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  • FIRST POST
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 14th May 18, 8:51 PM
    • 45Posts
    • 4Thanks
    Regan55
    Scammed from TSB
    • #1
    • 14th May 18, 8:51 PM
    Scammed from TSB 14th May 18 at 8:51 PM
    My son has been the victim of an elaborate phone/bank scam and has been scammmed out of almost 30k.

    Not sure how much I can, or dare put on here, as the whole sorry saga, which is still ongoing, has left me very suspicious.

    Can Anyone help
    Last edited by Regan55; 14-05-2018 at 11:30 PM.
Page 1
    • le loup
    • By le loup 14th May 18, 9:05 PM
    • 3,845 Posts
    • 3,824 Thanks
    le loup
    • #2
    • 14th May 18, 9:05 PM
    • #2
    • 14th May 18, 9:05 PM
    No details - no help possible.
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 14th May 18, 9:38 PM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    • #3
    • 14th May 18, 9:38 PM
    • #3
    • 14th May 18, 9:38 PM
    Its difficult to know how much to put on here?

    Basically he has been a victim of Sim swap fraud

    How they managed to get into his bank account, and transfer an ISA from one a/c to his other a/c, then with 8 faster transfers........empty his account?
    • zx81
    • By zx81 14th May 18, 9:41 PM
    • 18,144 Posts
    • 19,349 Thanks
    zx81
    • #4
    • 14th May 18, 9:41 PM
    • #4
    • 14th May 18, 9:41 PM
    Presumably you've reported this to the police?
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 14th May 18, 9:52 PM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    • #5
    • 14th May 18, 9:52 PM
    • #5
    • 14th May 18, 9:52 PM
    It has been reported to everyone.

    Bank, Phone company, Action fraud.
    Last edited by Regan55; 14-05-2018 at 9:54 PM.
    • No_6
    • By No_6 14th May 18, 9:55 PM
    • 640 Posts
    • 129 Thanks
    No_6
    • #6
    • 14th May 18, 9:55 PM
    • #6
    • 14th May 18, 9:55 PM
    Best of luck....let us know how it all goes
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 14th May 18, 10:01 PM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    • #7
    • 14th May 18, 10:01 PM
    • #7
    • 14th May 18, 10:01 PM
    Stressed out about it is the understatement of the year...........
    • scoot65
    • By scoot65 14th May 18, 11:05 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    scoot65
    • #8
    • 14th May 18, 11:05 PM
    • #8
    • 14th May 18, 11:05 PM
    I hadn't heard of 'Sim swap fraud' until now so I googled it.....
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 14th May 18, 11:13 PM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    • #9
    • 14th May 18, 11:13 PM
    • #9
    • 14th May 18, 11:13 PM
    Itís scary stuff
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 14th May 18, 11:53 PM
    • 5,647 Posts
    • 4,974 Thanks
    mgdavid
    I hadn't heard of 'Sim swap fraud' until now so I googled it.....
    Originally posted by scoot65
    did you click on the first link and get a virus infection? or are you not on a PC?
    The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....
    • Ben8282
    • By Ben8282 15th May 18, 1:46 AM
    • 2,378 Posts
    • 1,093 Thanks
    Ben8282
    My son has been the victim of an elaborate phone/bank scam and has been scammmed out of almost 30k.

    Not sure how much I can, or dare put on here, as the whole sorry saga, which is still ongoing, has left me very suspicious.

    Can Anyone help
    Originally posted by Regan55
    I don't really see how this SIM swap business could have enabled a fraudster to make the transactions. How did the fraudster get your son's bank details and log-in details including his user name, memorable word and password in the first place and enough personal details to convince his mobile phone company to transfer your son's number to a new SIM card? Did your son not realise that his phone had suddenly stopped working? Besides which, TSB don't send out the one time passwords mentioned in the information about this SIM swap so I don't see even if the fraudster had had your son's mobile number transferred to a SIM card in his possession what possible good it would have done him in respect of this..
    Last edited by Ben8282; 15-05-2018 at 6:46 AM.
    • noh
    • By noh 15th May 18, 7:00 AM
    • 5,256 Posts
    • 3,558 Thanks
    noh
    ,........Besides which, TSB don't send out the one time passwords mentioned in the information about this SIM swap so I don't see even if the fraudster had had your son's mobile number transferred to a SIM card in his possession what possible good it would have done him in respect of this..
    Originally posted by Ben8282
    TSB do use telephone verification to set up new payees online.
    https://www.tsb.co.uk/security/payments-security-process/
    • Zanderman
    • By Zanderman 15th May 18, 8:36 AM
    • 1,771 Posts
    • 4,410 Thanks
    Zanderman
    did you click on the first link and get a virus infection? or are you not on a PC?
    Originally posted by mgdavid
    Maybe give people a clue as to what you think that link is?
    Bearing in mind that google results vary by user so the first link won't be the same for everyone?

    (this info would be, of course, in the spirit of your signature "The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....")
    Last edited by Zanderman; 15-05-2018 at 8:39 AM.
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 15th May 18, 9:26 AM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    How it all works is beyond me.

    Basically, someone managed to get a new SIM card for his phone in a London store, hence taking over his phone......how they managed to get his bank details is????

    They then transfered money from his ISA, (and obviously having his phone, the bank send out a message, which they control) to his currant account, and through 8 faster payments, cleared him out.

    My son is in the army, and is unable to keep his phone in his pocket 24/7
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 15th May 18, 9:28 AM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    Please read.......it is the new scam apparently

    https://www.theguardian.com/money/2016/apr/16/sim-swap-fraud-mobile-banking-fraudsters
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 15th May 18, 10:13 AM
    • 5,647 Posts
    • 4,974 Thanks
    mgdavid
    Maybe give people a clue as to what you think that link is?
    Bearing in mind that google results vary by user so the first link won't be the same for everyone?

    (this info would be, of course, in the spirit of your signature "The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....")
    Originally posted by Zanderman
    it was this one:
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/sim-swap-fraud-explained/
    The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....
    • 18cc
    • By 18cc 15th May 18, 10:33 AM
    • 690 Posts
    • 462 Thanks
    18cc
    SIM swap fraud has been around for a little while now and generally the feeling is that you should not use banks such as Lloyds TSB Santander etc that verify new payees by sending out a text with a code in it

    you should rather use bank such as Nationwide First Direct even NatWest! These use card readers to verify new payees and are much much secure

    there have been warnings about this on and off can't remember where but definitely I have seen them

    As for the question of how the son's log on details etc were compromised that is not so easy although if you have access to the son's debit card and know a few things about him you can reset the log on details - that is even scarier

    Your claim is probably against the phone company you might want to take advice but certainly if you can show negligence by the phone company you can Sue them for the balance
    • 18cc
    • By 18cc 15th May 18, 10:36 AM
    • 690 Posts
    • 462 Thanks
    18cc
    This is from the Guardian in 2015

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/money/2015/sep/26/sim-swap-fraud-mobile-phone-vodafone-customer
    • karlie88
    • By karlie88 15th May 18, 10:51 AM
    • 8,450 Posts
    • 106,266 Thanks
    karlie88
    Hadn't heard of 'SIM swap' fraud until now. Scary stuff.

    The fraudsters basically phone your mobile phone network or go into one of their branches and say that 'their' SIM is damaged/lost/no longer working. Of course, it's not their SIM but someone else's.

    The mobile network ask for the mobile number, address and the person's DOB - all of which the fraudster has ready to hand. The mobile network cancels the old SIM and issues a new SIM to the fraudster.

    The fraudster then uses the new SIM to reset the person's online banking details and send payments across.

    But to do all of this, you need to know someone's mobile number, the network they're on, their address, their DOB, the bank that they use and either their online banking username or basic account details (account number/sort code or 16 digit card number). Now a lot of that information may be on someone's social media profile but some of it won't be (or at least shouldn't be). Which then makes you think, either your son has given some of this information to the fraudsters (inadvertently) or the fraudster is a friend/work colleague/family member who could quite easily get all this information should they want to.

    Looks like you've done all the right things OP - report to police, action fraud, your son's bank and mobile network provider. The only other thing I can add is that the fraudsters went instore to get the new SIM, so it may be worthwhile contacting that store and asking them to pass on CCTV to the police?

    Hopefully, the mobile networks and banks can work closely together to put a stop to this fraud. e.g. formal ID to be shown if requesting a new SIM, SIMs to be sent out to home address on file, 2 or even 3 step authentication when resetting online banking details etc.

    And that Guardian article confused me somewhat:

    Sims' SIM wasn't working as the fraudsters claimed the SIM was damaged on Sims' account.

    I hope it ends well OP. Which bank are we talking about here OP?
    Official MSE canny forumite and HUKD VIP badge member
    • Regan55
    • By Regan55 15th May 18, 11:33 AM
    • 45 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Regan55
    Vodafone fraud dept was informed last Saturday.........and last night I got told that they investigated it, and then closed the investigations.

    Yea right.........
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