'auf'(preposition) and 'schlagen' (verb).


    The problem is that 'auf' can be translated as On or Up.
    I have heard Americans say 'I hit him up the knee.'
    • purpoise
    • By purpoise 5th May 19, 9:51 PM
    • 101 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    purpoise
    the steady demise of the adveb
    Seen in an Asda window, "Products made fresh in our store."
    So if I bring in a stale loaf....


    Q."How are you?"
    A. "I'm good!"
    Reply. "I didn't ask what you think of youself!"
    • purpoise
    • By purpoise 5th May 19, 10:44 PM
    • 101 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    purpoise
    Seen in a Lidl store:
    "Recycled Toilet Paper
    4 Ply
    10 x 160
    £3.99"
    I just wonder how they source the raw material?
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 7th May 19, 9:29 AM
    • 26,728 Posts
    • 70,400 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Wrexham is promoting its music festival with beautiful banners boasting of:

    Three arena's.......

    Oh, dear.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 7th May 19, 1:23 PM
    • 2,971 Posts
    • 15,147 Thanks
    NBLondon
    I have heard Americans say 'I hit him up the knee.'
    Originally posted by purpoise
    That might be Black English (aka Ebonics)? Or as Lonnie Donegan once sang "He punched him up the throat"
    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 8th May 19, 11:25 AM
    • 2,114 Posts
    • 5,220 Thanks
    NaughtiusMaximus
    Dear royal baby announcer

    This time is wrong!


    1 - There should be a colon between the hours and minutes
    2 - Appending 'am' or 'pm' to a 24 hour time is superfluous, it should be written as either 05:26 or 5:26 am (please note the space before 'am')

    Please pay more attention in future.

    Yours faithfully

    NM
    Last edited by NaughtiusMaximus; 08-05-2019 at 11:27 AM.
    • Morbier
    • By Morbier 8th May 19, 3:47 PM
    • 274 Posts
    • 330 Thanks
    Morbier
    Naughtius Maximus, I'm with you on that one. However, what about the date at the bottom - shouldn't there be a 'th' after the 6. Bit too 'American' for me without it.

    But I may be wrong; I'm never sure of the correct way to write a date, despite being told during shorthand lessons many, many years ago.
    I can't imagine a life without cheese. (Nigel Slater)
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 8th May 19, 4:01 PM
    • 2,114 Posts
    • 5,220 Thanks
    NaughtiusMaximus
    Naughtius Maximus, I'm with you on that one. However, what about the date at the bottom - shouldn't there be a 'th' after the 6. Bit too 'American' for me without it.

    But I may be wrong; I'm never sure of the correct way to write a date, despite being told during shorthand lessons many, many years ago.
    Originally posted by Morbier
    Yes I think there should be, I didn't spot that.

    I think Americans would write May 6th rather than 6th May.
    • Morbier
    • By Morbier 8th May 19, 4:23 PM
    • 274 Posts
    • 330 Thanks
    Morbier
    Yes I think there should be, I didn't spot that.

    I think Americans would write May 6th rather than 6th May.
    Originally posted by NaughtiusMaximus
    I think I'm confusing the way Americans say the date (as opposed to writing it). They would say 'six May'. I think!

    I vaguely remember being told to separate the numbers with the month, as you say - 6th May 2019. Why? Who knows?!
    I can't imagine a life without cheese. (Nigel Slater)
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 8th May 19, 4:40 PM
    • 2,821 Posts
    • 3,790 Thanks
    Robisere
    American English is also derived from the Elizabethan English used by the original English colonists and was significantly different in some ways.

    However, I find that many "Americanisms" introduced into English and imported here, only prove that English is a living, evolving language and used all over the world by a majority of nations. The same goes for influences from the Commonwealth. Witness the poor, unrepresented French, who object so strongly to Anglicisation* of their language: there have been many campaigns against efforts such as "Le weekend" by the French media and hoary old French professors.

    *And witness my spellchecker trying to Americanise "Anglicisation" and "Americanise". Not having it! No ZEDS, never mind ZEES, allowed!
    I think this job really needs
    a much bigger hammer.
    • Morbier
    • By Morbier 8th May 19, 5:54 PM
    • 274 Posts
    • 330 Thanks
    Morbier
    Les Immortels of the Academie Française are the 'hoary old French professors' whose job it is to cast a very close eye on the development (or otherwise) of French.

    Personally, I don't mind 'Le weekend' etc as it's less for me to learn but I can see their point. French is a beautiful-sounding language and English phrases cast among it sound terrible.

    As we all know, language changes - but it's nice to have a moan. Innit?

    (Yes, I know there should be an acute accent over the first 'e' in Academie but all I get is an exclamation mark)
    I can't imagine a life without cheese. (Nigel Slater)
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 10th May 19, 11:22 AM
    • 2,971 Posts
    • 15,147 Thanks
    NBLondon
    0526 hours doesn't need the colon - you'd think a military chap like Harry would know that...

    06 May, 2019 looks to me like a default setting/ auto correction from Microsoft Word being used. I'd say 6 May 2019 or 6th May 2019 are fine but May 6th, 2019 with a comma.

    The US/UK thing is more troublesome in all numbers - 06/05/19 here, 05/06/19 there (and 19/05/06 in other parts of the world). One of my teachers would have written it 5.vi.2019 to make it clear which was the month - don't know if that was an archaic version or how he was taught in his schooldays or just him being eccentric.
    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 10th May 19, 2:10 PM
    • 26,728 Posts
    • 70,400 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I always dinned into my classes that they should write the month in full to avoid any American/British confusion.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Dippypud
    • By Dippypud 10th May 19, 4:53 PM
    • 1,815 Posts
    • 16,917 Thanks
    Dippypud
    Similarly - "can I lend your pencil?" when it should have been "can I borrow your pencil?" I'm tempted to reply, "No, you can't lend my pencil, I'll decide who I lend my pencil to." (Or even 'to whom I'll lend my pencil' if I'm being really picky).
    Originally posted by Morbier
    Surely, it should be 'may I borrow a pencil ?'
    C.R.A.P.R.O.L.L.Z # 40 spanner supervisor.
    No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thought.
    Only after the last tree has been cut down. Only after the last fish has been caught. Only after the last river has been poisoned. Only then will you realize that money cannot be eaten.
    "l! ilyë yantë ranya nar vanwë"
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 13th May 19, 8:28 AM
    • 2,971 Posts
    • 15,147 Thanks
    NBLondon
    Agreed - "May I?" asks permission - "Can I?" asks about possibility or ability. Thus:

    Can I borrow a pencil?
    Yes you can.
    [Pause]
    Where is it then?
    I don't have a pencil.
    You said I could borrow one!
    Yes - you can. But not from me as I don't have one.
    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    • purpoise
    • By purpoise 2nd Jun 19, 8:24 AM
    • 101 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    purpoise
    The latest brainless American import.
    I was screaming at the radio again this morning.
    Val mcDermid, of all people (she is a writer) used the phrase, "when I was little....".
    What's wrong with, "when I was young?" Why conflate size with naivete?
    I'm sure Warwick Davis has never once said, "When I was little...."
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 4th Jun 19, 7:23 AM
    • 26,728 Posts
    • 70,400 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I tried to quote purpoise's post, but the screen came out stretched with minute print.

    I don't have any problem with it Val McDermid's use of 'when I was little.' That means she was a child. 'Young' could suggest in her 20s/30s.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 5th Jun 19, 10:33 AM
    • 2,971 Posts
    • 15,147 Thanks
    NBLondon
    Sort of... Yes - "when I was young" could mean teens or 20s from the perspective of a person in their 50s "When I was little" is possibly a contraction of "When I was a little girl" which implies under about 12.

    I'd say "when I was a child" or "When I was a teenager" would be more specific.
    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 5th Jun 19, 9:18 PM
    • 2,821 Posts
    • 3,790 Thanks
    Robisere
    The Pedants' Revolt appears to have commenced.....

    Meanwhile: Morbier - " (Yes, I know there should be an acute accent over the first 'e' in Academie but all I get is an exclamation mark) "

    Have you tried the Microsoft Character Map? Available to install in Win7, don't know about 10. Trying it -
    Acad!mie - no doesn't work, sorry!
    I think this job really needs
    a much bigger hammer.
    • Morbier
    • By Morbier 5th Jun 19, 10:55 PM
    • 274 Posts
    • 330 Thanks
    Morbier
    The Pedants' Revolt appears to have commenced.....

    Meanwhile: Morbier - " (Yes, I know there should be an acute accent over the first 'e' in Academie but all I get is an exclamation mark) "

    Have you tried the Microsoft Character Map? Available to install in Win7, don't know about 10. Trying it -
    Acad!mie - no doesn't work, sorry!
    Originally posted by Robisere
    Thanks for the attempt at helping me. I'm happy to say that I gave up Windows years ago and am now a confirmed Apple addict. However there is an equivalent to the Character Map. I'm on my iPad at the moment and, even though I used the 'e' with an accute accent, it didn't work. I'll have a go on my laptop and let you know. I suspect it's the MSE gremlin.
    I can't imagine a life without cheese. (Nigel Slater)
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