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  • FIRST POST
    • loulou41
    • By loulou41 27th Sep 18, 10:20 PM
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    loulou41
    5 yrs old hates swimming lessons
    • #1
    • 27th Sep 18, 10:20 PM
    5 yrs old hates swimming lessons 27th Sep 18 at 10:20 PM
    My 5 yrs old grandson had 3 courses of intensive swimming lessons in a small group. He did ok as the teacher was very patient. He just started a 10 wk course of swimming lesson in the same pool but with a different teacher and he hates it. He cries and seems unhappy and does not like to put his face under the water. My daughter does not know what to do as it hurts to see her little boy miserable. She is a very good swimmer and swam at national level and was not confident when she was his age. Should she persevere or give up and try later on? The lesson is not cheap at £10 for 30 mins. There is also the option of 1 to 1 at £30. Thanks
Page 2
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 12th Nov 18, 9:24 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    I agree that children should learn to swim.

    However, as the little lad is so upset, why can't he just be in the pool with his mum, just having fun, until he learns to be more confident? It doesn't matter if he doesn't do the strokes 'correctly', surely, at his age, he can learn that when he is older. It is more important that he feels comfortable in the water.
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 12th Nov 18, 10:00 AM
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    AnotherJoe
    Swimming could be a lifesaver.
    Originally posted by Money maker
    Common myth. Far more people who can swim drown, than those who can't.

    Three lessons a week for someone who hates it sounds tortuous, stop trying to replicate what mum did with the children. Better to go somewhere he can just play and get comfortable in the water without it being half an hour of misery (and three times a week is even worse).

    So what if you've paid the lessons, that's a sunk cost, that moneys gone. I second seven-day-weekend, get her to take him to the pool and just play. Once he's comfortable in the water he'll learn easily.
    Please dont criticise my spelling. It's excellent. Its my typing that's bad.
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 12th Nov 18, 12:45 PM
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    badmemory
    Personally I would save the forcing for going to school & learning to read. After all a child who doesn't like water is unlikely to walk so close to the edge of a canal that they fall in, but a child who can't read a word like bleach can be in big trouble.


    Did you try just covering his ears? What was the response?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 12th Nov 18, 5:09 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    After all a child who doesn't like water is unlikely to walk so close to the edge of a canal that they fall in, but a child who can't read a word like bleach can be in big trouble.

    Originally posted by badmemory
    I think that really minimises the risk of drowning and isnít at all realistic.
    • Rubik
    • By Rubik 13th Nov 18, 3:28 PM
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    Rubik

    Three lessons a week for someone who hates it sounds tortuous, stop trying to replicate what mum did with the children. Better to go somewhere he can just play and get comfortable in the water without it being half an hour of misery (and three times a week is even worse).

    So what if you've paid the lessons, that's a sunk cost, that moneys gone. I second seven-day-weekend, get her to take him to the pool and just play. Once he's comfortable in the water he'll learn easily.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    ^^^^ this, a hundred times.

    Continuing to make [force] him to attend the lessons when so very clearly hates then is counter-productive. He will learn to associate swimming and water with his distress (if he hasn't already done so).

    IMO, making him go is abusive.

    Just because one parent enjoyed swimming doesn't mean a child will.
    Last edited by Rubik; 13-11-2018 at 3:32 PM.
    • HelpfulHetty
    • By HelpfulHetty 23rd Nov 18, 4:58 AM
    • 3 Posts
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    HelpfulHetty
    It seems a bit odd that your daughter has block booked a load of new lessons under the circumstances. Can we have an update on how he's got on?
    • Tammer
    • By Tammer 25th Nov 18, 4:19 PM
    • 330 Posts
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    Tammer
    Hi,

    My own is experience is that my son did not like swimming lessons but was semi-ok to do them until the block finished. We didn't renew as he wasn't enjoying it at all.

    I feel that it's important that kids learn to swim - we go on holidays with pools etc and near rivers and lochs / lakes / the sea so want him to be able to swim a little.

    I decided I would take him to the pool once a week. I brought some rubber ducks and would play games with him - get him to rescue the duck etc. and see if he can get it when I hold it underwater.

    Over time he got his confidence in the water and can now do a length of the pool, as long as he's following me. He still has a long way to go but he is still really reluctant to go to swimming lessons and I've not wanted to put him off swimming as he likes it when he goes with me, his mum or with one of us and a pal.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 25th Nov 18, 4:21 PM
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    PasturesNew
    Having had a start - with the mother's background/history it'd be much better to just spend the money on having fun water-based playtimes. It's not like she's unable or uncomfortable being in the water.
    • TomokoAdhami
    • By TomokoAdhami 20th Dec 18, 9:05 AM
    • 24 Posts
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    TomokoAdhami
    You shouldn't force him to take swimming lessons. I think as parents; we are applying aggressive strategies to teach them something. Why don't you swim and enjoy in front of him? Parents should teach their kids with practical actions instead of putting pressure on kids.

    Ignore the age limits to learn swimming because everyone wants to make his/her kids strong enough.
    • Frugalgirl
    • By Frugalgirl 8th Jan 19, 2:05 PM
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    Frugalgirl
    The lifeguard at my local pool told me that children undergo a change around 4 years old. Before that they know how to breathe under water but after they unlearn it and don't know how to do it. Maybe that has happened.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 11th Jan 19, 10:04 AM
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    Red-Squirrel
    The lifeguard at my local pool told me that children undergo a change around 4 years old. Before that they know how to breathe under water but after they unlearn it and don't know how to do it. Maybe that has happened.
    Originally posted by Frugalgirl
    If that's really what he told you its a bit alarming that a lifeguard thinks young children can actually breathe underwater!

    Hopefully what he was talking about was the 'diving reflex' that babies have that means they instinctively hold their breath and lower their heart rate when submerged in water, but this is only true up until about 6 months old.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 11th Jan 19, 11:07 AM
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    seven-day-weekend
    I hate swimming and in fact I hate going in water generally, especially swimming pools, they are so big and blue and look deep and I am convinced they are going to drown me.. I don't know where this fear sprang from, I have never been comfortable with it. I did learn to swim when I was in my 40s, to see if that would combat the fear but it hasn't.

    Don't make this little boy like me, fearful of water still at 69 years of age. Just let him have fun.
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 15th Jan 19, 9:21 AM
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    hazyjo
    Do they go abroad? If there's a pool, I've always found it a brilliant place for kids to learn (at least not to be frightened of water!). I remember loving it on holiday when I was about 5 or 6. I also remember taking my ex BF's son to Tenerife who was scared of the water and getting his head under, but after a day or two, me and him were playing for ages in the water, and he made a friend and they were doing all these different shaped jumps into the water and loving it. Couldn't get him out by the end of the holiday!
    2019 wins: Bottle of Prosecco; Popcorn Shed popcorn...
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