Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • cherry76
    • By cherry76 18th Jan 19, 4:01 PM
    • 639Posts
    • 70Thanks
    cherry76
    Anybody using NHS hearing aid?
    • #1
    • 18th Jan 19, 4:01 PM
    Anybody using NHS hearing aid? 18th Jan 19 at 4:01 PM
    Hubby very reluctant agree to try NHS hearing aid to his lt ear. He has some hearing loss but still in denial and says he can hear ok. The problem at home is the tv is loud. Today he got his hearing aid the one with the thin tube behind the ear. It is Oticon BTE and finds it very fiddly to put on and hear whistling sound when on. Is this the norm next appt is in 6 weeks. He has already gave up and I feel he has been wasting the NHS staff time. Thanks
Page 2
    • LadyDee
    • By LadyDee 16th Feb 19, 6:35 AM
    • 3,872 Posts
    • 4,177 Thanks
    LadyDee
    It took two visits to have my aids adjusted correctly (done on the computer). The audiologist also downloaded an app onto my phone which allows me to adjust the treble/bass and volume, although there are buttons on the aids to alter the volume. The audiologist told me that almost everybody needs a couple of follow up visits to get them right, and they like to see people at least every six months to check that the patient is getting the best from the aids.
    Most important is to ensure there is no wax in his ears as this can partially block the tiny little hole in the earpiece and causes feedback.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 16th Feb 19, 12:10 PM
    • 10,198 Posts
    • 17,268 Thanks
    margaretclare
    DH gave up on NHS hearing aids after several clinic visits and no improvement. He went to Amplifon www.amplifon.com


    He's now much happier with the aids he has.
    Ęr ic wisdom funde, ęr wearš ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 17th Feb 19, 8:05 AM
    • 26,798 Posts
    • 70,566 Thanks
    pollypenny
    DH gave up on NHS hearing aids after several clinic visits and no improvement. He went to Amplifon www.amplifon.com


    He's now much happier with the aids he has.
    Originally posted by margaretclare


    I was thinking about you, MC, as I haven't seen you post for a good while. How are you doing?
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Welshlady1948
    • By Welshlady1948 11th Aug 19, 9:40 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Welshlady1948
    Welshlady1948
    Hi Polly Penny
    Interested that you have been supplied smaller Nhs hearing aids !
    Can I ask a few questions ?
    1. Are they behind the ear
    2. Are they the same as private hearing aids ie - Micro
    3. Do you have a mould or ear bud ?
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 11th Aug 19, 1:07 PM
    • 26,798 Posts
    • 70,566 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Hi Polly Penny
    Interested that you have been supplied smaller Nhs hearing aids !
    Can I ask a few questions ?
    1. Are they behind the ear
    2. Are they the same as private hearing aids ie - Micro
    3. Do you have a mould or ear bud ?
    Originally posted by Welshlady1948


    Yes, on top rather than behind the ear. I was wearing it too far back.

    It looks the same size as one worn by a friend who went privately.

    I have a mould.

    I'm in North East Wales, so Betsi Cadwaladr, I had a battle to get the smaller one. My friend who moved to Bangor was given the small one immediately.

    Where are you?
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Welshlady1948
    • By Welshlady1948 11th Aug 19, 7:01 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Welshlady1948
    Welshlady1948
    Hi Pollypenny
    I live down in South Wales 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 near Newport (Aneurin Bevan Health Board)
    I have a bte hearing aid with a mold, the mold has gone a dirty orange colour and they wouldn’t change it at my last visit which did upset me as I’m quite conscious of it. I’m struggling to hear in social surroundings so I need to do something about it.
    Looking at the Nhs hearing aids online I notice some have a very thin tube leading to a small bud which are very similar to private ones.
    Think I’ll make an appointment to see what they say (fingers crossed) and get mold changed.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 12th Aug 19, 7:40 AM
    • 26,798 Posts
    • 70,566 Thanks
    pollypenny
    WL, I had to nag for the smaller one.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 12th Aug 19, 4:39 PM
    • 40,100 Posts
    • 37,465 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    the mold has gone a dirty orange colour
    Originally posted by Welshlady1948
    See below 're the buds but I've got a sparkly pink mould (other colours are available!) And I'm a great believer in making my aid visible, although no-one ever seems to.

    Looking at the Nhs hearing aids online I notice some have a very thin tube leading to a small bud which are very similar to private ones.
    Think I’ll make an appointment to see what they say (fingers crossed) and get mold changed.
    Originally posted by Welshlady1948
    The buds are not suitable for profound loss, only mild to moderate. But I'd have thought services would be very ready to use them as they must work out cheaper than the moulds.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
    • cairndog
    • By cairndog 19th Sep 19, 4:32 PM
    • 218 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    cairndog
    Changing Your Earmould
    Hi Savy Sue


    My NHS audiogist in NW Kent has fitted giant eartips which have to be programmed by her to my hearing (she said? ) The theory was this would improve things as I was having trouble with TV/phone, everything.
    They have to be pushed in very hard and I hate them, in fact the right ear won't take it as my ear canal is too small.
    I've tried to get an appointment to get them out but I am only allowed 1 appointment every 6 months
    .
    I was interested to see from this forum that you need to have the correct tube length to fit each person, I believe mine are too long but we don't have the benefit of a local Drop-in Centre.


    I have been looking online at RIC and ITC aids with pros/cons and I may see what named brands my local Specsavers have to offer.
    It seems that Boots hearing is owned by one of the brands so thats out!


    Has anyone found this type of hearing aid successful? Of course they probably cost a small fortune but I have to do something soon.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 20th Sep 19, 1:37 AM
    • 40,100 Posts
    • 37,465 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    My NHS audiogist in NW Kent has fitted giant eartips which have to be programmed by her to my hearing (she said? )
    Originally posted by cairndog
    When I had the 'off-the-shelf' tips, I was told that some tweaking might be needed if I changed from the large mushrooms to the smaller ones, although I was also sent away with a couple of different ones to try, so not sure how much it matters, probably more with some kinds of hearing loss than others.

    The theory was this would improve things as I was having trouble with TV/phone, everything.
    They have to be pushed in very hard and I hate them, in fact the right ear won't take it as my ear canal is too small.
    I've tried to get an appointment to get them out but I am only allowed 1 appointment every 6 months
    Originally posted by cairndog
    Surely they do a follow up when something new is fitted? (Which reminds me my follow up from last time never arrived ...) I think this is something you might take up with PALS because it does seem very poor.

    Has anyone found this type of hearing aid successful? Of course they probably cost a small fortune but I have to do something soon.
    Originally posted by cairndog
    Well, DH has only ever had the 'off-the-shelf' mushroom moulds, and he gets on perfectly well with them!
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
    • sasparillo
    • By sasparillo 27th Sep 19, 6:34 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 37 Thanks
    sasparillo
    My mother has been told it’s unlikely she will get on with the smaller ‘anchor’ or ‘umbrella’ hearing aid because she has ‘moderate’ hearing loss. Which hearing aids are available for ‘moderate’ hearing loss?

    My mother had hearing aids (full ear ones) fitted last year at the local hospital which is about half an hour’s drive away - but she was not given an automatic follow up appointment. She absolutely hated them and when I looked at her ears, they were obviously red. She really didn’t want to wear them so left them out. Then I saw in the supermarket that there was going to be a session held by a county-wide hard of hearing organisation for free at the local hospital and I took my Mum to it. There we learnt sooo much and were told privately that the moulds from the factories often are too big and need filing down. We were never told that the hearing aids could be filed down. We were also told you can put a dab of Vaseline on the hearing aids. We’be been back and forth 3 or 4 times and my Mum is now managing to wear them and persevering but it isn’t easy.

    As has been said, hearing aids do often take a bit of getting used to. Our normal hearing is analogue and hearing aids are now digital. Digital should cut out some background noise but it’s not as ‘warm’ a sound as analogue.

    We’ve also learnt the hospital is supposed to take over earwax management. But in a separate appointment from the hearing aid appointment. If patients need more batteries, they either have to go to the hospital (for us half an hour’s drive away) or send a stamped addressed envelope.

    There are no local support groups or pick up points. We are on the outskirts of London.

    We are meeting more and more elderly people or relatives of elderly people who say the hearing aids hurt and are put away in a drawer. It is a known problem but the reasons given for it are not the ones we have encountered. In reality, the hearing aids are often too big and need filing down and need several hospital appointments. This means the person has to know about the filing down and also needs transport. There are no nearby support groups and pick up points for batteries. The ear wax situation was also never explained and patients are expected to go for earwax removal and hearing aid appointments are at different times/days. There are several GP surgeries but they obviously don’t liaise over this. Patients are expected to have transport or a supply of envelopes and stamps and be able to get the envelopes to a post box.

    If this is typical, the NHS is churning out hearing aids which are often not then used. And if relatives are concerned but unable to spend time on their relatives but wanting to help , the neighbourhood service are the hearing aid shops not the NHS - if people pay.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 28th Sep 19, 8:44 AM
    • 26,798 Posts
    • 70,566 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I am eventually happy with my hearing aid, after visiting audiology on Monday.

    I saw a great bloke, who said the setting is wrong, checked my ears for wax and fitted a new tube. He was patient and understanding, rather than being cross with me as the others have seemed. He explained the different modes, too

    I wore all week without a problem, even forgetting I had it in. I had even made an appointment with a private company. Cancelled that now.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • sasparillo
    • By sasparillo 29th Sep 19, 2:50 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 37 Thanks
    sasparillo
    Hi, Glad it’s better and you’re happy! What sort of hearing loss do you have. My mother was told she could not have a smaller one because she has ‘moderate’ hearing loss.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 29th Sep 19, 5:29 PM
    • 26,798 Posts
    • 70,566 Thanks
    pollypenny
    It's a Resound, but what sort I don't know.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • writer5
    • By writer5 1st Oct 19, 1:35 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    writer5
    Sasparillo- have you checked whether you can access NHS Hearing Services in your area? This is a sort of outsourced service that allows you /your mum to get free NHS aids, batteries, follow up appointments and adjustments in a local Specsavers or Scrivens shop [other suppliers may be available in your area].
    No need to go to hospital appointments and much more convenient and swift service. It used to be run by a company called GPCare in Bristol but changed providers last year. I have aids for both ears-one small cone type for mild loss, the other much larger for moderate.
    Just google NHS Hearing services and put in your postcode and it will tell you. Hope that helps
    • sasparillo
    • By sasparillo 4th Oct 19, 10:23 AM
    • 302 Posts
    • 37 Thanks
    sasparillo
    Sasparillo- have you checked whether you can access NHS Hearing Services in your area? This is a sort of outsourced service that allows you /your mum to get free NHS aids, batteries, follow up appointments and adjustments in a local Specsavers or Scrivens shop [other suppliers may be available in your area].
    No need to go to hospital appointments and much more convenient and swift service. It used to be run by a company called GPCare in Bristol but changed providers last year. I have aids for both ears-one small cone type for mild loss, the other much larger for moderate.
    Just google NHS Hearing services and put in your postcode and it will tell you. Hope that helps
    Originally posted by writer5
    Hi, I don’t think it’s done in our area. When I googled ‘NHS Hearing Services’ Specsavers comes up but when I put in the postcode the following comes up:

    ‘ We are currently not able to offer NHS funded hearing aids in your area. Unfortunately you live in an area where your local health authority has chosen not to commission this service in the community – however this may change in the future. You can still access NHS funded hearing aids through your GP.’

    Ditto for Scrivens

    ‘ Sorry – outside of catchment area. Sadly we are unable to help as you live in an area where we are unable to supply you with NHS hearing aids.’

    The hospital audiologist now says she is going to try a mould made of softer material which will take about six weeks.
    • Gers
    • By Gers 12th Oct 19, 7:33 AM
    • 7,726 Posts
    • 52,713 Thanks
    Gers
    Here's an article from The Guardian this morning.

    https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/oct/12/hearing-aids-private-nhs-models

    I've got an NHS hearing aid which seems fine. I needed very small tips as the ones offered hurt to put them in.
    • sasparillo
    • By sasparillo 12th Oct 19, 3:57 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 37 Thanks
    sasparillo
    Here's an article from The Guardian this morning.

    https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/oct/12/hearing-aids-private-nhs-models

    I've got an NHS hearing aid which seems fine. I needed very small tips as the ones offered hurt to put them in.
    Originally posted by Gers
    Good to know you’ve had a good experience. This article reflects what we’ve been thinking. We’re gaining as much knowledge as possible and trying all the options available on the NHS before even considering another route - especially if the hearing aids are by the same manufacturers and I suppose all the audiologists are trained on the NHS.

    The problem in our area is that the hospital is quite far away, they do not give an automatic follow up appointment after the first fitting and there is no local support. We are persisting but it takes considerable effort. And as the article says it often needs at least several appointments to get them right.

    For the elderly, physically challenged and others without their own transport and those dependent on others, it means it all boils down to the continued persistence and support of relatives and carers which of course is not necessarily forthcoming. The person with the hearing aid has to have regular access to stamps, envelopes and a post box to get the batteries as well.

    One would think that it wouldn’t take much for all the GP surgeries in our town with the hospital department to get together to arrange at least a monthly local meeting place for hearing aid support, examination for ear wax and irrigation etc. I do know now people who have hearing aids who are willing to help out as volunteers alongside professionals.

    And then it should be advertised adequately - another bugbear in an area where, for example, the local council provides free exercise classes but the GP surgeries do not put out the leaflets and refer instead to a scheme at the local leisure centre - also council owned but out sourced to a private company - which has three months’ free entry and then gives the choice of signing up - for £25 a month with a class with the exact same name as the always free keep fit class!

    It took us a year and a half to learn that once a GP’s patient comes under the audiology department of the hospital several miles away, ear wax removal comes under the hospital. But the ear wax removal has to be arranged as a separate appointment with no guarantee it will even be on the same day as the audiology department. The commissioning groups in the area do not subscribe to the scheme allowing NHS patients to visit local commercial chains for NHS hearing services.

    There must be many retreating into a silent world with no stimulation - not because they are not given hearing aids but because there are no support services and they give up on their hearing aids. I have tried to push the hospital about local support but with NHS superannuated GPs appearing to wash their hands of the situation and in the words of one person with hearing aids who has been trying for years to set something up, “At 65 they expect you to shut up and go into a cave.”, there has been no movement.

    At least this is how it seems unless there are services which aren’t publicised and we haven’t been told about. Which considering our experience so far is quite possible ...
    Last edited by sasparillo; 13-10-2019 at 7:52 AM.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,505Posts Today

7,636Users online

Martin's Twitter