Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Jordan90
    • By Jordan90 11th Jan 19, 7:34 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Jordan90
    Is this a breach of data protection?
    • #1
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:34 PM
    Is this a breach of data protection? 11th Jan 19 at 7:34 PM
    I work in a department with 2 colleagues, we've all just received our increase in salary for the new year. We all openly talk of our salaries and bonuses, ensuring all is fair. Equal pay for equal work. This year is the first year where one of my 2 colleagues has received a higher wage increase than myself and the other colleague, we'll call the higher paid colleague, C.
    I sent an email to my manager asking why this is the case and received the reply "C mentioned they haven't spoken of their increase in salary to anyone, how did you come to know C's wage increase? I am now looking at a serious breach of data protection"
    What am I looking at now?

    To add, I sent the email as I am genenuinely confused why C has received a higher wage. The workloads of us is as follows;
    C - 30%
    Other colleague - 10% (Does the bare minimum but I get along with him, I can't blame him)
    Me - 60% (Seriously, no extragation, I prefer more work as the time goes quicker)
    Both my manager and C are very sly, different in private than they are public.
Page 1
    • jonnygee2
    • By jonnygee2 11th Jan 19, 7:40 PM
    • 1,007 Posts
    • 971 Thanks
    jonnygee2
    • #2
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:40 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:40 PM
    To add, I sent the email as I am genenuinely confused why C has received a higher wage.
    Do you have a protected characteristic? Are you a woman and your colleagues men? (probably not given your username but worth checking!).

    Generally speaking, employers can pay who they like what they like. They may just think the others are more skilled. Also, generally pay is related to skills rather than workloads.

    "C mentioned they haven't spoken of their increase in salary to anyone, how did you come to know C's wage increase? I am now looking at a serious breach of data protection" What am I looking at now?
    There's no data protection breach. But what you are looking at is a very angry manager, which isn't great.

    It might be worth apologising, say you must have got the wrong end of the stick and that you were just asking to see if there's something you could do better.
    • 74jax
    • By 74jax 11th Jan 19, 7:45 PM
    • 4,936 Posts
    • 6,895 Thanks
    74jax
    • #3
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:45 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:45 PM
    If C didn't tell you how do you know?
    Forty and fabulous, well that's what my cards say....
    • elsien
    • By elsien 11th Jan 19, 7:45 PM
    • 18,601 Posts
    • 47,204 Thanks
    elsien
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:45 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:45 PM
    C probably isn't going to very chuffed that you've landed him in it, either - presuming they told you but are now denying it. If they didn't tell you, then how did you find out? That could potentially be a data breach which is why your manager is going to need to find out where your information came from.

    For future reference, that really wasn't a very smart way of going about things. Whether you think they are "sly" or not is neither here nor there.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Jan 19, 7:47 PM
    • 7,687 Posts
    • 8,326 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:47 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:47 PM
    I work in a department with 2 colleagues, we've all just received our increase in salary for the new year. We all openly talk of our salaries and bonuses, ensuring all is fair. Equal pay for equal work. This year is the first year where one of my 2 colleagues has received a higher wage increase than myself and the other colleague, we'll call the higher paid colleague, C.
    I sent an email to my manager asking why this is the case and received the reply "C mentioned they haven't spoken of their increase in salary to anyone, how did you come to know C's wage increase? I am now looking at a serious breach of data protection"
    What am I looking at now?

    To add, I sent the email as I am genenuinely confused why C has received a higher wage. The workloads of us is as follows;
    C - 30%
    Other colleague - 10% (Does the bare minimum but I get along with him, I can't blame him)
    Me - 60% (Seriously, no extragation, I prefer more work as the time goes quicker)
    Both my manager and C are very sly, different in private than they are public.
    Originally posted by Jordan90
    Good luck in the job hunt...
    • Jordan90
    • By Jordan90 11th Jan 19, 7:47 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Jordan90
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:47 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:47 PM
    Do you have a protected characteristic? Are you a woman and your colleagues men? (probably not given your username but worth checking!).
    Originally posted by jonnygee2
    No, me and the other colleague that didn't receive an increase are both men, while C is a woman.

    Generally speaking, employers can pay who they like what they like. They may just think the others are more skilled. Also, generally pay is related to skills rather than workloads.
    Originally posted by jonnygee2
    C isn't more skilled than me, I'm more knowledgable of the system and receive more requests from the manager to carry out. 60% of the workload tasks are my responsibilty, but I understand employers can pay who they like what they like, I will be raising a complaint about the increase to C's pay in relation to mine and my other colleague, but this thread is just about if I've potentially breached the data protection as I have no clue. I get it's my word vs C's but I still wanted confirmation for peace of mind really.

    There's no data protection breach. But what you are looking at is a very angry manager, which isn't great.

    It might be worth apologising, say you must have got the wrong end of the stick and that you were just asking to see if there's something you could do better.
    Originally posted by jonnygee2
    Thanks!
    • Jordan90
    • By Jordan90 11th Jan 19, 7:49 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Jordan90
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:49 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:49 PM
    If C didn't tell you how do you know?
    Originally posted by 74jax
    She did tell me, I've worked with her for near 10 years, she's always been sly but never this bad. All 3 of us are open and honest about any rewards we get to ensure we all get the same amount which is fair.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Jan 19, 7:50 PM
    • 7,687 Posts
    • 8,326 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #8
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:50 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:50 PM
    Do you have a protected characteristic? Are you a woman and your colleagues men? (probably not given your username but worth checking!).

    Generally speaking, employers can pay who they like what they like. They may just think the others are more skilled. Also, generally pay is related to skills rather than workloads.



    There's no data protection breach. But what you are looking at is a very angry manager, which isn't great.

    It might be worth apologising, say you must have got the wrong end of the stick and that you were just asking to see if there's something you could do better.
    Originally posted by jonnygee2
    Everyone has protected characteristics.

    There is no requirement to pay men and women the same
    • Jordan90
    • By Jordan90 11th Jan 19, 7:51 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Jordan90
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:51 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 19, 7:51 PM
    C probably isn't going to very chuffed that you've landed him in it, either - presuming they told you but are now denying it. If they didn't tell you, then how did you find out? That could potentially be a data breach which is why your manager is going to need to find out where your information came from.

    For future reference, that really wasn't a very smart way of going about things. Whether you think they are "sly" or not is neither here nor there.
    Originally posted by elsien
    C did tell me and is now denying it, it was naive of me, I'm in my own head, I forget and just assume ppl will be as honest as I am, hence why I called them both sly.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 11th Jan 19, 7:53 PM
    • 18,601 Posts
    • 47,204 Thanks
    elsien
    She did tell me, I've worked with her for near 10 years, she's always been sly but never this bad. All 3 of us are open and honest about any rewards we get to ensure we all get the same amount which is fair.
    Originally posted by Jordan90
    You can't ensure you all get the same rewards. Whatever you might think, that's down to the employer. All making a complaint will do is make you look worse. I really wouldn't go there.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Jan 19, 7:54 PM
    • 7,687 Posts
    • 8,326 Thanks
    Comms69
    Discussing salaries is often a no no; public sector is usually the exception - due to handing.
    • Jordan90
    • By Jordan90 11th Jan 19, 7:59 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Jordan90
    You can't ensure you all get the same rewards. Whatever you might think, that's down to the employer. All making a complaint will do is make you look worse. I really wouldn't go there.
    Originally posted by elsien
    I think we've all received the same rewards because our managers throughout the years, didn't really know too much about our department and the work we do. Our current manager doesn't either but I work a different shift pattern while C works the same shift pattern as the manager. I can understand why C has been seen favourably but not done enough to constitute a much higher increase in wage than me or our colleague, but life's like that, not fair and just.
    • Pennywise
    • By Pennywise 11th Jan 19, 8:00 PM
    • 11,309 Posts
    • 21,565 Thanks
    Pennywise
    You need to reply to your manager to explain how you knew. There's no breach of data protection if C told you herself. Your employer is right to try to investigate how you found out if they think it wasn't C - for all they know, there could be a gossip in their payroll dept.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Jan 19, 8:00 PM
    • 7,687 Posts
    • 8,326 Thanks
    Comms69
    I think we've all received the same rewards because our managers throughout the years, didn't really know too much about our department and the work we do. Our current manager doesn't either but I work a different shift pattern while C works the same shift pattern as the manager. I can understand why C has been seen favourably but not done enough to constitute a much higher increase in wage than me or our colleague, but life's like that, not fair and just.
    Originally posted by Jordan90
    Itís perfectly fair, legally
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 11th Jan 19, 8:02 PM
    • 4,737 Posts
    • 2,745 Thanks
    Lorian
    if they believe Her and not you, your continued employment could be potentially at risk.

    Can and will your other colleague corroborate that she told you both?
    • Jordan90
    • By Jordan90 11th Jan 19, 8:07 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Jordan90
    if they believe Her and not you, your continued employment could be potentially at risk.

    Can and will your other colleague corroborate that she told you both?
    Originally posted by Lorian
    Yes the other colleague can corroborate that she told us, only problem being that we all work different shifts so I wasn't there when she told him.
    • KiKi
    • By KiKi 11th Jan 19, 8:32 PM
    • 5,010 Posts
    • 8,118 Thanks
    KiKi
    The reason your manager has mentioned breach of data is because C claims she didn't tell you - but you know. So from your manager's POV, someone else who knows people's salaries has told you - which is a potential breach of data protection.

    I'm sure everything you've said about workload etc is true. But at the end of the day if the manager perceives that C has performed better than you - whether that be through workload, attitude, behaviour, support, level of complexity etc - they are entitled to pay her more than you. I've no idea what you intend to achieve by raising a complaint about it, but I can't see any good coming from it at all, I'm afraid.

    KiKi
    ' <-- See that? It's called an apostrophe. It does not mean "hey, look out, here comes an S".
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 12th Jan 19, 11:16 AM
    • 17,122 Posts
    • 42,077 Thanks
    FBaby
    I expect she told you 'in confidence' but you were so outraged you forgot the last bit. They will now deny it, or admit it and get a telling off but good luck working with them from now on.

    How can someone get a better increase. Well they can make themselves indispensable, not forcibly by doing more work but making a project a success because of something they did, or knew, or gained very good clients, or received many compliments etc... They could then have hinted they were considering looking for a better job and as they'd just been headhunted...

    They can just be cleverer about going about it although in this instance, they can't have been so clever if they thought a good idea to tell you and your colleague when told not to.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 12th Jan 19, 11:27 AM
    • 6,933 Posts
    • 5,468 Thanks
    ohreally
    Discussing salaries is often a no no;
    Originally posted by Comms69
    And unlawful.

    The Equality Act 2010 makes it unlawful to prevent employees from having discussions to establish if there are differences in pay
    http://www.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=1811
    Donít be a canít, be a can.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 12th Jan 19, 11:44 AM
    • 6,123 Posts
    • 6,839 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    To be blunt, the OP's opinion of what is fair and what isn't is totally unimportant unless discrimination can be proven. To contact a manager to question why somebody else got a bigger payrise is simply not the greatest idea ever, as the OP has discovered.
    Discussing salaries is not unlawful, although it might break the rules set down by an employer which is a disciplinary issue, not a legal one.
    I simply do not believe that one person is doing 6 times more work than a colleague who is supposed to the the same work. It indicates to me an inflated sense of their own importance and may in part explain why others are treated better.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,541Posts Today

5,930Users online

Martin's Twitter