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  • FIRST POST
    • JackeeBoy
    • By JackeeBoy 13th May 19, 3:26 PM
    • 117Posts
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    JackeeBoy
    Is there a bonafide way to stop cats and foxes coming into my garden?
    • #1
    • 13th May 19, 3:26 PM
    Is there a bonafide way to stop cats and foxes coming into my garden? 13th May 19 at 3:26 PM
    It's one of the main things stopping me from enjoying my garden. It's now especially more disgusting now that I have artificial grass. I have tried using the sound blasters etc., but cats keep coming in and I swear then pick on my garden. I just wish owners were more considerate and kept their bloody pests inside.

    I have put spikes around on the fence and though it did initially deter them from using certain entry points, the always find a way around or just get used to it. What can I do?

    The only thing I can think of is getting very high fences (I can currently see over mine) and putting prison-style barbedwire all over.
Page 3
    • Robby1988
    • By Robby1988 17th May 19, 7:23 AM
    • 130 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    Robby1988
    It’s not realistic to expect cats to be kept indoors, their natural instinct is to be outside roaming. We have a litter tray, the cat doesn’t always use it and I know full well it is pooping outside sometimes, but there is naff all I can do about it. It’s nature, just like the bird crap all over my car and the bloody dog next door that barks.

    If cats were not kept as pets they would still be roaming about as stray wild animals like you see in many foreign countries, mating and breeding on a larger scale.

    Like the story in the press recently about people fixing spikes to tree branches to stop birds pooing in their cars, it’s sad how anti-nature people are in pursuit of a pristine garden & car.
    • Robby1988
    • By Robby1988 17th May 19, 7:39 AM
    • 130 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    Robby1988
    For the record, my opinions aside I would work with any neighbour that approached me sensibly with a complaint about the cat.

    The crystal things that give off a scent the cats don’t like can work, however require upkeep. I’d certainly be happy to fund this upkeep if it stopped some deranged garden obsessed neighbour murdering my pet.
    • ed110220
    • By ed110220 17th May 19, 12:10 PM
    • 1,180 Posts
    • 627 Thanks
    ed110220
    Itís not realistic to expect cats to be kept indoors, their natural instinct is to be outside roaming. We have a litter tray, the cat doesnít always use it and I know full well it is pooping outside sometimes, but there is naff all I can do about it. Itís nature, just like the bird crap all over my car and the bloody dog next door that barks.

    If cats were not kept as pets they would still be roaming about as stray wild animals like you see in many foreign countries, mating and breeding on a larger scale.

    Like the story in the press recently about people fixing spikes to tree branches to stop birds pooing in their cars, itís sad how anti-nature people are in pursuit of a pristine garden & car.
    Originally posted by Robby1988
    Being against cats roaming about isn't anti-nature. Domestic and feral cats are not native and do quite a bit of damage to nature by hunting wildlife and in Scotland interbreeding with the native and endangered wild cat. In the wild a predator like a cat would only exist at very low densities with each one having a big territory (probably hundredths of the density of domestic cats).

    Nature is the wood pigeons that sometimes eat my vegetables and fruit, which is annoying but something I accept because they are wild animals. Cats are someone's responsibility.

    If I had a pet baboon or raccoon or something else unusual and it went scratching up and carping all over the neighbours gardens it would be considered unacceptable, but cats get a free pass.
    • Rusty Shackleton
    • By Rusty Shackleton 17th May 19, 12:59 PM
    • 438 Posts
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    Rusty Shackleton
    If I had a pet baboon or raccoon or something else unusual and it went scratching up and carping all over the neighbours gardens it would be considered unacceptable, but cats get a free pass.
    Originally posted by ed110220
    Because cats are nothing like having a raccoon or a baboon - the former carries disease and the latter can easily (and severely) injure an adult/kill a child. When was the last time you heard of a domestic cat injuring or killing a human?

    In all seriousness, what harm do cats actually do?

    "scratching up" your garden? are scratches on trees really such a problem? I'd argue a cat has far more right to scratch a tree (again, exhibiting natural behaviour) than you have a right for your view of a tree to be slightly more pleasant!

    As for crapping over gardens, that's not really true is it? Most cats bury it, and plenty of other wild animals will crap in your garden regardless. I've found a few cat poos in my garden over time, it's hardly a big deal and far less intrusive in the garden than the amount splattered everywhere by the pigeons, but then I like the tree they also like, so have to make my peace with it!
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 17th May 19, 2:51 PM
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    Fire Fox
    Being against cats roaming about isn't anti-nature. Domestic and feral cats are not native and do quite a bit of damage to nature by hunting wildlife and in Scotland interbreeding with the native and endangered wild cat. In the wild a predator like a cat would only exist at very low densities with each one having a big territory (probably hundredths of the density of domestic cats).
    Originally posted by ed110220
    Domestic pet cats are concentrated in urban and suburban neighbourhoods. There is very little natural or wild about either environment. Humans have absolutely decimated these areas.

    Similarly the damage to nature and wildlife in domestic gardens is almost entirely human. We 'cherry pick' the wild species we want, we interfere with natural selection by feeding and taming birds, we destroy habitats by mowing the lawn, pulling up weeds wild flowers and planting non-native species.

    Domestic cats in very rural areas are more likely to be farm cats or feral cats than pet cats.The purpose of a working farm cat is to hunt wildlife AKA control vermin. Whose responsibility are feral cats?

    There are trap-neuter-release programmes for feral colonies across the UK. Sick and disease carrying (eg. FLV, FIV) feral cats are destroyed not re-released. Have you considered donating to or volunteering for a TNR programme in your area?

    Nature is the wood pigeons that sometimes eat my vegetables and fruit, which is annoying but something I accept because they are wild animals. Cats are someone's responsibility.

    If I had a pet baboon or raccoon or something else unusual and it went scratching up and carping all over the neighbours gardens it would be considered unacceptable, but cats get a free pass.
    Originally posted by ed110220
    Wood pigeons are widely considered to be agricultural pests, causing millions of pounds of damage to rural livelihoods each year. It has long been legal to shoot them for that very reason [review expected].

    Cats? Not In My Back Yard. Rodents and wood pigeons? Aunt Sally.
    Last edited by Fire Fox; 17-05-2019 at 2:56 PM.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Trainee Rosie the Riveter.
    • troffasky
    • By troffasky 17th May 19, 10:05 PM
    • 155 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    troffasky
    Wood pigeons are widely considered to be agricultural pests,
    Originally posted by Fire Fox

    When I see a plump wood pigeon waddling around in my garden, I feel...hungry. Not sure if the effort of plucking and all the little bones is worth it though.
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 18th May 19, 7:13 AM
    • 1,353 Posts
    • 1,120 Thanks
    Apodemus
    Because cats are nothing like having a raccoon or a baboon - the former carries disease...
    Originally posted by Rusty Shackleton
    Oh no, donít pick at that scab, this thread is far enough off topic already!
    • no1catman
    • By no1catman 19th May 19, 3:55 PM
    • 2,824 Posts
    • 2,109 Thanks
    no1catman
    You might find you suddenly get a rodent problem if all your neighbors got rid of the cats.
    I live in a rural area and a stream runs down the back of the houses on my lane, my neighbor hates cats but is still very grateful I have them as we don't have a rodent problem anymore due to them!
    So yes, I think I do actually need a cat
    I get stray cats around my house too, and I turn the hose on them

    OP - are you sure it is cat poo on the grass - cats tend to go in soil where they can bury it?
    Originally posted by Tammykitty
    Yes, I do find this odd, my first cat like do her 'business' outside - always dug and buried it never on the lawn. Indeed the only time we ever saw it - was when snow thawed. Previous cat - don't know terraced house - no lawn, but in the short time at new house, again not on lawn. Current cat, goes around the borders, or (if she can) in the greenhouse, never on the lawn - has been known to venture next door - to dig. But they are laid back about it, used to look after the cat the other side, and new people there have a cat.
    After all, a home is not complete without a cat.
    I used to work for Tesco - now retired - speciality Clubcard
    • ukjoel
    • By ukjoel 19th May 19, 4:24 PM
    • 1,422 Posts
    • 1,275 Thanks
    ukjoel
    cat
    When I was a student the students next door (not us of course) had similar issues.

    They had a small kids paddling pool.

    The stuck a plate of cat food in the middle.

    Surrounded cat food with contents of some paint they bought.

    They put it out at night and brought it back in first thing.

    Cats ate food, cats stepped in paint (which from memory was non toxic), cats went home, owners came down next morning and carpets were covered in cat footprints in a shade of colours.

    Cats not let out again.
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 20th May 19, 6:25 PM
    • 5,178 Posts
    • 5,978 Thanks
    robatwork
    When I was a student the students next door (not us of course) had similar issues.

    They had a small kids paddling pool.

    The stuck a plate of cat food in the middle.

    Surrounded cat food with contents of some paint they bought.

    They put it out at night and brought it back in first thing.

    Cats ate food, cats stepped in paint (which from memory was non toxic), cats went home, owners came down next morning and carpets were covered in cat footprints in a shade of colours.

    Cats not let out again.
    Originally posted by ukjoel
    Your neighbours were tw@s
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 20th May 19, 7:26 PM
    • 28,415 Posts
    • 100,142 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Your neighbours were tw@s
    Originally posted by robatwork
    Ficticious tw@ts too.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • EmmyLou30
    • By EmmyLou30 21st May 19, 9:53 AM
    • 473 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    EmmyLou30
    Cat owners need to train their cats to use the litter tray, then they rarely poo outside and cause a nuisance to others. I find that those cats that use my garden as a toilet come from houses who don't have litter trays because the lazy owners would prefer to never have to clean up their cat's disgusting smelling faeces. For them the fact their cat uses all the other gardens as a litter tray is heaven as they don't use their own garden to do it in.


    For me it means never gardening without gloves as it can be hiding under the surface, they do it on my plants and kill them, on the lawn, on the gravel down the side of the drive and I've tried everything. Nothing works on all the cats. The worst offender has recently moved out and my daily job of picking it up is now an occasional annoyance and I am so happy! It was making me angrier than you can possibly imagine to have to do their job of cleaning up when I chose not to be a cat owner.


    I would give the sensor driven water sprayer a go if it's a back garden. My issue was mainly the front garden so that was the one thing I wasn't able to try. The sonic deterrent also got vandalised a number of times presumably by kids who didn't like the sound, and next door had the same issue with theirs.
    • Rusty Shackleton
    • By Rusty Shackleton 21st May 19, 12:07 PM
    • 438 Posts
    • 648 Thanks
    Rusty Shackleton
    The sonic deterrent also got vandalised a number of times presumably by kids who didn't like the sound, and next door had the same issue with theirs.
    It's almost like they felt that others' behaviour, being somewhat intrusive and obnoxious, should be dealt with how they saw fit, while you and your neighbours saw their actions as vandalism.

    I hope the irony isn't lost on you and some of the others posters here!
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 21st May 19, 6:35 PM
    • 5,178 Posts
    • 5,978 Thanks
    robatwork
    Ficticious tw@ts too.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    If you're on Twitter, then @_dhotya is a constant joy for made up nonsense. I just wonder who has the time?
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 21st May 19, 8:21 PM
    • 24,811 Posts
    • 28,838 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    Cat owners need to train their cats to use the litter tray, then they rarely poo outside and cause a nuisance to others. I find that those cats that use my garden as a toilet come from houses who don't have litter trays because the lazy owners would prefer to never have to clean up their cat's disgusting smelling faeces. For them the fact their cat uses all the other gardens as a litter tray is heaven as they don't use their own garden to do it in.
    Originally posted by EmmyLou30
    Absolute nonsense. Domestic pet cats generally learn 'litter skills' as a kitten. Few kittens remain with their birth family.

    All my rescue cats have been litter trained when they came to me, all have had access to a clean 'toilet' in my home. Only my indoor-only cats have chosen to use a litter tray consistently. Indoor-outdoor cats vary in their preferences.

    Cleaning out a litter tray is not rocket science, and is not particularly unpleasant when done regularly. IME it is far less disgusting than a baby's poopy nappy. If the litter tray smells - more often of wee than poop - you put the whole tray inside a dustbin liner, hold the bag closed and tip out the tray. If it does not smell just 'scoop the poop.'

    How much cat poop stinks depends on their health, quality of their diet, whether they are neutered .... Letting a pet cat that has not been neutered roam freely is inexcusable.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Trainee Rosie the Riveter.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 22nd May 19, 5:01 AM
    • 28,415 Posts
    • 100,142 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Indoor-outdoor cats vary in their preferences.
    Originally posted by Fire Fox
    Indeed. Ours came litter-trained, but that changed as soon as they were allowed outside freely. One of them hated using the tray at night and tried to use one of the showers, if she could, having observed us using the loos!

    Now, although having free access outdoors at night, both cats follow human routines and come indoors after dark. We don't bother with a litter tray, because there's no neighbour with flower/veg beds to annoy, just us. I can't say I never find a cat poo, but it's rare, because most of the time they go in the dry earth under the hedges, the same as our other cats did at our last house. There, we were surrounded with cats, as it was an urban area, but still no big problem.

    Occasionally, there will be a rogue cat that leaves deposits un-buried on the lawn or anywhere, possibly as territory-marking. We had that here with an old, semi-wild tom, but he's passed-on. Just the badgers to moan about now!
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • EmmyLou30
    • By EmmyLou30 22nd May 19, 12:05 PM
    • 473 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    EmmyLou30
    Absolute nonsense. Domestic pet cats generally learn 'litter skills' as a kitten. Few kittens remain with their birth family.

    All my rescue cats have been litter trained when they came to me, all have had access to a clean 'toilet' in my home. Only my indoor-only cats have chosen to use a litter tray consistently. Indoor-outdoor cats vary in their preferences.

    Cleaning out a litter tray is not rocket science, and is not particularly unpleasant when done regularly. IME it is far less disgusting than a baby's poopy nappy. If the litter tray smells - more often of wee than poop - you put the whole tray inside a dustbin liner, hold the bag closed and tip out the tray. If it does not smell just 'scoop the poop.'

    How much cat poop stinks depends on their health, quality of their diet, whether they are neutered .... Letting a pet cat that has not been neutered roam freely is inexcusable.
    Originally posted by Fire Fox

    I'm purely going on relatives who have 8 cats (all use trays and have come from various shelters and homes and none from kitten age) and our own family cats over the years all of who used the tray (some from kittens we bought off a local farmer and some rescues). The odd poop is going to end up outside of course but so long as most is indoors the neighbours will be happy. But equally I have friends who don't have a litter tray and don't even try and get the cat trained as they just don't want the hassle when the cat does it in another persons garden - out of sight out of mind.


    It's an emotive subject and I don't ever condone harming animals but I can see why people get angry enough to do so. There's no cure all. You just have to try what you can humanely to lessen the problem.


    As another poster said, chucking water at them or anything else just makes them fear you....they just come back when you're not there. All the local cats know to run when they see me as I throw water out the bedroom window at them, out the back door at them etc. Not harming them, just making them scarper. But unless it's a sprinkler on a sensor to do it when you aren't there it's more for your own satisfaction than an effective deterrent!
    • no1catman
    • By no1catman 22nd May 19, 1:34 PM
    • 2,824 Posts
    • 2,109 Thanks
    no1catman
    [QUOTE=EmmyLou30;75835117]
    For me it means never gardening without gloves as it can be hiding under the surface, they do it on my plants and kill them, on the lawn, on the gravel down the side of the drive and I've tried everything. Nothing works on all the cats. The worst offender has recently moved out and my daily job of picking it up is now an occasional annoyance and I am so happy! It was making me angrier than you can possibly imagine to have to do their job of cleaning up when I chose not to be a cat owner. (QUOTE]

    In my previous small garden about 12' x 6' got used to never planting seedlings, or bulbs - just wouldn't last, yet all this natural fertiliser improved the soil - judging by the size of the worms, and three/four feet dahlias!
    Gloves, have then rarely use them. If too many 'big-ones' in the greenhouse (flies are a clue) dig a hole elsewhere ad relocate them. Others, just a curiosity - hasn't affected plants.
    And, no problem eating last year's beans and tomatoes.

    Current cat, will use the tray to pee in, then go out for 'big-ones'. Unlike other local cats she can't climb the walls so once out the back door she stays in our garden. Difficult calling her in these days - gone senile deaf!
    I used to work for Tesco - now retired - speciality Clubcard
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 22nd May 19, 1:55 PM
    • 24,811 Posts
    • 28,838 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    Indeed. Ours came litter-trained, but that changed as soon as they were allowed outside freely. One of them hated using the tray at night and tried to use one of the showers, if she could, having observed us using the loos!
    Originally posted by Davesnave


    Years ago one of our adult rescues would 'hightail' it back through the cat flap (back door) if it was raining. Mew by the front door until opened, looked disgusted to find it was raining there too.

    Rinse and repeat until it stopped raining or she got desperate.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Trainee Rosie the Riveter.
    • southcoastrgi
    • By southcoastrgi 22nd May 19, 8:31 PM
    • 5,625 Posts
    • 3,219 Thanks
    southcoastrgi
    I find a BB gun with light weight plastic BB's does the job.
    Originally posted by a.turner
    There always has to be one t@wt
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
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