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Results: Reusable Nappies: How much have they saved you?

0 or less - I gave up so they cost me money/didn't save me anything

22.22% • 8 votes

0-50 - I'm using mainly disposables and sometimes reusable

5.56% • 2 votes

51-100 - I'm using both roughly equally

2.78% • 1 votes

101-200 - I'm using mainly reusables with a few disposables for ease

36.11% • 13 votes

201+ - I'm only using reusables

33.33% • 12 votes

You may not vote on this poll

36 votes in total.

  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Andrea
    • By Former MSE Andrea 16th Jun 15, 12:17 PM
    • 9,418Posts
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    Former MSE Andrea
    Reusable Nappies: Have you used them?
    • #1
    • 16th Jun 15, 12:17 PM
    Reusable Nappies: Have you used them? 16th Jun 15 at 12:17 PM
    Update September 2017

    We started this poll a couple of years ago but it's as relevant as ever

    If you're interested in more ways to save money with re-usable products read our Recycle Week Hub.

    Join in!

    Back to the original post...


    ----

    7-13 September is #ZeroWasteWeek. We're working with several organisations to highlight how much you could save by re-using and recycling. See the full Zero Waste Week info.

    We'd love to know how much you spend on household items and whether you'd save by using re-usable versions. This discussion's all about reusable nappies. Have you used them and how much did they save you over disposables?

    What to do:

    Step 1: Use our Demotivator to work out how much you saved by using re-usable nappies instead of disposables PER YEAR!
    Step 2: Vote in the poll to tell us how much you saved.
    Step 3: Post in the discussion below to tell us which types of re-usable you went for, how much they cost you, whether it's a hassle and is it worth it?
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 19-09-2017 at 10:53 AM.
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Page 1
    • Rummer
    • By Rummer 16th Jun 15, 7:17 PM
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    Rummer
    • #2
    • 16th Jun 15, 7:17 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Jun 15, 7:17 PM
    I used reusables during the day for the first 6 months and I really liked them initially. However after 6 months they leaked a lot and even with a strip wash and the trial of different brands the leaking continued so I swapped to disposables.

    Night reusables were not for me as although they did not leak the smell and the level of saturation in the morning was dreadful.

    On reflection I would not use them again as the outlay costs were probably higher than the costs of disposables would have been over the time and the level of washing was high.
    Taking responsibility one penny at a time!
    • Gillyx
    • By Gillyx 16th Jun 15, 7:39 PM
    • 6,788 Posts
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    Gillyx
    • #3
    • 16th Jun 15, 7:39 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Jun 15, 7:39 PM
    I used them and off for the 2 years my son was in nappies, for us they were cost effective however it wasn't the reason we used them, it was for environmental reasons that I preferred them, we did use disposables at night time but I still feel that every time we used our reusable it was keeping one disposable out of land fill.

    I have kept all of our nappies in the case of ever having another child.
    The frontier is never somewhere else. And no stockades can keep the midnight out.
    • bylromarha
    • By bylromarha 16th Jun 15, 8:48 PM
    • 9,960 Posts
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    bylromarha
    • #4
    • 16th Jun 15, 8:48 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Jun 15, 8:48 PM
    Bought a set of reuseables for my first - cost 150 new and were MotherEase birth to potty. Bought a few more covers as baby grew, which added 100 over the next 2 years.

    Topped up the set with a few nearly new nappies and covers when baby 2 came along, as they were both littlies were wearing them. 50 for a massive set as seller did collection only.

    Sold them all on ebay (in the days when you could) when we were done for 300. Seriously - I remember being shocked that I got all my money back.

    Calculated we saved a good 500 over both babies. However, we also used disposables at night as I hated the smell in the morning if they were in a reuseable. So I think the poll should be one or another - either how much money did you save OR how are you using reuseables as many of us use them on baby 2,3,4...
    Last edited by bylromarha; 16-06-2015 at 8:52 PM.
    Who made hogs and dogs and frogs?
    • Louk
    • By Louk 17th Jun 15, 8:50 AM
    • 136 Posts
    • 80 Thanks
    Louk
    • #5
    • 17th Jun 15, 8:50 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Jun 15, 8:50 AM
    I used them on my Son for around 2 years. I really didn't spend a lot on them as I found some on eBay for 2-3 each which became the main bulk of my stash along with some more expensive pretty ones. I cut up fleece blankets for liners and used some baby face cloths from the pound shop as wipes at home and only used baby wipes while out so there was a big cost saving there too. Once he was out of them I sold the vast majority on so made some money back too.

    For me it was a real nix of cost, environmental benefits and cuteness that made me use them.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 17th Jun 15, 10:41 AM
    • 3,333 Posts
    • 7,915 Thanks
    jackyann
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 15, 10:41 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 15, 10:41 AM
    Well, I didn't really have a choice, back in the day disposables were horrid - leaky and not good on skin.
    4 kids - 2 dozen nappies for first, supplemented by another 6 for #4. Still have them lurking as emergency cloths.
    Big bucket with "napisan" sat in the bath - nappies held by one corner in the loo to flush anything off them, then straight in the bucket, then chucked in the washing machine overnight.
    We changed them more often than is done now with modern disposables, and I used soap & water with flannels (like Louk) and chucked the flannels in the bucket to wash with the nappies.
    I am an expert on the folding of traditional terry squares and am *deeply disappointed* that it is a skill no-one wants me to demonstrate (sigh!)
    • mr_knight
    • By mr_knight 17th Jun 15, 7:46 PM
    • 934 Posts
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    mr_knight
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 15, 7:46 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 15, 7:46 PM
    I used them on baby one, I really like them at night time and don't find they smell in the morning. I'm now using them with baby number two and have been given some more by a friend to top them up.

    Maybe you should ask about reusable wipes too...now they are a real money saver and great for allergy prone skin.
    • chanie
    • By chanie 17th Jun 15, 8:17 PM
    • 2,323 Posts
    • 12,688 Thanks
    chanie
    • #8
    • 17th Jun 15, 8:17 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Jun 15, 8:17 PM
    My local authority gave me a 30 voucher for reusable nappies, so I bought 3 nappies.

    I wanted to use them mainly for environmental reasons and the money saving was an additional benefit.

    I used them for about 6 months, until I went back to work. I only used them when I was at home, so not during the night or when I was going out. They are handy, but when you take the cost of buying them and the washing into account, I can't see how they save you money.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 17th Jun 15, 9:15 PM
    • 6,227 Posts
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    GwylimT
    • #9
    • 17th Jun 15, 9:15 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Jun 15, 9:15 PM
    We bought a set for just over 160 which were used on our son and daughter from birth to toilet training. We had enough nappies that you only needed to wash them once a week as well. There is no way we could have afforded disposable nappies and when we did use them in emergencies we madr sure they were biodegradable.
    Last edited by GwylimT; 17-06-2015 at 9:18 PM.
    • penguin83
    • By penguin83 17th Jun 15, 10:04 PM
    • 4,787 Posts
    • 13,105 Thanks
    penguin83
    I use them full time on my youngest who is now just over 2 years old. I initially did not use them to save money as such but purely because I could not find a disposable that didn't leak or give him awful nappy rash. I love them and would use them for any future children. I am not sure that I have saved money as I became a little obsessed and now own hundreds but they hold their value well in the most part so I should recoup some of my money if I can bear to part with them! xx
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    • Naf
    • By Naf 17th Jun 15, 10:21 PM
    • 3,053 Posts
    • 2,307 Thanks
    Naf
    I used reusables during the day for the first 6 months and I really liked them initially. However after 6 months they leaked a lot and even with a strip wash and the trial of different brands the leaking continued so I swapped to disposables.

    Night reusables were not for me as although they did not leak the smell and the level of saturation in the morning was dreadful.

    On reflection I would not use them again as the outlay costs were probably higher than the costs of disposables would have been over the time and the level of washing was high.
    Originally posted by Rummer
    This is pretty much exactly our experience also; leaky, didn't last very long, bulky, inconvenient. Used for less than 6 months with baby number one, and not at all since. They're now useful for mopping up spills etc lol.
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    • flora48
    • By flora48 17th Jun 15, 10:24 PM
    • 633 Posts
    • 595 Thanks
    flora48
    Well, I didn't really have a choice, back in the day disposables were horrid - leaky and not good on skin.
    4 kids - 2 dozen nappies for first, supplemented by another 6 for #4. Still have them lurking as emergency cloths.
    Big bucket with "napisan" sat in the bath - nappies held by one corner in the loo to flush anything off them, then straight in the bucket, then chucked in the washing machine overnight.
    We changed them more often than is done now with modern disposables, and I used soap & water with flannels (like Louk) and chucked the flannels in the bucket to wash with the nappies.
    I am an expert on the folding of traditional terry squares and am *deeply disappointed* that it is a skill no-one wants me to demonstrate (sigh!)
    Originally posted by jackyann
    Yes, back in the day, the decision was a no brainier given the leaky disposables that were available, I am also a master of nappy folding. However, given the choices today I really do not see how reusables save money. They are very expensive to buy and laundry costs need to be taken into account. I would have given my eye teeth not to have faced all that washing every day. It seems to me that the argument for reusables has to be the environmental one.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 18th Jun 15, 9:18 AM
    • 3,864 Posts
    • 9,305 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    I bought MotherEase ones second hand and a couple of sizes of wrap and used them from about 4 weeks old (they were just to big for my newborn) to 2 years when she went dry during the day. Still used them at night until she started to get closer to dry at night when we switched to disposable pull-ups.
    It was an eco decision for me - washing really wasn't difficult.
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 18th Jun 15, 1:26 PM
    • 3,901 Posts
    • 10,750 Thanks
    Caroline_a
    When my first daughter was born they were all we had! There were some very useless disposable ones that went into a pocket in plastic pants, but I never used those. How much did it cost? To be honest I have no idea as we had no other options!

    Pampers were around when I had my third and I happily used those, but they were expensive at the time. Which were best? Each had pros and cons but overall the disposable ones were easier.
    • DianneB
    • By DianneB 18th Jun 15, 3:32 PM
    • 794 Posts
    • 1,658 Thanks
    DianneB
    Yep, used them from 1973 to about 1979 with my first two children, as Caroline_a says it was all that we had! I had no tumble dryer then, nobody did, in the winter it was a b****r to get them dry and in the summer they went all crispy on the line if you left them out too long. The plastic pants that went on top used to crack round the legs and rub the babies thighs and you always had a bucket of stinking nappies in the bathroom.

    By the time I had baby no. 3 proper disposables were available and for me there was no looking back!!
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    • Former MSE Andrea
    • By Former MSE Andrea 19th Sep 17, 10:28 AM
    • 9,418 Posts
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    Former MSE Andrea
    Bumping for Recycle Week 2017 which starts Monday 25 September

    Andrea
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    • Doody
    • By Doody 19th Sep 17, 10:53 AM
    • 115 Posts
    • 260 Thanks
    Doody
    I'll join in with your bumping. My children were born in 1994 and 1998 so it was a while ago. We mostly used washables. A big mix of home made, outers that took a prefold or a disposable and compostable pad, and good old terry squares.

    It was presumably very cost effective as i blanched to see the cost of a pack of disposables. We had a lot so the nappy bucket got washed probably once a week. Far less than the cost of a weeks worth of disposable nappies.

    My initial motivation was environmental, all those tonnes of nappies festering away in landfill, taking hundreds of years to decompose. Not what I wanted my children to contributing to. It wasn't hard, once in the habit of washing, and taking a bag with spares out and a bag to put the used ones in. In fact, it was so easy I progressed to washable san pro as well. We had leaks very rarely, and night times were OK with another layer of absorbency.

    Something that intrigued me when I found out about it is Elimination Communication. Too late now, no more babies for me.
    • violettasomerset
    • By violettasomerset 19th Sep 17, 11:07 AM
    • 70 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    violettasomerset
    I've been using them with my now-one year old. We used disposables only for the first couple of months and the bins just filled up with nappies so quickly, little room for anything else. Once she was about 2 months, I did a month trial with our local nappy library to try out a range of different brands and styles, and following that I bought a load of Size 1 Little Lamb nappies and wraps secondhand on Ebay. I did have to buy some new waterproof wraps, as they do lose waterproofing after a while, but probably paid about 75 in total for all the Size 1 things - and I then sold them for about 40 once she grew out of them. I've now bought a set of Size 2 nappies, again all secondhand from Ebay and paid about 40 for the lot. I did have to buy new wraps again though, and also change wrap brand (buying some Little Lamb size 2 wraps for 20 and then selling them for 10 when they weren't comfortable for baby, and getting Motherease wraps instead).

    My husband refuses to use the reusable ones, not really sure why but partly perhaps because it means I'm more likely to do the nappy changes! so we probably get through one bag of disposables every three or four weeks, plus we use them if we go away overnight. I also use reusable wipes with water (just some brushed cotton cut up) instead of wet wipes when I'm at home, as they can also be chucked in the wash.

    Using reusables is a bit more hassle - it takes a while to wash particularly if the particularly poo-ey ones need a separate quick wash first then hang them up- but I only wash every other day, and even in winter I usually manage to dry them on the line, only using the tumble drier occasionally. However, I do feel pleased not to have the bin full of dirty nappies for up to two weeks at a time. I also find that baby clothes aren't cut for the ginormous bum that comes with a reusable nappy, so sometimes she need to move up a size in trousers before her legs are long enough.
    • ~Gabriel
    • By ~Gabriel 19th Sep 17, 11:55 AM
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    ~Gabriel
    I wouldn't use re-useable nappies, because the amount of money 'saved' is nothing compared to the hassle of having to wash the darn things (on top of your usual laundry load, which with children and babies is already a LOT) and also have a house stinking of Napisan.
    • Cheeseface
    • By Cheeseface 19th Sep 17, 1:35 PM
    • 149 Posts
    • 425 Thanks
    Cheeseface
    I used disposable with my first and reusable with my second, born 2005.

    I had 20 motherease one size nappies, which I started to use when my youngest was about 3 weeks old. We used them until well past their second birthday. I used reusable fleece liners which were great so saved more.

    I stored the dirty ones in a lidded bucket, washed in the evening every third day, dried overnight. They didn't smell at all.

    I think I spent about 200 altogether. I'm sure 24 months of disposable nappies would cost more. I never had the hassle of running out of nappies either.
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