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  • FIRST POST
    • cwrtcoed
    • By cwrtcoed 18th Jan 18, 4:47 PM
    • 77Posts
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    cwrtcoed
    retirement on ill health
    • #1
    • 18th Jan 18, 4:47 PM
    retirement on ill health 18th Jan 18 at 4:47 PM
    Hi
    Currently my wife works for a local authority and 7 months ago she suffered a TIA or mini stroke so she has lost the mobility of her left side.
    She has made improvement but I'm not sure if she will ever recover fully to go back to work within her role.

    There has been mention of being pensioned off, bearing in mind she still has over 20 years service left to do.
    The stroke is stress related which is strongly linked to her job whereby her manager (against the advice of another manager and office colleagues) had loaded her work up to maximum which I believe has caused this medical problem.
    She had already had a long spell off due to the same issue of work overload and time constraints, and six months later she found herself back in the same position.


    What I wanted to find out if the local authorities offer full pension and lump sum as if she had done her full time there.
    Unison are pretty crap in these organisations, and I wanted to see if anyone else has any experience they could assist me with because this is foreign ground for me.
Page 1
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 18th Jan 18, 4:54 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #2
    • 18th Jan 18, 4:54 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Jan 18, 4:54 PM
    Hi
    Currently my wife works for a local authority and 7 months ago she suffered a TIA or mini stroke so she has lost the mobility of her left side.
    She has made improvement but I'm not sure if she will ever recover fully to go back to work within her role.

    There has been mention of being pensioned off, bearing in mind she still has over 20 years service left to do.
    The stroke is stress related which is strongly linked to her job whereby her manager (against the advice of another manager and office colleagues) had loaded her work up to maximum which I believe has caused this medical problem.
    She had already had a long spell off due to the same issue of work overload and time constraints, and six months later she found herself back in the same position.


    What I wanted to find out if the local authorities offer full pension and lump sum as if she had done her full time there. - No. She cant do the job, she can be dismissed on capacity grounds
    Unison are pretty crap in these organisations, and I wanted to see if anyone else has any experience they could assist me with because this is foreign ground for me.
    Originally posted by cwrtcoed

    Unison, one of the biggest unions in the country are 'pretty crap'?


    I suspect actually they aren't telling you what you want to hear and you've taken that as being 'pretty crap'
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 18th Jan 18, 5:09 PM
    • 3,670 Posts
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    bouicca21
    • #3
    • 18th Jan 18, 5:09 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Jan 18, 5:09 PM
    I suspect actually they aren't telling you what you want to hear and you've taken that as being 'pretty crap'
    That may be correct, since on the face of it OP's wife is capable of work, just not what she was doing previously, but another possibility is that the local rep is not particularly good. I'd recommend getting advice from head office.
    • nicechap
    • By nicechap 18th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    • 1,194 Posts
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    nicechap
    • #4
    • 18th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    TIA = Transient Ischaemic Attack. i.e it goes away.

    Major causes are not stress :-

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/transient-ischaemic-attack-tia/causes/

    Maybe you mean a CVA, known more commonly as a stroke. I've worked with a number of people who have hemiparalysis, one was a HR manager for a national company.

    In terms of LA medical retirement, I think its only for people with terminal conditions, anything else would be according to how much she has paid in and how early she is getting it. And that would be after referral to occupational health etc as well as prognosis from consultant etc.

    Your union would be best placed to advise you.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” - George Carlin
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 18th Jan 18, 6:15 PM
    • 2,843 Posts
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    Silvertabby
    • #5
    • 18th Jan 18, 6:15 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Jan 18, 6:15 PM
    There are 4 levels of ill health retirement in the LGPS, starting with 'dismissal on grounds of ill health' which doesn't have any added pension benefits.

    Tier 1.
    Member not expected to work again before SPA. Pensionable service is enhanced to State pension age.

    Tier 2.
    Member could work again before SPA. Pension accrued to date of leaving is enhanced by 25%.

    Tier 3.
    Very rarely offered. Unenhanced pension is only paid for a set period, as member could be expected to return to work within a couple of years.

    Obviously, it's much more complicated than this.

    First thing to do would be to ask HR to refer your wife to Occ Health for a medical assessment.
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 19-01-2018 at 9:28 AM.
    • cwrtcoed
    • By cwrtcoed 14th Feb 18, 11:38 PM
    • 77 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    cwrtcoed
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 18, 11:38 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 18, 11:38 PM
    Hi silver tabby
    Yes that sounds about right with those options, she also has fibromyalgia and functional neurological disorder which was diagnosed by a consultant so not a good place to be at this time.
    I'm hoping they will pension her off cause I can't see her working again
    • Lioness Twinkletoes
    • By Lioness Twinkletoes 15th Feb 18, 6:59 AM
    • 1,295 Posts
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    Lioness Twinkletoes
    • #7
    • 15th Feb 18, 6:59 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Feb 18, 6:59 AM
    Hi silver tabby
    Yes that sounds about right with those options, she also has fibromyalgia and functional neurological disorder which was diagnosed by a consultant so not a good place to be at this time.
    I'm hoping they will pension her off cause I can't see her working again
    Originally posted by cwrtcoed
    If she has 20 years service left that must make her around 47? If so, are you seriously suggesting that she'll never work again? There is nothing that can be done to help her recover and carry out some form of work?
    • cwrtcoed
    • By cwrtcoed 15th Feb 18, 11:14 PM
    • 77 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    cwrtcoed
    • #8
    • 15th Feb 18, 11:14 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Feb 18, 11:14 PM
    According to her consultant and GP No, bit gutting really and hard to take in
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